An alarm clock (alarm for short) is a clock that is designed to alert an individual or group of individuals at specified time. The primary function of these clocks is to awaken people from their night's sleep or short naps; they are sometimes used for other reminders as well. Most use sound; some use light or vibration. Some have sensors to identify when a person is in a light stage of sleep, in order to avoid waking someone who is deeply asleep, which causes tiredness, even if the person has had adequate sleep. To stop the sound or light, a button or handle on the clock is pressed; most clocks automatically stop the alarm if left unattended long enough. A classic analog alarm clock has an extra hand or inset dial that is used to specify the time at which to activate the alarm. Alarm clocks are also found on mobile phones, watches, and computers.
This SmartSet Alarm Radio with Bluetooth Speaker Desktop Clock is a thing of the past. The digital tuning clock radio automatically sets itself on the first use to the correct year, month, date, day, and time. The clock radio features Bluetooth v4.1 digital tuning FM radio. Includes a USB output for mobile charging (2.1a 5V) and a large and easy-to-read LED display. The alarm can be programmed to operate on weekdays only, weekends only, or all seven days of the week. Set the alarm to wake you...
Sounds like a Marvel villain if you say it out loud, doesn’t it? Sonic Alert Vibrating Skull Crusher Clock has a bit of edge to it, and like your metal days, it’s going to wake you up with a thunderous roar. You get 113 decibels of noise, which is basically like a crappy $20.00 blender whizzing right next to your head. Hook up your phone or MP3 player to rock out to your tunes in the morning, should you dare. You get a five-dimmer setting for the red LED display, and the 12-volt bone crusher bed shaker, just to make sure you’re really awake in the morning.
Certainly not just for telling time, this oversized wall clock makes a statement whether set in the entryway or above your living room mantel. Its frame is crafted from metal with an antiqued silver leaf design for metallic allure. The openwork design allows it to seamlessly blend with your ensemble, while a fun analog dial lends a pop of playful appeal. Requires one AA battery to operate.
If you have a serious problem sleeping through your alarm, this retro little clock is for you. Because it doesn’t have a snooze button, you’ll be forced to either shut the alarm off completely and risk oversleeping, or you’ll learn to rise with the alarm. Also good: it’s doesn’t have an annoying ticking sound like other vintage clocks, so you won’t be kept awake at night.
Rise and shine, rebel. This Stormtrooper comes to you, bringing news of a peace proposal with the empire. See those bright numbers displayed brilliantly on its LCD screen? That means it's time to go. Adjustable arms point toward the door, beckoning for you to make haste. But before you head off to save the galaxy, you might want to turn your Lego alarm clock off first. Plus, if you're a Darth Vader fan, you can get this alarm clock with him, too!
Now this is an alarm clock for the heaviest sleeper. If you're the type who sleeps through anything — thunderstorms, loud neighbors, earthquakes, the zombie apocalypse — you've finally met your match. Sonic Alert's Sonic Bomb Alarm Clock doesn't just rely on its 113-decibel alarm to pry your eyelids open (for comparison, that's about the same decibel level as a car horn or snow blower going off in your ear), it also has a shaker device that slips underneath your mattress or pillow to jiggle you awake, and red flashing lights that trigger with the alarm.
While some people have a type of internal clock and can wake up around the same time every day, most people need a little extra help in this department. Without an alarm clock, you could sleep through your plans for the day, whether those plans include fun activities with loved ones or getting things done around the house. You might think you can use the built-in alarm on your phone. However, it's too easy to grab your phone from your bedside table and turn off the alarm without really waking up and getting going for the day.

