Incorporating clocks into your home design is a way to better keep track of time and can make a unique style statement in your home. Clocks work well in every room of your home, from the living room to the bedroom. You can find wall clocks, mantel clocks, grandfather clocks and outdoor clocks that fit your personal style. Large wall clocks look beautiful in your home and are elegant focal piece in your living room. Make sure that you match the style and texture of your clock to the décor in your home. You can use stylish clocks in your home to accessorize thematic designs and emphasize specific areas of your home.
Clockmakers developed their art in various ways. Building smaller clocks was a technical challenge, as was improving accuracy and reliability. Clocks could be impressive showpieces to demonstrate skilled craftsmanship, or less expensive, mass-produced items for domestic use. The escapement in particular was an important factor affecting the clock's accuracy, so many different mechanisms were tried.
This looks like a Death Star droid out of a Star Wars movie, but it gets the job done with the tricks up its sleeve. Charge your phone and your tablet at the same time with two power outlets and two USB ports. The alarm clock feature is simple, and while it also projects your tunes via Bluetooth audio, it comes with a surge protector. That’s right; no freak lightning storm is allowed to hold you back. CubieBlue Charging Bluetooth Speaker is still going to work when you plug it back in (even if you threw it across the room).
The origin of the all-mechanical escapement clock is unknown; the first such devices may have been invented and used in monasteries to toll a bell that called the monks to prayers. The first mechanical clocks to which clear references exist were large, weight-driven machines fitted into towers and known today as turret clocks. These early devices struck only the hours and did not have hands or a dial.
"love it...Not bad...The alarm clock is one of the best I have had, the kids enjoy the extra interactions, and having music anywhere without having to connect my phone to a speaker has been wonderful....I just broadcast a message to them and a glass of water appears in my room LOL I like that it can be controlled from the clock or my phone, so no matter when I am I can broadcast or turn their music down"

