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Until advances in the late twentieth century, navigation depended on the ability to measure latitude and longitude. Latitude can be determined through celestial navigation; the measurement of longitude requires accurate knowledge of time. This need was a major motivation for the development of accurate mechanical clocks. John Harrison created the first highly accurate marine chronometer in the mid-18th century. The Noon gun in Cape Town still fires an accurate signal to allow ships to check their chronometers. Many buildings near major ports used to have (some still do) a large ball mounted on a tower or mast arranged to drop at a pre-determined time, for the same purpose. While satellite navigation systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) require unprecedentedly accurate knowledge of time, this is supplied by equipment on the satellites; vehicles no longer need timekeeping equipment.
There’s a lot of science when it comes to sleeping, and there’s never a short supply of sleep-related tests going on. One of our favorite electronic brands here on Gear Hungry has made the most effective clock (in our humble opinion), and it’s the #8 pick: Philips Wake-Up HF3505. Slow light build mimics the sunrise, and gently pulls you out of a sleep-like trance before hitting you with some serious sound. Between price, effectiveness, and the fact that we didn’t have to chase it around the room (sorry Clocky, we’re not morning people), we absolutely loved this one.
Howard Miller Carmen wrought iron wall clock with cast decorative corner ornaments finished in warm gray, dusty wax highlights. Windsor Cherry finished wood columns provide a warm accent on each side. Convex glass covers the antique dial, which offers black Roman numerals and serpentine hands. The swinging pendulum is finished in warm gray with dusty wax highlights to match the case. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement.
late 14c., clokke, originally "clock with bells," probably from Middle Dutch clocke (Dutch klok) "a clock," from Old North French cloque (Old French cloke, Modern French cloche), from Medieval Latin (7c.) clocca "bell," probably from Celtic (cf. Old Irish clocc, Welsh cloch, Manx clagg "a bell") and spread by Irish missionaries (unless the Celtic words are from Latin); ultimately of imitative origin.
With this collection's award-winning and patented Smart Set technology, the flashing "12:00" display is a thing of the past. The digital tuning clock radio automatically sets itself on the first use to the correct year, month, date, day, and time. The clock radio features a large and easy-to-read LED display. The alarm can be programmed to operate on weekdays only, weekends only, or all seven days of the week. The alarm displays the month and date with the touch of a button. Set the alarm to...

This 24" large metal Large Wall Clock is finished in a dark rubbed bronze with aged bronze accents at the 3, 6, 9 and 12 positions. The aged dial features a subtle center pattern, aged black Roman numerals, black spade hour and minute hands and a convex glass crystal. A twisted metal ring frames the dial. Quartz, battery operated movement. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
A captivating timepiece, this 29-inch wall clock stylishly pays homage to French country style with elegance. Especially fitting for an empty wall space, this wooden piece effortlessly draws the eye with its bold Roman numerals and matching clock hands that hover over a pale aqua and ivory-colored face. Its fleur-de-lis and floral details are a harmonious match for a romantic and feminine aesthetic in the living room, which is easily complemented by other weathered décor and Parisian...

Howard Miller 625-323 Alton wall clock. Matte black case with shatter-resistant acrylic crystal. White dial and large, easy-to-read black Arabic numerals. Auto Daylight-Savings movement automatically adjusts for Daylight Savings Time. The hands of the clock follow an LCD display on the back of the clock and make corrections to keep the correct time including Daylight Saving Time corrections.


