Add a dash of visual intrigue and stylish sophistication to your ensemble with this eye-catching wall clock, the perfect piece for your well-curated aesthetic. Hang it up on a deep blue or charcoal-toned wall in the living room to complement its shimmering silver finish and hard-lined metal design, then offset its striking starburst silhouette by arranging a console table below with glossy ceramic vases and simple metal picture frames. Curating a midcentury-modern aesthetic in your space? Lean...
As stylish as it is functional, this lovely clock lends a touch of charm and classic appeal to your tabletop display. A traditional design, it showcases a rounded frame with a pedestal base and a solid black finish. The neutral-toned clock face is accented with black Roman numeral numbering and three thin black hands. Crafted from plastic, it is a budget-friendly choice. It also features a beeping alarm for added convenience.

Greek astronomer Andronicus of Cyrrhus supervised the construction of the Tower of the Winds in Athens in the 1st century B.C.[11] The Greek and Roman civilizations are credited for initially advancing water clock design to include complex gearing, which was connected to fanciful automata and also resulted in improved accuracy. These advances were passed on through Byzantium and Islamic times, eventually making their way back to Europe. Independently, the Chinese developed their own advanced water clocks(水鐘)in 725 A.D., passing their ideas on to Korea and Japan.
During the 15th and 16th centuries, clockmaking flourished, particularly in the metalworking towns of Nuremberg and Augsburg, and in Blois, France. Some of the more basic table clocks have only one time-keeping hand, with the dial between the hour markers being divided into four equal parts making the clocks readable to the nearest 15 minutes. Other clocks were exhibitions of craftsmanship and skill, incorporating astronomical indicators and musical movements. The cross-beat escapement was invented in 1584 by Jost Bürgi, who also developed the remontoire. Bürgi's clocks were a great improvement in accuracy as they were correct to within a minute a day.[35][36] These clocks helped the 16th-century astronomer Tycho Brahe to observe astronomical events with much greater precision than before.[citation needed][how?]

While an analog dial makes it easy, this clock is certainly not just for telling time! Let its colorful frame imbue a sense of playful appeal into your lodge-inspired living room look, lovely sitting atop your mantel as the fire flickers down below. Whether you're lounging on the sofa after a spirited skiing session or simply warming up with a steaming mug of hot cocoa, you can't go wrong by making the whole room shine with an antler-adorned chandelier hanging overhead and tying it all together...
With this collection's award-winning and patented Smart Set technology, the flashing "12:00" display is a thing of the past. The digital tuning clock radio automatically sets itself on the first use to the correct year, month, date, day, and time. The clock radio features a large and easy-to-read LED display. The alarm can be programmed to operate on weekdays only, weekends only, or all seven days of the week. The alarm displays the month and date with the touch of a button. Set the alarm to...

In a master clock system, electricity is used to give direct impulses to the pendulum, which in turn causes the clock’s gear train to move, or to lift a lever after it has imparted an impulse to the pendulum. In various modern master clocks the pendulum operates a light count wheel that turns through the pitch of one tooth every double swing and is arranged to release a lever every half minute. This lever gives an impulse to the pendulum and is then restored to its original position by an electromagnet. The pulse of current that operates the electromagnet can also be transmitted to a series of distant dials, or slave clocks, advancing the hands of each through the space of a half minute. Thus, a master clock can control scores of dials in a large group of buildings, as well as such other apparatus as time recorders and sirens.
Don't worry, Zeus didn't show up to your home, but you'll certainly feel that way when waking up to this unit's thunderous, 113-decibel buzzing. Fair warning: It's definitely loud, so it's a good pick only if you're a heavy, heavy sleeper. Just in case the noise somehow isn't enough to pry you out of bed, this alarm clock flashes multiple bright red LEDs and comes with a bed shaker that'll really get you going. Trust us, if that sensory overload doesn't get the job done, nothing will.
More than just a tool for keeping track of the time, this eye-catching wall clock helps turn any empty wall into an artful display. Crafted from injection plastic finished in a sleek metallic tone, it features a circular center with rods all around extending to stage the numbers of an analog dial. Measuring 16'' in diameter, it makes a statement on your kitchen or entryway wall without dominating the decor.
The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–348 BC) was said to possess a large water clock with an unspecified alarm signal similar to the sound of a water organ; he used it at night, possibly for signaling the beginning of his lectures at dawn (Athenaeus 4.174c).[2] The Hellenistic engineer and inventor Ctesibius (fl. 285–222 BC) fitted his clepsydras with dial and pointer for indicating the time, and added elaborate "alarm systems, which could be made to drop pebbles on a gong, or blow trumpets (by forcing bell-jars down into water and taking the compressed air through a beating reed) at pre-set times" (Vitruv 11.11).[3]
“I was looking for a small, battery-operated clock with a light for my bedside. I wake often in the middle of the night, and I do not keep my cell phone beside the bed (bad idea, as it is tempting to use it, and that does not help sleep). I had a small battery-operated clock I purchased from Walmart years ago, and it finally broke after being knocked off the bedside table too many times. … So I looked on Amazon, and this is the best replacement I could find. It is slightly larger but does the job. I push the top button and can see the time without waking my partner. Nice little clock for the price, and if I knock it off during the night and break it, it has not broken my budget!”
×