Now you can wake up to the sun without even opening your curtains. This alarm clock uses a gentle glow that simulates a sunrise, waking you gently and naturally, so you definitely won't want to murder it when it starts going off. Choose from five different calming sounds to pair with the gradual light for an all-around sensory experience, or just select the FM radio option (that you'll inevitably snooze once or twice).
Go to bed with positive thoughts. Tell yourself, “I want to get up early because…” and then, actually do it. Sleep studies happen all the time, and they tell us what exterior activities are affecting our dreams, our nightmares, etc., and talking to yourself as you drift off to bed has been proven to work. If you’re looking forward to something in the morning, tell yourself about it, and your body will hold onto that through the night.
Slave clocks, used in large institutions and schools from the 1860s to the 1970s, kept time with a pendulum, but were wired to a master clock in the building, and periodically received a signal to synchronize them with the master, often on the hour.[71] Later versions without pendulums were triggered by a pulse from the master clock and certain sequences used to force rapid synchronization following a power failure.
Tired of the same old clock hanging on your wall? Is the incessant ticking of the time a constant reminder you need to change it out? Purchase a new wall clock from our great selection. All of Zazzle's wall clock designs are printed in full color, so the design you choose will look vibrant for a long time. Not only can you choose from our great designs, you can also pick whether you want a round, square, or aqua clock to help keep track of time. Browse through the collection to find a clock you'll love every second and every minute!
If you have a serious problem sleeping through your alarm, this retro little clock is for you. Because it doesn’t have a snooze button, you’ll be forced to either shut the alarm off completely and risk oversleeping, or you’ll learn to rise with the alarm. Also good: it’s doesn’t have an annoying ticking sound like other vintage clocks, so you won’t be kept awake at night.
A brushed and polished brass finish gives this metal carriage alarm clock its enduring style. The decorative handle, turned brass button feet, and polished brass-tone columns at the corners add to the clock's stately presence. Beneath a glass crystal, the brushed brass-tone dial features circular, diamond-cut numeral ring, black Roman numerals, black hour and minute hands, and brass second and alarm hands.
An alarm clock (alarm for short) is a clock that is designed to alert an individual or group of individuals at specified time. The primary function of these clocks is to awaken people from their night's sleep or short naps; they are sometimes used for other reminders as well. Most use sound; some use light or vibration. Some have sensors to identify when a person is in a light stage of sleep, in order to avoid waking someone who is deeply asleep, which causes tiredness, even if the person has had adequate sleep. To stop the sound or light, a button or handle on the clock is pressed; most clocks automatically stop the alarm if left unattended long enough. A classic analog alarm clock has an extra hand or inset dial that is used to specify the time at which to activate the alarm. Alarm clocks are also found on mobile phones, watches, and computers.
The pendulum is a reliable time measurer because, for small arcs, the time required for a complete swing (period) depends only on the length of the pendulum and is almost independent of the extent of the arc. The length of a pendulum with a period of one second is about 39 inches (990 mm), and an increase in length of 0.001 inch (0.025 mm) will make the clock lose about one second per day. Altering the length of a pendulum is therefore a sensitive means of regulation. The alteration is usually carried out by allowing the bob to rest upon a nut that can be screwed up or down the pendulum rod.
A clock mechanism may be used to control a device according to time, e.g. a central heating system, a VCR, or a time bomb (see: digital counter). Such mechanisms are usually called timers. Clock mechanisms are also used to drive devices such as solar trackers and astronomical telescopes, which have to turn at accurately controlled speeds to counteract the rotation of the Earth.
The Howard Miller Morrison Wall Clock has a contemporary style in a curved structure. This wall clock has a rectangular shape with metallic highlights. The wall clock features a pendulum that makes it functional and a convenient clock to hang on the wall. This wall clock can be mounted on your bedroom wall or even in office. The sturdy clock can also be a great addition in an all boy’s room. This contemporary styled wall clock has a rectangular shape with recessed brushed nickel band...
Islamic civilization is credited with further advancing the accuracy of clocks with elaborate engineering. In 797 (or possibly 801), the Abbasid caliph of Baghdad, Harun al-Rashid, presented Charlemagne with an Asian Elephant named Abul-Abbas together with a "particularly elaborate example" of a water[12] clock. Pope Sylvester II introduced clocks to northern and western Europe around 1000AD[13]
Early clock dials did not indicate minutes and seconds. A clock with a dial indicating minutes was illustrated in a 1475 manuscript by Paulus Almanus,[31] and some 15th-century clocks in Germany indicated minutes and seconds.[32] An early record of a seconds hand on a clock dates back to about 1560 on a clock now in the Fremersdorf collection.[33]:417–418[34]
A silent instrument missing such a striking mechanism has traditionally been known as a timepiece.[5] In general usage today, a "clock" refers to any device for measuring and displaying the time. Watches and other timepieces that can be carried on one's person are often distinguished from clocks.[6] Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century. During the 15th and 16th centuries, clockmaking flourished. The next development in accuracy occurred after 1656 with the invention of the pendulum clock. A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The electric clock was patented in 1840. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all.
The clock features a solid wood core and wooden mini balls finished in rich brown tones. There are numerous silver rods radiating out from the core with some bearing wooden balls and others not. The inner assembly of balls is randomly spaced while there are twelve balls reserved for the extreme ends of hour markers. The clock is driven by a high quality Quartz movement (requiring only one AA battery; not included) 19.5 in.
Bring home this table clock that showcases an antique-inspired look. Measuring 18'' H x 15'' W x 5'' D, it's the perfect piece to place on a bookshelf or desktop for a practical yet decorative accent. Made in a traditional, alarm-clock inspired style, it features a distressed gray metal frame and feet. Its face displays an off-white background and faded roman numerals, as well as an hour hand, minute hand, and ornamental gears in the center. It accommodates one AA battery to help keep you on...

The Homedics SoundSpa Digital FM Tabletop Clock with time projection gives you the power to create a soothing, relaxing sleep environment. Choose from eight peaceful relaxation sounds including ocean, white noise, brook, rainforest, thunder, rain, fan, campfire, or simply switch on the radio. The SoundSpa Digital FM Tabletop Clock comes with the option of time projection and a soothing blue light.
Here is a clock that will look great in any room in the house and it never needs a plug! This Water Clock is powered by ordinary tap water. Never needs batteries or electricity. Just fill this Water clock with water and you are on your way to more eco-friendly home. After about 6 months to a year you may need to dump the water out (your can pour it into a plant) and refill. The clock will remember the time as you do so. It even has an alarm. Great for traveling as well. Why would you ever use...
In 1735, Harrison built his first chronometer, which he steadily improved on over the next thirty years before submitting it for examination. The clock had many innovations, including the use of bearings to reduce friction, weighted balances to compensate for the ship's pitch and roll in the sea and the use of two different metals to reduce the problem of expansion from heat. The chronometer was tested in 1761 by Harrison's son and by the end of 10 weeks the clock was in error by less than 5 seconds.[43]
“This little beauty works great. I bought it when the alarm on my mobile phone began to intermittently fail me. This little travel clock is beautiful in retro seafoam green and great for travel because its bright color ensures that you will never miss picking it up from your hotel nightstand at checkout. There is a faint, pleasant ticking, the hands glow in the dark, and the nightlight button is bright when needed. The pop-up alarm button is firm and works well though I am learning not to accidentally press it and turn the alarm off when picking up the clock. Overall, a fantastic alarm clock.”
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