The glossy finish reflects just enough light to show off the clock’s clean lines and rounded edges, and individuals who prefer a little bit of background ambiance throughout the night will enjoy the gentle ticking. The clock is also ultra-compact, so it won’t crowd your nightstand. The off button located on the top quickly silences the old-school beeping, too, but unfortunately, the device lacks a snooze button.
The timekeeping element of a quartz clock consists of a ring of quartz about 2.5 inches (63.5 mm) in diameter, suspended by threads and enclosed in a heat-insulated chamber. Electrodes are attached to the surfaces of the ring and connected to an electrical circuit in such a manner as to sustain oscillations. Since the frequency of vibration, 100,000-hertz, is too high for convenient time measurement, it is reduced by a process known as frequency division or demultiplication and applied to a synchronous motor connected to a clock dial through mechanical gearing. If a 100,000 hertz frequency, for example, is subjected to a combined electrical and mechanical gearing reduction of 6,000,000 to 1, then the second hand of the synchronous clock will make exactly one rotation in 60 seconds. The vibrations are so regular that the maximum error of an observatory quartz-crystal clock is only a few ten-thousandths of a second per day, equivalent to an error of one second every 10 years.
This is the number-one selling kid's clock on Amazon, with more than 2,500 reviews. Parents rave about the restoration of their sleep time. Many parents say it "saved me from my early riser! Life changing!" Even parents of older children with developmental delays found the clock very useful in indicating to non-readers when it's okay to get up, and when it's not.
This Alarm Clock has many features that make it an excellent addition to your nightstand, work station, kitchen counter or end table. The first thing that separates this Alarm Clock from the rest are the two, easily accessible USB ports located directly on the front of the clock. These ports are fast charging and are perfect for your phone or tablet. Second, the illuminated digits are bright and easy to read in the dark. If you find them too bright when you are trying to fall asleep there is a...
Don't worry, Zeus didn't show up to your home, but you'll certainly feel that way when waking up to this unit's thunderous, 113-decibel buzzing. Fair warning: It's definitely loud, so it's a good pick only if you're a heavy, heavy sleeper. Just in case the noise somehow isn't enough to pry you out of bed, this alarm clock flashes multiple bright red LEDs and comes with a bed shaker that'll really get you going. Trust us, if that sensory overload doesn't get the job done, nothing will.
If you're looking for just that stylish accessory that will turn your home into a stylish place then you are right with this watch. Easy to install, no tools like a drill or screws needed. Once it's up on the wall you will not want to take it down ever again because it enchants every room it is in. Simplicity in design offers quick and easy installation The perfect office clock, classroom clock, or wall clock Large numbers guarantee good view, even from side In addition to telling you the current time, this clock also serves as a beautiful accent piece in the home. Size: 13" Diameter

In Europe, between 1280 and 1320, there is an increase in the number of references to clocks and horologes in church records, and this probably indicates that a new type of clock mechanism had been devised. Existing clock mechanisms that used water power were being adapted to take their driving power from falling weights. This power was controlled by some form of oscillating mechanism, probably derived from existing bell-ringing or alarm devices. This controlled release of power—the escapement—marks the beginning of the true mechanical clock, which differed from the previously mentioned cogwheel clocks. Verge escapement mechanism derived in the surge of true mechanical clocks, which didn't need any kind of fluid power, like water or mercury, to work.
A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The position of a ship at sea could be determined with reasonable accuracy if a navigator could refer to a clock that lost or gained less than about 10 seconds per day. This clock could not contain a pendulum, which would be virtually useless on a rocking ship. In 1714, the British government offered large financial rewards to the value of 20,000 pounds,[42] for anyone who could determine longitude accurately. John Harrison, who dedicated his life to improving the accuracy of his clocks, later received considerable sums under the Longitude Act.
In 1815, Francis Ronalds published the first electric clock powered by dry pile batteries.[48] Alexander Bain, Scottish clockmaker, patented the electric clock in 1840. The electric clock's mainspring is wound either with an electric motor or with an electromagnet and armature. In 1841, he first patented the electromagnetic pendulum. By the end of the nineteenth century, the advent of the dry cell battery made it feasible to use electric power in clocks. Spring or weight driven clocks that use electricity, either alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC), to rewind the spring or raise the weight of a mechanical clock would be classified as an electromechanical clock. This classification would also apply to clocks that employ an electrical impulse to propel the pendulum. In electromechanical clocks the electricity serves no time keeping function. These types of clocks were made as individual timepieces but more commonly used in synchronized time installations in schools, businesses, factories, railroads and government facilities as a master clock and slave clocks.

It is undesirable to give someone a clock or (depending on the region) other timepiece as a gift. Traditional superstitions regard this as counting the seconds to the recipient's death. Another common interpretation of this is that the phrase "to give a clock" (simplified Chinese: 送钟; traditional Chinese: 送鐘) in Chinese is pronounced "sòng zhōng" in Mandarin, which is a homophone of a phrase for "terminating" or "attending a funeral" (both can be written as 送終 (traditional) or 送终 (simplified)). Cantonese people consider such a gift as a curse.[79]
As stylish as it is functional, this lovely clock lends a touch of charm and classic appeal to your tabletop display. A traditional design, it showcases a rounded frame with a pedestal base and a solid black finish. The neutral-toned clock face is accented with black Roman numeral numbering and three thin black hands. Crafted from plastic, it is a budget-friendly choice. It also features a beeping alarm for added convenience.
Early clock dials did not indicate minutes and seconds. A clock with a dial indicating minutes was illustrated in a 1475 manuscript by Paulus Almanus,[31] and some 15th-century clocks in Germany indicated minutes and seconds.[32] An early record of a seconds hand on a clock dates back to about 1560 on a clock now in the Fremersdorf collection.[33]:417–418[34]
A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The position of a ship at sea could be determined with reasonable accuracy if a navigator could refer to a clock that lost or gained less than about 10 seconds per day. This clock could not contain a pendulum, which would be virtually useless on a rocking ship. In 1714, the British government offered large financial rewards to the value of 20,000 pounds,[42] for anyone who could determine longitude accurately. John Harrison, who dedicated his life to improving the accuracy of his clocks, later received considerable sums under the Longitude Act.

