Don't worry, Zeus didn't show up to your home, but you'll certainly feel that way when waking up to this unit's thunderous, 113-decibel buzzing. Fair warning: It's definitely loud, so it's a good pick only if you're a heavy, heavy sleeper. Just in case the noise somehow isn't enough to pry you out of bed, this alarm clock flashes multiple bright red LEDs and comes with a bed shaker that'll really get you going. Trust us, if that sensory overload doesn't get the job done, nothing will.

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Don't worry, Zeus didn't show up to your home, but you'll certainly feel that way when waking up to this unit's thunderous, 113-decibel buzzing. Fair warning: It's definitely loud, so it's a good pick only if you're a heavy, heavy sleeper. Just in case the noise somehow isn't enough to pry you out of bed, this alarm clock flashes multiple bright red LEDs and comes with a bed shaker that'll really get you going. Trust us, if that sensory overload doesn't get the job done, nothing will.
Clocks have a secret life: they're responsible for much more than telling time. From pocket watches to grandfather clocks, a time piece has usually been used to make a statement about the owner as much as it has about the hour. With this clock, you can make a statement in rustic style. Featuring numerals in a lighter inset wood, this piece measures 29.75'' H x 29.75'' W x 2.38'' D. Because both the hands and wood are dark, we recommend displaying this piece in a well-lit area for easier...
Pairing a simple design with a contrasting black-and-silver palette, this eye-catching 12" wall clock instantly elevates your favorite aesthetic. Its round silhouette blends effortlessly into both casual or formal spaces, while its clean profile adds sophistication to your decor. Lean into this wall clock's versatility by adding it to a transitional living room arrangement alongside a mid-century-inspired sofa and gently-tufted barrel chairs for a cohesive seating space. Anchor the ensemble...
In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.
Now you can wake up to the sun without even opening your curtains. This alarm clock uses a gentle glow that simulates a sunrise, waking you gently and naturally, so you definitely won't want to murder it when it starts going off. Choose from five different calming sounds to pair with the gradual light for an all-around sensory experience, or just select the FM radio option (that you'll inevitably snooze once or twice).

Slave clocks, used in large institutions and schools from the 1860s to the 1970s, kept time with a pendulum, but were wired to a master clock in the building, and periodically received a signal to synchronize them with the master, often on the hour.[71] Later versions without pendulums were triggered by a pulse from the master clock and certain sequences used to force rapid synchronization following a power failure.


A silent instrument missing such a striking mechanism has traditionally been known as a timepiece.[5] In general usage today, a "clock" refers to any device for measuring and displaying the time. Watches and other timepieces that can be carried on one's person are often distinguished from clocks.[6] Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century. During the 15th and 16th centuries, clockmaking flourished. The next development in accuracy occurred after 1656 with the invention of the pendulum clock. A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The electric clock was patented in 1840. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all.
The pendulum is a reliable time measurer because, for small arcs, the time required for a complete swing (period) depends only on the length of the pendulum and is almost independent of the extent of the arc. The length of a pendulum with a period of one second is about 39 inches (990 mm), and an increase in length of 0.001 inch (0.025 mm) will make the clock lose about one second per day. Altering the length of a pendulum is therefore a sensitive means of regulation. The alteration is usually carried out by allowing the bob to rest upon a nut that can be screwed up or down the pendulum rod.

Any expansion or contraction of the rod caused by changes of temperature will affect the timekeeping of a pendulum; e.g., a pendulum clock with a steel rod will lose one second a day for a rise in temperature of approximately 4 °F (2.2 °C). For accurate timekeeping, the length of the pendulum must be kept as nearly constant as possible. This may be done in several ways, some of which use the differing coefficients of expansion (the amount of expansion per degree change in temperature) of different metals to obtain a cancelling-out effect. In one popular compensation method, the bob consists of a glass or metal jar containing a suitable amount of mercury. The gridiron pendulum employs rods of different metal, usually brass and steel, while in the zinc-iron tube the pendulum rod is made of concentric tubes of zinc and iron. An improved method, however, is to make the pendulum rod from a special alloy called Invar. This material has such a small coefficient of expansion that small changes of temperature have a negligible effect and can easily be compensated for if required.


A vintaged take on traditional style, this alarm clock brings time-honored style to any space, without breaking the bank. Crafted from metal, this analog alarm clock showcasing a round face sitting atop a molded base. Giving this piece a distinctive look is an antiqued face, outfitted with glow-in-the-dark hour and minute hands. Black and neutral hues round out this clock's color palette, accented with distressed details. Measured at under half-a-foot tall and wide, this lightweight clock is...
“I bought this light because my partner and I need to be up early for work, but our bedroom has very poor natural light. Within a week, I’ve already noticed a difference in my energy levels and mood. The sunrise simulation works perfectly; by the time the ‘alarm’ (peaceful bird noises) goes off, I’m already feeling naturally awake — not groggy or jolted out of my sleep. I feel much more rested, and my average resting heart rate reflects that. I also really love the sunset feature. I wasn’t expecting to get much use out of it, but I feel like it does a great job of helping me settle into bed at the end of the day.”
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