The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]
Bring an earthy touch to your walls with this understated clock, a rustic accent for your space. Featuring a paneled distressed wood design with metal Roman numerals in a distressed gray finish, this clock brings a neutral touch to your look. Measuring at 27.5" x 27.5, this clock fits over any console or mantel space. Upkeep is easy—just wipe clean with a damp cloth—and install a AA battery (not included) to operate.
Stay punctual with an alarm clock! They are great for waking you up in the morning or simply reminding you of special events. These items are a household must-have! Perfect for bedside nightstands, most alarm clocks feature a built-in FM radio to enjoy your favorite radio station, as well as a snooze button for when you need 5 to 10 minutes more sleep. iHome? clock radios have dock for MP3 players to listen to music through the speakers. Choose from a variety of unique, creative designs that are great for virtually any d‚cor.
Sony always makes good products, and this little cube packs a powerful alarm in its punch. When you go for the minimalist design, you’re able to incorporate more features for less money, as well as keep the nature of the product intact: in this case, it’s supposed to wake you up, and not be too flashy. You get a backup battery just in case the power fails you during a storm, but you also get ten programmable radio station buttons.
This colorful tabletop clock is the perfect addition for any desk, table, or shelf! Crafted of plastic in a rich red finish, this clock showcases a round case with a silver bezel on a rectangular pedestal base measuring 5.5" H x 5.5" W x 2" D overall. The easy-to-read dial features black Arabic numerals over an off-white face, while a battery-operated movement keeps Art Deco-inspired hour, minute, and second hands in time. Rounding out the design, a programmable alarm gets you up in the morning.
Bring elegant, antique style to your walls with this 23.25" wall clock. Crafted of manufactured wood and plastic, this clock’s dial showcases large Arabic numerals printed in weathered beige over the hand-painted royal red face. A battery-operated movement keeps spade hour and minute hands ticking away in time over the words “Hotel Westminster” and “Pairs Rue de la Paix” written in swirling cursive script. Distressed details and fleur-de-lis accents round out the design, imbuing a...
The first precise timekeeping mechanism, whose principles of motion were discovered by Galileo, was the simple pendulum (see below). The accuracy of modern timekeeping has been improved dramatically by the introduction of tiny quartz crystals, whose harmonic oscillations generate electrical signals that may be incorporated into miniaturized circuits…
In 1815, Francis Ronalds published the first electric clock powered by dry pile batteries.[48] Alexander Bain, Scottish clockmaker, patented the electric clock in 1840. The electric clock's mainspring is wound either with an electric motor or with an electromagnet and armature. In 1841, he first patented the electromagnetic pendulum. By the end of the nineteenth century, the advent of the dry cell battery made it feasible to use electric power in clocks. Spring or weight driven clocks that use electricity, either alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC), to rewind the spring or raise the weight of a mechanical clock would be classified as an electromechanical clock. This classification would also apply to clocks that employ an electrical impulse to propel the pendulum. In electromechanical clocks the electricity serves no time keeping function. These types of clocks were made as individual timepieces but more commonly used in synchronized time installations in schools, businesses, factories, railroads and government facilities as a master clock and slave clocks.

“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”

×