A. Many modern alarm clocks are designed to stimulate the natural wake and sleep cycle of the body. Clocks with sunlight simulation help give the body visual cues that it’s time to wake up. Clocks with progressive alarms provide gentle auditory cues. When the body has a chance to wake slowly, it can better prepare for the day, which may help you you feel more rested.
“This was a gift for my elderly, cognitively impaired mother. She was very often confused as to which day it was, the time of day, etc. She would show up at appointments on the wrong day, or think it was morning when it was evening. This clock is fantastic! It has made such a difference. Now she always knows what day and time it is. The clock is also very nice-looking. This was an excellent purchase and highly recommended. I can’t say enough good things about it.”
A well-made large wall clock that looks good and runs smoothly can add charm and functionality to any space. For a fresh take on the traditional clock, consider this eye-catching design... Introducing Madera Wall Clock by Umbra This beautiful, modern clock has a wood veneer dial, aluminum bezel, and glass lens. Inspired by modern wristwatches Madera is intended to serve as a finishing touch for any space. Featuring a silent sweeping quartz mechanism, this wall clocks battery operated design...
In China, a striking clock was devised by the Buddhist monk and inventor Yi Xing (683–727).[5] The Chinese engineers Zhang Sixun and Su Song integrated striking clock mechanisms in astronomical clocks in the 10th and 11th centuries, respectively.[6] A striking clock outside of China was the water-powered clock tower near the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, Syria, which struck once every hour. It was constructed by the Arab engineer al-Kaysarani in 1154. In 1235, an early monumental water-powered alarm clock that "announced the appointed hours of prayer and the time both by day and by night" was completed in the entrance hall of the Mustansiriya Madrasah in Baghdad.[7]

"Very easy to use...Excellent Product...I cannot say enough about this clock -I love the fact mum is hearing my voice on a daily basis even though I live in another country....it's truly a great concept - great design and well worth it for elderly - for dementia patients or even for individuals who need a talking reminder about daily tasks or appts."
In mechanical clocks this is done mechanically by a gear train, known as the wheel train. The gear train also has a second function; to transmit mechanical power from the power source to run the oscillator. There is a friction coupling called the 'cannon pinion' between the gears driving the hands and the rest of the clock, allowing the hands to be turned to set the time.[73]
Some predecessors to the modern clock may be considered as "clocks" that are based on movement in nature: A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a flat surface. There is a range of duration timers, a well-known example being the hourglass. Water clocks, along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments. A major advance occurred with the invention of the verge escapement, which made possible the first mechanical clocks around 1300 in Europe, which kept time with oscillating timekeepers like balance wheels.[1][2][3][4]
In Chinese culture, giving a clock (送鍾/送钟, sòng zhōng) is often taboo, especially to the elderly as the term for this act is a homophone with the term for the act of attending another's funeral (送終/送终, sòngzhōng).[75][76][77] A UK government official Susan Kramer gave a watch to Taipei mayor Ko Wen-je unaware of such a taboo which resulted in some professional embarrassment and a pursuant apology.[78]
The oldest surviving clock in England is that at Salisbury Cathedral, which dates from 1386. A clock erected at Rouen, France, in 1389 is still extant, and one built for Wells Cathedral in England is preserved in the Science Museum in London. The Salisbury clock strikes the hours, and those of Rouen and Wells also have mechanisms for chiming at the quarter hour. These clocks are large, iron-framed structures driven by falling weights attached to a cord wrapped around a drum and regulated by a mechanism known as a verge (or crown wheel) escapement. Their errors probably were as large as a half hour per day. The first domestic clocks were smaller wall-mounted versions of these large public clocks. They appeared late in the 14th century, and few examples have survived; most of them, extremely austere in design, had no cases or means of protection from dust.

While some people have a type of internal clock and can wake up around the same time every day, most people need a little extra help in this department. Without an alarm clock, you could sleep through your plans for the day, whether those plans include fun activities with loved ones or getting things done around the house. You might think you can use the built-in alarm on your phone. However, it's too easy to grab your phone from your bedside table and turn off the alarm without really waking up and getting going for the day.