Inspired by a vintage bicycle wheel, this awesome Oversized Kennan Metal 26.8" Wall Clock lends a touch of industrial chic style to your walls. This factory-chic timekeeper features rusted Arabic numerals, classic black spade hands on a battery-operated rusted gear movement, and gleaming metal wheel spoke accents. Create a factory-chic focal point in your dining room by mounting this piece on the wall over a reclaimed wood sideboard for guests to admire at your next dinner party or add it to...
If it has the iHome name attached to it, you know it’s going to be flashy. Their Bluetooth color changing clock hits home on all the necessary marks, allowing you to talk and end phone conversations with the touch of a button, as well as the five multiple LED color settings. It isn’t all about waking up in the morning; this alarm clock has you ready to go with a fully charged iPhone, fed sweet, sweet energy while you sleep. The last alarm clock you’ll ever need is staring you right in the face – it’s time to complete your iHome collection in style.
Keep time in style with this traditional tabletop clock, a great way to round out a decorative vignette while adding essential function. Crafted from wood and metal, this circular design sits atop a curved base and pairs an antique dial with a deep red finish. The glass-inlaid clock face sports glow-in-the-dark hands, so you can check the time in the wee hours and early evening, while a quartz movement keeps this design tickin’ and tockin’. Requires a battery.
If the last thing you do before closing your eyes for the night is pick up your cell phone to set the alarm, how likely is it that you're just going to do that one thing, then set the phone down on the nightstand? Admit it, you're probably going to check your Instagram, send a text or two, play just one more round of your favorite game, or surf the web.
Clock radios are powered by AC power from the wall socket. In the event of a power interruption, older electronic digital models used to reset the time to midnight (00:00) and lose alarm settings. This would cause failure to trigger the alarm even if the power is restored. To solve this issue, they trigger the alarm at 00:01 after a reset, so that at least the user is able to correct the clock and alarm settings. Most of the recent clock radios use a battery backup to maintain the time and alarm settings. Some advanced radio clocks (not to be confused with clocks with AM/FM radios) have a feature which sets the time automatically using signals from atomic clock-synced time signal radio stations such as WWV, making the clock accurate and immune to time reset due to power interruptions.
If you've moved away from using a clock completely and instead set an alarm on your phone, consider the SmartShaker by iLuv. The device slides under your pillow and shakes you awake when your phone alarm goes off (it connects wirelessly using bluetooth). You can also have the device sound an audible alarm. The battery lasts a full month before needing to be charged.
The iHome has more in common with a sound system than an alarm clock, but this all-in-one device is perfect for anyone who’s looking to declutter their nightstand on a budget. Along with having a good alarm clock to wake you up every morning, the iHome also features Bluetooth connectivity and FM radio, meaning you’ll no longer have to deal with pesky USB chargers before you go to bed. The translucent cabinet and display changes color with the touch of a button, so you can wake up to your favorite colors.
Some clocks, usually digital ones, include an optical projector that shines a magnified image of the time display onto a screen or onto a surface such as an indoor ceiling or wall. The digits are large enough to be easily read, without using glasses, by persons with moderately imperfect vision, so the clocks are convenient for use in their bedrooms. Usually, the timekeeping circuitry has a battery as a backup source for an uninterrupted power supply to keep the clock on time, while the projection light only works when the unit is connected to an A.C. supply. Completely battery-powered portable versions resembling flashlights are also available.
As of the 2010s, atomic clocks are the most accurate clocks in existence. They are considerably more accurate than quartz clocks as they can be accurate to within a few seconds over thousands of years.[54] Atomic clocks were first theorized by Lord Kelvin in 1879.[55] In the 1930s the development of Magnetic resonance created practical method for doing this.[56] A prototype ammonia maser device was built in 1949 at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS, now NIST). Although it was less accurate than existing quartz clocks, it served to demonstrate the concept.[57][58][59] The first accurate atomic clock, a caesium standard based on a certain transition of the caesium-133 atom, was built by Louis Essen in 1955 at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK.[60] Calibration of the caesium standard atomic clock was carried out by the use of the astronomical time scale ephemeris time (ET).[61] As of 2013, the most stable atomic clocks are ytterbium clocks, which are stable to within less than two parts in 1 quintillion (2×10−18).[62]
Traditional mechanical alarm clocks have one or two bells that ring by means of a mainspring that powers a gear to propel a hammer back and forth between the two bells or between the interior sides of a single bell. In some models, the back encasement of the clock itself acts as the bell. In an electric bell-style alarm clock, the bell is rung by an electromagnetic circuit and armature that turns the circuit on and off repeatedly.[1]
The timekeeping element of a quartz clock consists of a ring of quartz about 2.5 inches (63.5 mm) in diameter, suspended by threads and enclosed in a heat-insulated chamber. Electrodes are attached to the surfaces of the ring and connected to an electrical circuit in such a manner as to sustain oscillations. Since the frequency of vibration, 100,000-hertz, is too high for convenient time measurement, it is reduced by a process known as frequency division or demultiplication and applied to a synchronous motor connected to a clock dial through mechanical gearing. If a 100,000 hertz frequency, for example, is subjected to a combined electrical and mechanical gearing reduction of 6,000,000 to 1, then the second hand of the synchronous clock will make exactly one rotation in 60 seconds. The vibrations are so regular that the maximum error of an observatory quartz-crystal clock is only a few ten-thousandths of a second per day, equivalent to an error of one second every 10 years.
By the time that phone hits the nightstand, you've lost precious sleep time, you've tricked your brain into thinking it's wake-up time instead of dream time, because the glow of the blue light emitted by your phone reduces your body's release of melatonin, the hormone that regulates your sleep cycle. Instead of relaxing, you've stimulated your mind. All of that adds up to poor quality sleep followed by a groggy, foggy, "I don't know why I'm so tired," kind of morning.

The Howard Miller 613-229 Alcott offers an impressive pediment featuring a sculptured cove and enlarged dentil molding. An off-white Roman numeral dial features a solid brass bezel and decorative accents between the numerals. Hinged front door with latch. A polished and raised brass pendulum with grid and polished chime rods add a distinctive touch to the interior. Finished in Cherry Bordeaux on select hardwoods and veneers. German made Keinenger Key-wound, quarter hour Westminster chime movement with hour count. Chime silence lever and durable bronze bushings. One Year warranty and Free Shipping.
This colorful tabletop clock is the perfect addition for any desk, table, or shelf! Crafted of plastic in a rich red finish, this clock showcases a round case with a silver bezel on a rectangular pedestal base measuring 5.5" H x 5.5" W x 2" D overall. The easy-to-read dial features black Arabic numerals over an off-white face, while a battery-operated movement keeps Art Deco-inspired hour, minute, and second hands in time. Rounding out the design, a programmable alarm gets you up in the morning.
More than just a time teller, oversized wall clocks create an eye-catching centerpiece in any ensemble while helping define your space’s aesthetic. Take this one for example: made from iron, it’s the perfect pick for any modern farmhouse-inspired decor. It strikes a circular silhouette and has an open and airy feel. Roman numeral accents line the periphery while two spade hands keep tabs on the time. It measures 30'' W x 30'' H x 1'' D and is operated by AA batteries.

“Great alarm clock for the price. Gigantic numbers for my old eyes. Very basic, easy to set, just what I wanted. Alarm is loud even on low [with] an awful sound that would wake the dead. But that sound makes me get right up, so it does exactly what it’s supposed to do. If you want a soft gentle caress to wake you, get something else, but this is a good alarm and easy to use.”

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