“This little beauty works great. I bought it when the alarm on my mobile phone began to intermittently fail me. This little travel clock is beautiful in retro seafoam green and great for travel because its bright color ensures that you will never miss picking it up from your hotel nightstand at checkout. There is a faint, pleasant ticking, the hands glow in the dark, and the nightlight button is bright when needed. The pop-up alarm button is firm and works well though I am learning not to accidentally press it and turn the alarm off when picking up the clock. Overall, a fantastic alarm clock.”
Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]
Some predecessors to the modern clock may be considered as "clocks" that are based on movement in nature: A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a flat surface. There is a range of duration timers, a well-known example being the hourglass. Water clocks, along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments. A major advance occurred with the invention of the verge escapement, which made possible the first mechanical clocks around 1300 in Europe, which kept time with oscillating timekeepers like balance wheels.[1][2][3][4]
The Howard Miller Arendal II 625-551 Wall Clock is a long version of the ever popular Arendal Quartz Wall Clock. This tall, elongated 49" high wall clock features carved accents and a turned urn finial which complement the unique style. The aged dial offers black Roman numerals and decorative black hands. The long, wooden stick pendulum features an antique-brass spun bob which swings back and forth and is battery operated like all quartz clocks. The wooden stick swinging pendulum features an antique-brass spun bob. Quartz, triple-chime Harmonic movement plays choice of full Westminster or Ave Maria chimes with strike on the hour with 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 chimes accordingly or switch to hourly only. Bim Bam chime on the hour only. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
The Howard Miller Angelina 625-636 Wall Clock is part of Howard Millers New 91st Anniversary Edition of clocks. This clock has an aged look that is achieved through spatter marks, the use of a rasp, and well placed dents. The Antique White finish features brown undertones on select hardwood and veneers. The Angelina clocks that are made in 2017 will have the 91st Anniversary Edition inscription on the dial. The dial has an aged look with black Arabic numerals that look worn and charcoal grey hands behind a glass crystal that is convex. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping.
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Keep tabs on the time while creating an eye-catching focal point in your ensemble with this stylish wall clock. Crafted from metal, it features a circular silhouette with a black finish around the periphery while its Roman numerals and two spade hands inside are coated in an antique copper coloring. It only needs one AA battery to operate (not included), and is suitable for indoor and outdoor spaces alike. Measures 13.75'' W x 13.75'' H x 2'' D.
Although it isn’t strictly an “alarm clock,” the Google Home Hub can wake you up in the morning and do so much more. One of the most drastic differences between the Home Hub and other comparable devices is its size; the Home Hub stands at a mere 4.5 inches tall. This makes it small enough to fit comfortably on a nightstand. That small frame is partly due to the lack of a camera, which may be a pro or a con depending on how much you value your privacy. The Home Hub connects to the various Bluetooth-enabled devices you might have throughout your home, including lights, speakers, thermostat, etc. You can set up the Home Hub to respond to your voice commands, or manage devices using the touchscreen. For the purposes of an alarm clock, the Home Hub works terrifically. You can set a normal alarm, or even have the Hub wake you with a specific song from your music library. Given the Hub’s lackluster built-in speakers, however, you may want to connect it to your sound system if you have one. For more details, read our full review.
Seriously, projection clocks are awesome. Apart from the obvious design perks, you get high-speed USB charging for your phone or tablet overnight. (By the way, we recommend setting multiple alarms no matter what clock you buy, you heavy sleeper, you.) The large LED display of Electrohome EAAC475 is sure to wake you up if the reflection of the projection and the sound doesn’t. You can set this up without worry—power failure doesn’t stand a chance. The lithium-ion battery that’s included in this model acts as a backup power reserve, so you’re never caught with your guard down.
Wall clocks offer a decorative alternative to traditional wall art while also serving a practical function. Whether you want an oversized wall clock to mount above the fireplace and serve as a focal point in your living room or a small model to hang in your kitchen to help keep your family on schedule on school days, Overstock carries the perfect model for your needs. Trusted brands, including Westclox, La Crosse, and Hans Andersen Home, ensure accuracy and durability. From retro-inspired metal clocks in colorful finishes to classic wooden case clocks featuring lustrous stains, Overstock carries wall clocks in an array of styles, sizes, and types with a wide range of features. Read on to learn more about the inventory of wall clocks at Overstock.
Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]

A clock that looks good and runs smoothly instantly adds charm and functionality to your living space. For a fresh take on the traditional wall clock, consider this eye-catching design. Introducing Ribbon Wall Clock by Umbra Add a modern, minimalist twist to telling time. With Ribbon, you get a stylish piece of wall décor and a functional wall clock all-in-one. Made with high-quality metal that’s been shaped to resemble overlapping ribbons, this unique clock features contrasting hands...
The timekeeping element of a quartz clock consists of a ring of quartz about 2.5 inches (63.5 mm) in diameter, suspended by threads and enclosed in a heat-insulated chamber. Electrodes are attached to the surfaces of the ring and connected to an electrical circuit in such a manner as to sustain oscillations. Since the frequency of vibration, 100,000-hertz, is too high for convenient time measurement, it is reduced by a process known as frequency division or demultiplication and applied to a synchronous motor connected to a clock dial through mechanical gearing. If a 100,000 hertz frequency, for example, is subjected to a combined electrical and mechanical gearing reduction of 6,000,000 to 1, then the second hand of the synchronous clock will make exactly one rotation in 60 seconds. The vibrations are so regular that the maximum error of an observatory quartz-crystal clock is only a few ten-thousandths of a second per day, equivalent to an error of one second every 10 years.
“This alarm clock will wake you up! I’m totally deaf in one ear and partially deaf in the other. Alarm clocks I used before I purchased this one might as well have been turned off if I happened to have my good ear on the pillow when they went off. This one is loud! Now having said that, its loudness is adjustable, and I found that a low setting of two works just fine for me, but if I am particularly concerned about being awakened, I also set the vibrating disk, which is slipped under the mattress. Believe me: Even if you are totally deaf in both ears, this will wake you up. I was skeptical about the vibrator because I have a thick mattress, but it works with no problem at all! I wholeheartedly recommend this alarm clock for anyone who is hearing impaired.”
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