Go to bed with positive thoughts. Tell yourself, “I want to get up early because…” and then, actually do it. Sleep studies happen all the time, and they tell us what exterior activities are affecting our dreams, our nightmares, etc., and talking to yourself as you drift off to bed has been proven to work. If you’re looking forward to something in the morning, tell yourself about it, and your body will hold onto that through the night.
Get the reliability you need without sacrificing style. Get the reliability you need without sacrificing style. The Analog Quartz Mantel Alarm Clock from La Crosse Clock Co. is a traditional beeping alarm clock. It has the added bonus of luminous hands for easy nighttime viewing. The classic design features a black matted frame with black metal hands and ...  More + Product Details Close
"Stripe Clock" is a modern metallic design created by the artist, Belle. Measured at 24 inches on each side, this metal art is made from a single sheet of metal expertly grinded and tinted and made in to a functional clock. It is mainly characterized by the bright stripe in the middle of the sheet of metal. Each stroke and grind pattern on this piece accentuates the beauty of the plain sheet of metal. The glimmer coming from the shallow grinds are like street lights illuminating the city in the...

Versatile style abounds with this wood and metal wall clock, showcasing a wine barrel-inspired design. Its plank details pair perfectly with rustic decor while its rivet accents match with industrial options and factory-inspired furniture. Add it to the dining room to complement a cozy loft ensemble or use it to round out a bold boho look in the den. Its round silhouette adds traditional flair to both formal and casual aesthetics while its natural hues blend effortlessly into any color palette....
This metal wire case wall clock is finished in antique black with antique gold highlights. The pendulum bob, with matching finish, is an open circle, suspended on a metal pendulum. A black bezel surrounds the convex acrylic crystal. The dial features an antique Antique Red background with gold Arabic numerals and Antique gold spade hands. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement. One Year Warranty.
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The Howard Miller 625-542 Brass Works is an oversized, large wall clock featuring a metal outer frame finished in antique brass and accented by four decorative antique brass finished screws applied to the dial. The dial features antique brass-finished gears viewed through an open center. The gear in the middle of the clock turns as a second hand would rotate.. Quartz, battery-operated movement requires 1 AA battery. One year warranty and Free Shipping.

In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.

"Not bad...Love it...This alarm clock is perfect for anyone looking to charger your phone wireless and also has a USB to charger anything you want I have it to charger my gear S3 I also like that it's Bluetooth so I can play music and pick up phone call so I will Recommend this alarm clock to anyone looking to do the same thing I do with it I didn't talk about the alarm it's self because it like any other alarm set it up to Wake you up and it does its job...This is a nice alarm clock and also a decent Bluetooth radio however the reason I picked this up was for the wireless charger for the iPhone X. Regardless of the position the charger flashes on and off in a matter of seconds."


The Howard Miller Chaz 625-614 Contemporary Wall Clock is finished in a Satin Silver on select hardwoods and veneers. This clock features insert mirror panels accenting the fixed front frame. The white dial has polished chrome bar hour markers and hands. The rectangle cut-out reveals a polished chrome-finished pendulum bob. The Chaz features a accurate Quartz, battery-operated, single-chime movement that plays the Westminster chime on the hour and counts the hour. It also features Automatic nighttime chime shut-off. Requires four AA sized batteries (not included). One Year Warranty and Free Shipping.
A: If your clock is waking you up too abruptly, pulling you out of REM sleep like Leo from a dream inside another dream, your body goes into a moderate level of shock. You’ll feel your heart kick up all of a sudden, because now you’re awake, and your body has been taken by surprise. You have to go from a resting heart rate of 40-50 BPM, back to a standard heart rate (or a little higher at first) of around 60-100 BPM

