Here is a clock that will look great in any room in the house and it never needs a plug! This Water Clock is powered by ordinary tap water. Never needs batteries or electricity. Just fill this Water clock with water and you are on your way to more eco-friendly home. After about 6 months to a year you may need to dump the water out (your can pour it into a plant) and refill. The clock will remember the time as you do so. It even has an alarm. Great for traveling as well. Why would you ever use...
This lovely wall clock brings casual elegance and familiar charm to your home. Brimming with country style, this design pairs perfectly with items like vintage decor and whitewashed accents. The round design and the bold black Roman numeral numbering give this piece a touch of traditional appeal, while the beige frame with distressed detailing anchors this piece in cottage-chic style. It also showcases the typographic motif on the white face reading “Lotion Gargelle 1797” for added antiqued...

The Howard Miller Arendal II 625-551 Wall Clock is a long version of the ever popular Arendal Quartz Wall Clock. This tall, elongated 49" high wall clock features carved accents and a turned urn finial which complement the unique style. The aged dial offers black Roman numerals and decorative black hands. The long, wooden stick pendulum features an antique-brass spun bob which swings back and forth and is battery operated like all quartz clocks. The wooden stick swinging pendulum features an antique-brass spun bob. Quartz, triple-chime Harmonic movement plays choice of full Westminster or Ave Maria chimes with strike on the hour with 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 chimes accordingly or switch to hourly only. Bim Bam chime on the hour only. One year warranty and Free Shipping.


In 1815, Francis Ronalds published the first electric clock powered by dry pile batteries.[48] Alexander Bain, Scottish clockmaker, patented the electric clock in 1840. The electric clock's mainspring is wound either with an electric motor or with an electromagnet and armature. In 1841, he first patented the electromagnetic pendulum. By the end of the nineteenth century, the advent of the dry cell battery made it feasible to use electric power in clocks. Spring or weight driven clocks that use electricity, either alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC), to rewind the spring or raise the weight of a mechanical clock would be classified as an electromechanical clock. This classification would also apply to clocks that employ an electrical impulse to propel the pendulum. In electromechanical clocks the electricity serves no time keeping function. These types of clocks were made as individual timepieces but more commonly used in synchronized time installations in schools, businesses, factories, railroads and government facilities as a master clock and slave clocks.
“I am the heaviest sleeper and was setting four or five alarms on my phone to wake me up. After being late a few times, I decided to purchase this alarm clock to help me wake up on time. I couldn’t be happier with my purchase. … The bed shaker is super important. I put it under my pillow, and it shook me awake; the loud beep helped too. If you can sleep through earthquakes and shouting family members, this is the alarm clock for you.”
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