Amazon buyers love it as well: with more than 4,600 reviews, the clock has an average of 4.4 stars. Not only do most buyers comment that it easily awakens them even though they are heavy sleepers, but several hearing-impaired buyers also mentioned that even without the sound, the vibration and flashing lights were enough to wake them up. One customer summed it up well, "If you can sleep through this, then you may not be alive."
Besides the Chinese astronomical clock of Su Song in 1088 mentioned above, in Europe there were the clocks constructed by Richard of Wallingford in St Albans by 1336, and by Giovanni de Dondi in Padua from 1348 to 1364. They no longer exist, but detailed descriptions of their design and construction survive,[22][23] and modern reproductions have been made.[23] They illustrate how quickly the theory of the mechanical clock had been translated into practical constructions, and also that one of the many impulses to their development had been the desire of astronomers to investigate celestial phenomena.
The apparent position of the Sun in the sky moves over the course of each day, reflecting the rotation of the Earth. Shadows cast by stationary objects move correspondingly, so their positions can be used to indicate the time of day. A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a (usually) flat surface, which has markings that correspond to the hours.[7] Sundials can be horizontal, vertical, or in other orientations. Sundials were widely used in ancient times.[8] With the knowledge of latitude, a well-constructed sundial can measure local solar time with reasonable accuracy, within a minute or two. Sundials continued to be used to monitor the performance of clocks until the modern era.[citation needed]
The word horologia (from the Greek ὥρα, hour, and λέγειν, to tell) was used to describe early mechanical clocks,[15] but the use of this word (still used in several Romance languages) [16] for all timekeepers conceals the true nature of the mechanisms. For example, there is a record that in 1176 Sens Cathedral installed a ‘horologe’[17] but the mechanism used is unknown. According to Jocelin of Brakelond, in 1198 during a fire at the abbey of St Edmundsbury (now Bury St Edmunds), the monks 'ran to the clock' to fetch water, indicating that their water clock had a reservoir large enough to help extinguish the occasional fire.[18] The word clock (from the Celtic words clocca and clogan, both meaning "bell"), which gradually supersedes "horologe", suggests that it was the sound of bells which also characterized the prototype mechanical clocks that appeared during the 13th century in Europe.
In Europe, between 1280 and 1320, there is an increase in the number of references to clocks and horologes in church records, and this probably indicates that a new type of clock mechanism had been devised. Existing clock mechanisms that used water power were being adapted to take their driving power from falling weights. This power was controlled by some form of oscillating mechanism, probably derived from existing bell-ringing or alarm devices. This controlled release of power—the escapement—marks the beginning of the true mechanical clock, which differed from the previously mentioned cogwheel clocks. Verge escapement mechanism derived in the surge of true mechanical clocks, which didn't need any kind of fluid power, like water or mercury, to work.
If the last thing you do before closing your eyes for the night is pick up your cell phone to set the alarm, how likely is it that you're just going to do that one thing, then set the phone down on the nightstand? Admit it, you're probably going to check your Instagram, send a text or two, play just one more round of your favorite game, or surf the web.
Keep track of time and exude antiqued style with this bold 24-inch oversized wall clock. Crafted from metal and wood, this round analog clock operates on quartz crystal movement and is embellished with a white background and black needles. Roman numerals lend a traditional touch, and small geometric details add extra dimension to the piece. Use this piece to help create a chic French countryside aesthetic in your kitchen. Start by painting the walls a light gray or beige tone with white trim....
Health chose the Sonic Bomb as one of the best alarm clocks for heavy sleepers, commenting that the flashing lights, loud sound, and bed shaker should "deliver the full sensory message that grave danger awaits unless you get out of bed." Reviews.com likes it as well, although they aren't crazy about the appearance of the clock, claiming it looks like a gag gift. Still, they say, "It won us over with how effective and customizable it is."
The Homedics SoundSpa Digital FM Tabletop Clock with time projection gives you the power to create a soothing, relaxing sleep environment. Choose from eight peaceful relaxation sounds including ocean, white noise, brook, rainforest, thunder, rain, fan, campfire, or simply switch on the radio. The SoundSpa Digital FM Tabletop Clock comes with the option of time projection and a soothing blue light.