In the 13th century, Al-Jazari, an engineer from Mesopotamia (lived 1136–1206) who worked for Artuqid king of Diyar-Bakr, Nasir al-Din, made numerous clocks of all shapes and sizes. A book on his work described 50 mechanical devices in 6 categories, including water clocks. The most reputed clocks included the Elephant, Scribe and Castle clocks, all of which have been successfully reconstructed. As well as telling the time, these grand clocks were symbols of status, grandeur and wealth of the Urtuq State.[citation needed]

The Howard Miller Brohman 625-618 Large Wall Clock has a brushed, warm brown finish and metallic undertones. At 34" in diameter with a 22" aged dial this clock will fit just about any decor. With large Roman numerals and black hands this clock will be a favorite for years to come. Highly accurate quartz movement requires one AA battery (Not Included).
The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–348 BC) was said to possess a large water clock with an unspecified alarm signal similar to the sound of a water organ; he used it at night, possibly for signaling the beginning of his lectures at dawn (Athenaeus 4.174c).[2] The Hellenistic engineer and inventor Ctesibius (fl. 285–222 BC) fitted his clepsydras with dial and pointer for indicating the time, and added elaborate "alarm systems, which could be made to drop pebbles on a gong, or blow trumpets (by forcing bell-jars down into water and taking the compressed air through a beating reed) at pre-set times" (Vitruv 11.11).[3]

This farmhouse wall clock measures 36 in. across This farmhouse wall clock measures 36 in. across the face and features horizontal cedar wood slats a white distressed finish hand painted black Roman numerals in a Poster Condensed font and an inner accent ring with individual hour marks. It includes a high torque quartz movement antique-style spade hands and ...  More + Product Details Close


If Amazon’s alarm clock isn’t your cup of tea, however, then there’s probably another cutting-edge device for you. Light sleepers may require a little background noise throughout the evening, while deep sleepers need louder alarms to wake them in the morning. There are even alarm clocks that utilize lighting technology instead of traditional alarm functions, thus allowing for a steady, gradual sunrise in your bedroom. People are finicky about their sleeping gadgets, but, fortunately, one of these alarm clocks can probably match your lifestyle and budget. And who knows? You just might finally become a morning person.
Fellow tea-lovers, all of our dreams are coming true! We can finally wake up to the smells and sounds of freshly brewed tea with the Teasmade Alarm Clock. Instead of making screeching noises to get you out of bed, it'll first brew you a fresh cup of tea at the time of your choice, and then sound an alarm after boiling is complete. After dark, the face of the clock illuminates with an adjustable blue night light that's dim enough to not disturb light-sensitive sleepers.

Greek astronomer Andronicus of Cyrrhus supervised the construction of the Tower of the Winds in Athens in the 1st century B.C.[11] The Greek and Roman civilizations are credited for initially advancing water clock design to include complex gearing, which was connected to fanciful automata and also resulted in improved accuracy. These advances were passed on through Byzantium and Islamic times, eventually making their way back to Europe. Independently, the Chinese developed their own advanced water clocks(水鐘)in 725 A.D., passing their ideas on to Korea and Japan.
The word horologia (from the Greek ὥρα, hour, and λέγειν, to tell) was used to describe early mechanical clocks,[15] but the use of this word (still used in several Romance languages) [16] for all timekeepers conceals the true nature of the mechanisms. For example, there is a record that in 1176 Sens Cathedral installed a ‘horologe’[17] but the mechanism used is unknown. According to Jocelin of Brakelond, in 1198 during a fire at the abbey of St Edmundsbury (now Bury St Edmunds), the monks 'ran to the clock' to fetch water, indicating that their water clock had a reservoir large enough to help extinguish the occasional fire.[18] The word clock (from the Celtic words clocca and clogan, both meaning "bell"), which gradually supersedes "horologe", suggests that it was the sound of bells which also characterized the prototype mechanical clocks that appeared during the 13th century in Europe.
A perfect piece for nightstands and home office desks, this radio alarm clock tunes to your favorite stations as it keeps an eye on the hour. Its bright red LED numbers are easy to read from afar, while the repeating nine-minute snooze is sure to become your new best friend on lazy Sunday mornings. This digital clock includes memory for up to 20 radio stations and includes an audio input for smartphones and MP3 players. Though this radio plugs into your wall, it also runs on two AAA batteries...
In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.
This isn’t for just any old sleeper. This is going to ensure that you get up with every bit of vigor in its little electronic body. Sonic Alert brings us a seriously powerful alarm clock that actually shakes the bed to get you out of it, and comes with a large red LCD screen. You’ll have red flashing in your eyes, the bed rumbling, and a loud sound as the light pulsates to get you up. The world isn’t ending, you’re just getting up for work again. Look alive, tiger!
Many alarm clocks have radio receivers that can be set to start playing at specified times, and are known as clock radios. Some alarm clocks can set multiple alarms, a useful feature for couples who have different waking up schedules. A progressive alarm clock, still new in the market, can have different alarms for different times (see Next-Generation Alarms) and even play music of your choice. Most modern televisions, mobile phones and digital watches have alarm clock functions to turn on or make sounds at a specific time.
In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.
Not just a functional accent, this oversize wall clock brings pastoral style to any empty space in your abode. Crafted from wood and metal, it features a circular silhouette and cutout roman numerals as well as spade hands fixed atop a floral-inspired motif. Two AA batteries keep this design ticking and tocking, while a 36'' W x 36'' H x 1'' D frame is sure to grab glances in the entryway or over the living room seating group.
While some people have a type of internal clock and can wake up around the same time every day, most people need a little extra help in this department. Without an alarm clock, you could sleep through your plans for the day, whether those plans include fun activities with loved ones or getting things done around the house. You might think you can use the built-in alarm on your phone. However, it's too easy to grab your phone from your bedside table and turn off the alarm without really waking up and getting going for the day.
Instead of sleepily fumbling with the alarm in the mornings trying to find the “off” switch, simply flip this alarm over to the other side. That’s it. Amazon reviewers rave about how minimalist and lightweight it is, perfect for throwing in your carry-on for vacations or business trips. Bonus: It comes in a variety of bright poppy hues, as well as more subdued colors like this modern dark wood.