Can we let you in on a secret? From pocket watches to grandfather clocks, a timepiece often tells as much about its owner as it does the hour. With a piece like this, you can ensure that it makes a statement in rustic-inspired style. Crafted from solid rubberwood with black metal spade handles, this piece is full of cottage charm. Featuring a distressed finish and roman numerals alongside its open back, this piece is sure to make welcome guests to your home with its modern farmhouse details.
This oversized aged metal wall clock is 31.5" square and is finished in aged white and gray. The aged dial with aged black Roman numerals and aged black spade hour and minute hands sits behind a glass crystal and is surrounded by a formed metal bezel finished in aged white and gray. Quartz, battery-operated movement requires one AA sized battery (not included). One year warranty and Free Shipping.
A. Many modern alarm clocks are designed to stimulate the natural wake and sleep cycle of the body. Clocks with sunlight simulation help give the body visual cues that it’s time to wake up. Clocks with progressive alarms provide gentle auditory cues. When the body has a chance to wake slowly, it can better prepare for the day, which may help you you feel more rested.
An alarm clock (alarm for short) is a clock that is designed to alert an individual or group of individuals at specified time. The primary function of these clocks is to awaken people from their night's sleep or short naps; they are sometimes used for other reminders as well. Most use sound; some use light or vibration. Some have sensors to identify when a person is in a light stage of sleep, in order to avoid waking someone who is deeply asleep, which causes tiredness, even if the person has had adequate sleep. To stop the sound or light, a button or handle on the clock is pressed; most clocks automatically stop the alarm if left unattended long enough. A classic analog alarm clock has an extra hand or inset dial that is used to specify the time at which to activate the alarm. Alarm clocks are also found on mobile phones, watches, and computers.
This oversized aged metal wall clock is 31.5" square and is finished in aged white and gray. The aged dial with aged black Roman numerals and aged black spade hour and minute hands sits behind a glass crystal and is surrounded by a formed metal bezel finished in aged white and gray. Quartz, battery-operated movement requires one AA sized battery (not included). One year warranty and Free Shipping.
Analog clocks usually use a clock face which indicates time using rotating pointers called "hands" on a fixed numbered dial or dials. The standard clock face, known universally throughout the world, has a short "hour hand" which indicates the hour on a circular dial of 12 hours, making two revolutions per day, and a longer "minute hand" which indicates the minutes in the current hour on the same dial, which is also divided into 60 minutes. It may also have a "second hand" which indicates the seconds in the current minute. The only other widely used clock face today is the 24 hour analog dial, because of the use of 24 hour time in military organizations and timetables. Before the modern clock face was standardized during the Industrial Revolution, many other face designs were used throughout the years, including dials divided into 6, 8, 10, and 24 hours. During the French Revolution the French government tried to introduce a 10-hour clock, as part of their decimal-based metric system of measurement, but it didn't catch on. An Italian 6 hour clock was developed in the 18th century, presumably to save power (a clock or watch striking 24 times uses more power).
In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.
late 14c., clokke, originally "clock with bells," probably from Middle Dutch clocke (Dutch klok) "a clock," from Old North French cloque (Old French cloke, Modern French cloche), from Medieval Latin (7c.) clocca "bell," probably from Celtic (cf. Old Irish clocc, Welsh cloch, Manx clagg "a bell") and spread by Irish missionaries (unless the Celtic words are from Latin); ultimately of imitative origin.

Bring bold, eye-popping appeal to your walls with this absolutely striking wall clock, the perfect finishing touch to your industrial-inspired ensemble. Crafted from welded steel and featuring a deep black finish, this understated and chic clock lends a touch of simple style to your look, while its 39" diameter ensures it will make a big impact wherever you decide to hang it. Hang it up over muted stripe wallpaper in the living room to let the patterns show through this clock's openwork design...

The Philips Wake-Up Light offers a choice of five pleasant nature sounds — or for the more traditionally minded, FM radio — for your morning wake-up call, but the real star of the show is the sunlight simulation. Twenty to forty minutes before your programmed wake-up time (you set both times), the clock will slowly begin to simulate the sunrise, complete with the softest dawn reds and oranges gently brightening into sunny, yellow light.
In a pendulum clock an escape wheel is allowed to rotate through the pitch of one tooth for each double swing of the pendulum and to transmit an impulse to the pendulum to keep it swinging. An ideal escapement would transmit the impulse without interfering with the free swing, and the impulse should be as uniform as possible. The double three-legged gravity escapement, which achieves the second of these but not the first, was invented by Edmund Beckett, afterward Lord Grimthorpe, and used by him for the great clock at Westminster, now generally known as Big Ben, which was installed in 1859. It became the standard for all really accurate tower clocks.

Remember a time before everything was digital? Yeah… we don’t either. But a few excellent time-tested products pop up out of the woodwork from time to time, and a traditional dual bell alarm clock does the trick. The hands move silently while you sleep, and buzz like a mother when it’s time to rise and shine. If you’re like us, you’re sometimes bothered by LED flashing you in the face all night. With Peakeep Twin Bell Stereoscopic Clock, you simply touch the button to activate the stereoscopic dial backlight, check the time, and they cop-out for another fifteen minutes. Don’t worry – Peakeep will wake you up.

This Digital Bluetooth AM/FM Dual Alarm Radio Tabletop Clock from Jensen makes getting up in the morning a more appealing proposition. With the option to wake to radio or alarm, you can start your day off right. It even has an aux input so you can connect a smartphone or music player, letting you play whatever tunes you like right from your nightstand.
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