Antique styling in a two-tone wall clock features a Worn Black finish with red undertones and a contrasting Antique Red inset panel. Beneath a convex glass crystal, the dial features an Antique Red background with gold Arabic numerals and aged brass-tone spade hands. The wood stick pendulum features a spun brass-finished bob. Finished in Worn Black on select materials, hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement.
Traditional mechanical alarm clocks have one or two bells that ring by means of a mainspring that powers a gear to propel a hammer back and forth between the two bells or between the interior sides of a single bell. In some models, the back encasement of the clock itself acts as the bell. In an electric bell-style alarm clock, the bell is rung by an electromagnetic circuit and armature that turns the circuit on and off repeatedly.[1]

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This massive iron wall clock is 49" in diameter and is finished in off-white with an antique nickel outer ring that is moderately distressed and dented for an aged appearance. Black Roman numerals are centered on individual antique off-white panels. Quartz, battery-operated movement requires one AA sized battery. Some assembly is required. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
Wall clocks both help you keep time and accent your space as decor that fills an empty wall space above the mantel or kitchen counter. For a clock that serves dual purposes, consider a numberless option—the minimalist look doesn't exude obvious functionality, but the time is still obvious and the clock works as a unique piece of hanging wall art—perfect for the living room or dining room. If you're not necessarily looking to make a bold style statement but still want a chic timepiece, embossed clocks fit the bill. The numbers add interest and dimension and keep the clock looking artful—another great option for the dining room or kitchen. For a family-friendly clock, look for large faces and clean-lined, easy-to-read numbering. With form and function in perfect accordance, this type also fits in beautifully on a bedroom wall. Don't forget about the home office, where time is of the essence. Minimalist designs in handsome walnut and sleek iron can add either a throwback or modern feel to the space. Wall clocks of all designs not only keep you, your family and your guests aware of the time, but also serve as great decorative elements to your home.
A clock accent and 9 metal gears make this vintaged wall decor a statement-making addition to any room. Hang it in the den for a rustic-chic focal point or add it to a cluster of canvas prints for a dynamic gallery display. Nothing adorns your living space like a lavish timepiece, and with the Chellis Wall Clock you are sure to receive a lot of compliments. Intricately designed, this clock is an eye-catching piece that will elevate the beauty of your decor manifold. A rustic and cutting-edge...
Mixing modern minimalism with industrial influence, this round 28" wall clock is as much a decorative accent as it is a practical timepiece. Crafted from metal, it showcases sizable Roman numerals and small spade-style hands to help you keep an eye on the hour. Its black and gold finish gives it an antiqued appearance, while its open design ensures it won’t overwhelm your arrangement. This piece requires two AA batteries (not included) to operate.

The Howard Miller Clé Du Ville 625-579 Large Wall Clock is a 26.25" diameter oversize gallery wall clock features an antique dial within a wrought iron frame with an oil rubbed bronze finish. The aged parchment background includes names of well-known French cities faded in the background. Applied vintage antique key hour markers and spade hands finished in oil rubbed bronze complement the frame. Quartz battery-operated movement requires one AA battery. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
Don't settle for a simple wall clock to merely ensure you’re on time. Bring both function and French flair to your space with this oversized 29" oval wall clock. Made from manufactured wood, it showcases a typographic motif in the center that reads "Antiquite de Paris 1887" for a dash of antique inspiration. Classic Roman numerals and spade-style hands help you keep an eye on the hour, while a distressed finish completes the design with well-worn charm. Once you pop in a battery (not...
"Love it...Love it....Just a basic alarm clock needed one to check that my FM transmitter is on the correct frequency one that had a digital tuner fits the bill just fine and a battery back up clock for time announcements ....What can I say, it's a quality alarm, that never fails, and is not expensive Not once has this alarm failed to wake me up, Digits are bright and easy to see If I were to say something negative, The time is a little too fast (in a month you'll notice your like a minute or two ahead of the actual time, easy fix though) And the radio connection needs to better"
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