The Howard Miller Angelina 625-636 Wall Clock is part of Howard Millers New 91st Anniversary Edition of clocks. This clock has an aged look that is achieved through spatter marks, the use of a rasp, and well placed dents. The Antique White finish features brown undertones on select hardwood and veneers. The Angelina clocks that are made in 2017 will have the 91st Anniversary Edition inscription on the dial. The dial has an aged look with black Arabic numerals that look worn and charcoal grey hands behind a glass crystal that is convex. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping.
Molded by mid-century modern style, this 38" wall clock brings a bit of bold flair to any space in your home. Its generous size helps it grab glances (and compliments!) from guests, while its open and numberless design gives it a minimalist feel. Crafted from metal, this round silhouette sports a gold finish with silver-finished hands in the center for subtle contrast. Two AA batteries (not included) are required to operate.
Clocks have a secret life: they're responsible for much more than telling time. From pocket watches to grandfather clocks, a time piece has usually been used to make a statement about the owner as much as it has about the hour. With this clock, you can make a statement in rustic style. Featuring numerals in a lighter inset wood, this piece measures 29.75'' H x 29.75'' W x 2.38'' D. Because both the hands and wood are dark, we recommend displaying this piece in a well-lit area for easier...

Early clock dials did not indicate minutes and seconds. A clock with a dial indicating minutes was illustrated in a 1475 manuscript by Paulus Almanus,[31] and some 15th-century clocks in Germany indicated minutes and seconds.[32] An early record of a seconds hand on a clock dates back to about 1560 on a clock now in the Fremersdorf collection.[33]:417–418[34]
A well-made large wall clock that looks good and runs smoothly can bring charm and functionality to any space. For a fresh take on the traditional clock, consider this eye-catching design... Introducing Rimwood by Umbra Every Umbra wall clock is tested in our factory before shipping to ensure it works perfectly. This, coupled with a sleek and modern design, ensures you’re getting a clock that not only tells time accurately but also looks great. This classically-inspired clock has a truly...
In mechanical clocks, the low Q of the balance wheel or pendulum oscillator made them very sensitive to the disturbing effect of the impulses of the escapement, so the escapement had a great effect on the accuracy of the clock, and many escapement designs were tried. The higher Q of resonators in electronic clocks makes them relatively insensitive to the disturbing effects of the drive power, so the driving oscillator circuit is a much less critical component.[2]

