“The alarm is loud with a lower frequency melody which I like since I have high-frequency hearing loss. Guaranteed to wake anyone up when the alarm goes off which is super important to me, especially if I’m using the alarm clock to wake up to catch a flight. … When the alarm goes off, press the large snooze bar on the top to have the alarm go off again in five minutes. Pressing the snooze bar on top at anytime also lights up the numbers and bars on the clock’s face, but the hands are a bit hard to see in the dark since the hands don’t light up. When the alarm on/off switch is turned to the off position, there’s a cute voice that says ‘Good Morning!’ which brings a smile to start the day. We love this clock so much, we plan to buy more to give as gifts. We’re sure the recipients will love it as much as we do.”
This farmhouse wall clock measures 24 in. across This farmhouse wall clock measures 24 in. across the face and features horizontal cedar wood slats a white distressed finish hand painted black Roman numerals in a Poster Condensed font and an inner accent ring with individual hour marks. It includes a high torque quartz movement antique-style spade hands and ...  More + Product Details Close
Bring an earthy touch to your walls with this understated clock, a rustic accent for your space. Featuring a paneled distressed wood design with metal Roman numerals in a distressed gray finish, this clock brings a neutral touch to your look. Measuring at 27.5" x 27.5, this clock fits over any console or mantel space. Upkeep is easy—just wipe clean with a damp cloth—and install a AA battery (not included) to operate.
During the 15th and 16th centuries, clockmaking flourished, particularly in the metalworking towns of Nuremberg and Augsburg, and in Blois, France. Some of the more basic table clocks have only one time-keeping hand, with the dial between the hour markers being divided into four equal parts making the clocks readable to the nearest 15 minutes. Other clocks were exhibitions of craftsmanship and skill, incorporating astronomical indicators and musical movements. The cross-beat escapement was invented in 1584 by Jost Bürgi, who also developed the remontoire. Bürgi's clocks were a great improvement in accuracy as they were correct to within a minute a day.[35][36] These clocks helped the 16th-century astronomer Tycho Brahe to observe astronomical events with much greater precision than before.[citation needed][how?]
In China, a striking clock was devised by the Buddhist monk and inventor Yi Xing (683–727).[5] The Chinese engineers Zhang Sixun and Su Song integrated striking clock mechanisms in astronomical clocks in the 10th and 11th centuries, respectively.[6] A striking clock outside of China was the water-powered clock tower near the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, Syria, which struck once every hour. It was constructed by the Arab engineer al-Kaysarani in 1154. In 1235, an early monumental water-powered alarm clock that "announced the appointed hours of prayer and the time both by day and by night" was completed in the entrance hall of the Mustansiriya Madrasah in Baghdad.[7]
Simple clocks intended mainly for notification were installed in towers, and did not always require faces or hands. They would have announced the canonical hours or intervals between set times of prayer. Canonical hours varied in length as the times of sunrise and sunset shifted. The more sophisticated astronomical clocks would have had moving dials or hands, and would have shown the time in various time systems, including Italian hours, canonical hours, and time as measured by astronomers at the time. Both styles of clock started acquiring extravagant features such as automata.
More than just a tool for keeping track of the time, this eye-catching wall clock helps turn any empty wall into an artful display. Crafted from injection plastic finished in a sleek metallic tone, it features a circular center with rods all around extending to stage the numbers of an analog dial. Measuring 16'' in diameter, it makes a statement on your kitchen or entryway wall without dominating the decor.

Get up one minute earlier each and every day. We have biological clocks; it’s not just some weird term we use. Time doesn’t exist. I’m not going to get all existential on you and make you contemplate your place in the universe, because you already know what that is—being the version of you that gets up earlier. Your body needs time to adjust, and if you can wean into it like this, in a month, you’ll be waking up a half-hour early.

Some water clock designs were developed independently and some knowledge was transferred through the spread of trade. Pre-modern societies do not have the same precise timekeeping requirements that exist in modern industrial societies, where every hour of work or rest is monitored, and work may start or finish at any time regardless of external conditions. Instead, water clocks in ancient societies were used mainly for astrological reasons. These early water clocks were calibrated with a sundial. While never reaching the level of accuracy of a modern timepiece, the water clock was the most accurate and commonly used timekeeping device for millennia, until it was replaced by the more accurate pendulum clock in 17th-century Europe.

Some predecessors to the modern clock may be considered as "clocks" that are based on movement in nature: A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a flat surface. There is a range of duration timers, a well-known example being the hourglass. Water clocks, along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments. A major advance occurred with the invention of the verge escapement, which made possible the first mechanical clocks around 1300 in Europe, which kept time with oscillating timekeepers like balance wheels.[1][2][3][4]
Molded by mid-century modern style, this 38" wall clock brings a bit of bold flair to any space in your home. Its generous size helps it grab glances (and compliments!) from guests, while its open and numberless design gives it a minimalist feel. Crafted from metal, this round silhouette sports a gold finish with silver-finished hands in the center for subtle contrast. Two AA batteries (not included) are required to operate.
In mechanical clocks, the power source is typically either a weight suspended from a cord or chain wrapped around a pulley, sprocket or drum; or a spiral spring called a mainspring. Mechanical clocks must be wound periodically, usually by turning a knob or key or by pulling on the free end of the chain, to store energy in the weight or spring to keep the clock running.

Tired of the same old clock hanging on your wall? Is the incessant ticking of the time a constant reminder you need to change it out? Purchase a new wall clock from our great selection. All of Zazzle's wall clock designs are printed in full color, so the design you choose will look vibrant for a long time. Not only can you choose from our great designs, you can also pick whether you want a round, square, or aqua clock to help keep track of time. Browse through the collection to find a clock you'll love every second and every minute!
This special 82nd Anniversary Edition Contemporary wall clock is one our more popular pendulum chiming wall clocks and features a white dial with black Roman numerals and a brushed nickel bezel. A spun nickel pendulum bob is suspended in front of a mirrored back. Finished in Black Satin. One Year Warranty. Quartz, triple chime Harmonic movement plays your choice of Westminster, Ave Maria, or Bim-Bam chimes with volume control and automatic nighttime chime shut-off option.

“Great little dual alarm clock. Super easy to set the two alarms. Easy to use. It has a night light feature with adjustable dimmer, which is great. You can adjust the display completely dark so you don’t see the numbers. Then you can just hit the snooze button when the alarm is not ringing and the display lights up. It’s powered only by 3 AA batteries: no electric cord, no USB, nothing that you need. If you need a fancy alarm clock that sprays water in your face, this is not it.”
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