Wall clocks both help you keep time and accent your space as decor that fills an empty wall space above the mantel or kitchen counter. For a clock that serves dual purposes, consider a numberless option—the minimalist look doesn't exude obvious functionality, but the time is still obvious and the clock works as a unique piece of hanging wall art—perfect for the living room or dining room. If you're not necessarily looking to make a bold style statement but still want a chic timepiece, embossed clocks fit the bill. The numbers add interest and dimension and keep the clock looking artful—another great option for the dining room or kitchen. For a family-friendly clock, look for large faces and clean-lined, easy-to-read numbering. With form and function in perfect accordance, this type also fits in beautifully on a bedroom wall. Don't forget about the home office, where time is of the essence. Minimalist designs in handsome walnut and sleek iron can add either a throwback or modern feel to the space. Wall clocks of all designs not only keep you, your family and your guests aware of the time, but also serve as great decorative elements to your home.
“This little beauty works great. I bought it when the alarm on my mobile phone began to intermittently fail me. This little travel clock is beautiful in retro seafoam green and great for travel because its bright color ensures that you will never miss picking it up from your hotel nightstand at checkout. There is a faint, pleasant ticking, the hands glow in the dark, and the nightlight button is bright when needed. The pop-up alarm button is firm and works well though I am learning not to accidentally press it and turn the alarm off when picking up the clock. Overall, a fantastic alarm clock.”

Bring an earthy touch to your walls with this understated clock, a rustic accent for your space. Featuring a paneled distressed wood design with metal Roman numerals in a distressed gray finish, this clock brings a neutral touch to your look. Measuring at 27.5" x 27.5, this clock fits over any console or mantel space. Upkeep is easy—just wipe clean with a damp cloth—and install a AA battery (not included) to operate.
About 1581 Galileo noticed the characteristic timekeeping property of the pendulum. The Dutch astronomer and physicist Christiaan Huygens was responsible for the practical application of the pendulum as a time controller in clocks from 1656 onward. Huygens’s invention brought about a great increase in the importance and extent of clock making. Clocks, weight-driven and with short pendulums, were encased in wood and made to hang on the wall, but these new eight-day wall clocks had very heavy weights, and many fell off weak plaster walls and were destroyed. The next step was to extend the case to the floor, and the grandfather clock was born. In 1670 the long, or seconds, pendulum was introduced by English clock makers with the anchor escapement.
In Europe, between 1280 and 1320, there is an increase in the number of references to clocks and horologes in church records, and this probably indicates that a new type of clock mechanism had been devised. Existing clock mechanisms that used water power were being adapted to take their driving power from falling weights. This power was controlled by some form of oscillating mechanism, probably derived from existing bell-ringing or alarm devices. This controlled release of power—the escapement—marks the beginning of the true mechanical clock, which differed from the previously mentioned cogwheel clocks. Verge escapement mechanism derived in the surge of true mechanical clocks, which didn't need any kind of fluid power, like water or mercury, to work.
A water-powered cogwheel clock was created in China in AD 725 by Yi Xing and Liang Lingzan. This is not considered an escapement mechanism clock as it was unidirectional, the Song dynasty polymath and genius Su Song (1020–1101) incorporated it into his monumental innovation of the astronomical clock-tower of Kaifeng in 1088.[19][page needed] His astronomical clock and rotating armillary sphere still relied on the use of either flowing water during the spring, summer, autumn seasons and liquid mercury during the freezing temperature of winter (i.e. hydraulics). A mercury clock, described in the Libros del saber, a Spanish work from 1277 consisting of translations and paraphrases of Arabic works, is sometimes quoted as evidence for Muslim knowledge of a mechanical clock. A mercury-powered cogwheel clock was created by Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi[20][21]
Howard Miller 625-613 Company Time II Large Wall Clock is a 34" wall clock with an antique nickel frame. The center dial is a bubbled panel that is heavily distressed and deeply dented for an aged appearance. The individual off-white number panels are curved and dented with Black Roman numerals centered on each panel. The accurate quartz movement requires one "AA" battery. Always measure your area to make sure the wall you have will accommodate this large of clock. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping.
The Mood Light Dual Radio with Nature Sounds Tabletop Clock will literally brighten your day with its color changing led and an easy-to-read 0.7” blue led display, and easy access top mounted touch controls. This model has a lot of unique features that set it apart from other clock radios, such as soothing nature sounds (brook/bubbles/forest), a multi-color led mood lamp and built-in 1 AMP charging port for charging your phone while you sleep. You can listen to your favorite FM or connect...
“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
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