Emerson alarm clock radio features relaxing sounds that help you unwind and fall asleep faster. Perfect for bedrooms, baby nurseries, spas, salons, apartments, offices and anywhere where unwanted disturbing or intrusive noise is a problem. The noise sound machine can help block out distractions and promote relaxation prior to sleep to provide you with a more peaceful, restful night sleep. Sounds include ocean side, rain, rain forest, summer night, tide and noise. With features such as a...

The Electrohome Projection Alarm Clock is the second-best selling alarm clock on Amazon, with more than 9,700 reviews. Many buyers praised the projection feature, and particularly liked the fact that the brightness of the blue LCD display can be adjusted; for some owners, the clock's light is just a little too intense. The ability to set one alarm time for Monday through Friday, and a separate time for the weekend was another popular feature.

In mechanical clocks, the power source is typically either a weight suspended from a cord or chain wrapped around a pulley, sprocket or drum; or a spiral spring called a mainspring. Mechanical clocks must be wound periodically, usually by turning a knob or key or by pulling on the free end of the chain, to store energy in the weight or spring to keep the clock running.


The most accurate mechanical timekeeper is the Shortt pendulum clock; it makes use of the movement described above for electric master clock systems. The Shortt pendulum clock consists of two separate clocks, one of which synchronizes the other. The timekeeping element is a pendulum that swings freely, except that once every half minute it receives an impulse from a gently falling lever. This lever is released by an electrical signal transmitted from its slave clock. After the impulse has been sent, a synchronizing signal is transmitted back to the slave clock that ensures that the impulse to the free pendulum will be released exactly a half minute later than the previous impulse. The pendulum swings in a sealed box in which the air is kept at a constant, low pressure. Shortt clocks in observatories are kept in a room, usually a basement, where the temperature remains nearly constant, and under these conditions they can maintain the correct time to within a few thousandths of a second per day.
Water clocks, also known as clepsydrae (sg: clepsydra), along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments, with the only exceptions being the vertical gnomon and the day counting tally stick.[9] Given their great antiquity, where and when they first existed is not known and perhaps unknowable. The bowl-shaped outflow is the simplest form of a water clock and is known to have existed in Babylon and in Egypt around the 16th century BC. Other regions of the world, including India and China, also have early evidence of water clocks, but the earliest dates are less certain. Some authors, however, write about water clocks appearing as early as 4000 BC in these regions of the world.[10]
Howard Miller Carmen wrought iron wall clock with cast decorative corner ornaments finished in warm gray, dusty wax highlights. Windsor Cherry finished wood columns provide a warm accent on each side. Convex glass covers the antique dial, which offers black Roman numerals and serpentine hands. The swinging pendulum is finished in warm gray with dusty wax highlights to match the case. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement.
In a typical verge-and-foliot escapement, the weighted rope unwinds from the barrel, turning the toothed escape wheel. Controlling the movement of the wheel is the verge, a vertical rod with pallets at each end. When the wheel turns, the top pallet stops it and causes the foliot, with its regulating weights, to oscillate. This oscillation turns the verge and releases the top pallet. The wheel advances until it is caught again by the bottom pallet, and the process repeats itself. The actions of the escapement stabilize the power of the gravitational force and are what produce the ticktock of weight-driven clocks.
Some clocks, usually digital ones, include an optical projector that shines a magnified image of the time display onto a screen or onto a surface such as an indoor ceiling or wall. The digits are large enough to be easily read, without using glasses, by persons with moderately imperfect vision, so the clocks are convenient for use in their bedrooms. Usually, the timekeeping circuitry has a battery as a backup source for an uninterrupted power supply to keep the clock on time, while the projection light only works when the unit is connected to an A.C. supply. Completely battery-powered portable versions resembling flashlights are also available.
Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]
A. Like many items today, the amount you’ll pay for an alarm clock depends on how much technology you want layered onto it. If you desire nothing but a simple analog alarm clock that rouses you with a single tone, you could spend as little as $10. A slightly more sophisticated clock radio might cost $20 or so. If you want a deluxe digital alarm clock with screen projection, Bluetooth capability, MP3 player, or other cool features, you’re looking at a price of anywhere from $40 to $90.

Strong, durable, super large time display makes the model perfect for those who either want a big number clock, or for visually impaired individuals who need extra-large numerals, The red LED display on a black background, makes the contrast ideal for easy viewing. The electric power with battery backup lets you sleep with peace of mind and the extra-large snooze bar keeps nap-time within reach. This clock is a solid purchase.


This 77th Anniversary wall clock offers both substance and charm. Our most popular westminster wall clock with chimes and pendulum. The gently scalloped arched bonnet is supported by reeded columns with artfully turned caps. Behind the opening door, the off-white dial features black Arabic numerals, black serpentine hour and minute hands. A polished brass finished lyre and bezel provide the perfect accents to the warm wood case. Finished in Golden Oak on select hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, dual chime movement plays Westminster or Ave Maria chimes, and features volume control and automatic nighttime chime shut-off option.
Remember a time before everything was digital? Yeah… we don’t either. But a few excellent time-tested products pop up out of the woodwork from time to time, and a traditional dual bell alarm clock does the trick. The hands move silently while you sleep, and buzz like a mother when it’s time to rise and shine. If you’re like us, you’re sometimes bothered by LED flashing you in the face all night. With Peakeep Twin Bell Stereoscopic Clock, you simply touch the button to activate the stereoscopic dial backlight, check the time, and they cop-out for another fifteen minutes. Don’t worry – Peakeep will wake you up.
Place Sense by Hello on your bedside table, and it will help you fall asleep, stay asleep, and wake up without the grogginess or fatigue you may be used to. The small, white orb plays ambient noises to help ease you into dreamland, and a small monitor clipped to your pillow tracks your movements throughout the night, and sends feedback to an app on your smartphone. By monitoring your sleep cycles, the alarm knows the best time to wake you up in the morning so you're feeling refreshed.
This farmhouse wall clock measures 36 in. across This farmhouse wall clock measures 36 in. across the face and features horizontal cedar wood slats a white distressed finish hand painted black Roman numerals in a Poster Condensed font and an inner accent ring with individual hour marks. It includes a high torque quartz movement antique-style spade hands and ...  More + Product Details Close

Antique styling in a two-tone wall clock features a Worn Black finish with red undertones and a contrasting Antique Red inset panel. Beneath a convex glass crystal, the dial features an Antique Red background with gold Arabic numerals and aged brass-tone spade hands. The wood stick pendulum features a spun brass-finished bob. Finished in Worn Black on select materials, hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement.
The next development in accuracy occurred after 1656 with the invention of the pendulum clock. Galileo had the idea to use a swinging bob to regulate the motion of a time-telling device earlier in the 17th century. Christiaan Huygens, however, is usually credited as the inventor. He determined the mathematical formula that related pendulum length to time (about 99.4 cm or 39.1 inches for the one second movement) and had the first pendulum-driven clock made. The first model clock was built in 1657 in the Hague, but it was in England that the idea was taken up.[38] The longcase clock (also known as the grandfather clock) was created to house the pendulum and works by the English clockmaker William Clement in 1670 or 1671. It was also at this time that clock cases began to be made of wood and clock faces to utilize enamel as well as hand-painted ceramics.
“Great little dual alarm clock. Super easy to set the two alarms. Easy to use. It has a night light feature with adjustable dimmer, which is great. You can adjust the display completely dark so you don’t see the numbers. Then you can just hit the snooze button when the alarm is not ringing and the display lights up. It’s powered only by 3 AA batteries: no electric cord, no USB, nothing that you need. If you need a fancy alarm clock that sprays water in your face, this is not it.”
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