Wall clocks are available in a wide array of colors to fit any decor style. Classic black and white, silver or antique metal, and natural, brown, or dark wood choices have timeless appeal. Fun colors like red or turquoise are also available. Most clocks feature a high-contrast face with a white background and black numbers or roman numerals to make seeing the time easier.


Time switches can be used to turn on anything that will awaken a sleeper, and can therefore be used as alarms. Lights, bells, and radio and TV sets can easily be used.[32] More elaborate devices have also been used, such as machines that automatically prepare tea or coffee. A sound is produced when the drink is ready, so the sleeper awakes to find the freshly brewed drink waiting.[33]

About 1450, clockmakers working probably in southern Germany or northern Italy began to make small clocks driven by a spring. These were the first portable timepieces, representing an important landmark in horology. The time-telling dials of these clocks usually had an hour hand only (minute hands did not generally appear until the 1650s) and were exposed to the air; there was normally no form of cover such as a glass until the 17th century, though the mechanism was enclosed, and the cases were made of brass.
The invention of the mechanical clock in the 13th century initiated a change in timekeeping methods from continuous processes, such as the motion of the gnomon's shadow on a sundial or the flow of liquid in a water clock, to periodic oscillatory processes, such as the swing of a pendulum or the vibration of a quartz crystal,[3][63] which had the potential for more accuracy. All modern clocks use oscillation.

In Europe, between 1280 and 1320, there is an increase in the number of references to clocks and horologes in church records, and this probably indicates that a new type of clock mechanism had been devised. Existing clock mechanisms that used water power were being adapted to take their driving power from falling weights. This power was controlled by some form of oscillating mechanism, probably derived from existing bell-ringing or alarm devices. This controlled release of power—the escapement—marks the beginning of the true mechanical clock, which differed from the previously mentioned cogwheel clocks. Verge escapement mechanism derived in the surge of true mechanical clocks, which didn't need any kind of fluid power, like water or mercury, to work.


Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]

If it has the iHome name attached to it, you know it’s going to be flashy. Their Bluetooth color changing clock hits home on all the necessary marks, allowing you to talk and end phone conversations with the touch of a button, as well as the five multiple LED color settings. It isn’t all about waking up in the morning; this alarm clock has you ready to go with a fully charged iPhone, fed sweet, sweet energy while you sleep. The last alarm clock you’ll ever need is staring you right in the face – it’s time to complete your iHome collection in style.

Over the past decade, many of us have gotten used to setting our alarm clocks on our smartphones rather than purchasing a dedicated device for our nightstands. Despite their seeming obsolescence, an array of cutting-edge clocks have hit the market to aid us with everything from falling asleep to promoting better sleep cycles. Even Amazon is in the alarm clock game, with the Echo Spot, a device that resembles a Magic 8 Ball and functions much like the Echo Show.


You also need an alarm clock when you have a job or you're in school. It's important for you to wake up on time and avoid being tardy. Arriving late to work is an offense that could get you fired from your job, especially if happens more than once. Missing class because you slept in will also slow your educational progress and waste your money. When you put your alarm clock on your dresser instead of putting it right by your bed, you'll have to get up to turn it off, which helps you get going for the day.


Analog clocks usually use a clock face which indicates time using rotating pointers called "hands" on a fixed numbered dial or dials. The standard clock face, known universally throughout the world, has a short "hour hand" which indicates the hour on a circular dial of 12 hours, making two revolutions per day, and a longer "minute hand" which indicates the minutes in the current hour on the same dial, which is also divided into 60 minutes. It may also have a "second hand" which indicates the seconds in the current minute. The only other widely used clock face today is the 24 hour analog dial, because of the use of 24 hour time in military organizations and timetables. Before the modern clock face was standardized during the Industrial Revolution, many other face designs were used throughout the years, including dials divided into 6, 8, 10, and 24 hours. During the French Revolution the French government tried to introduce a 10-hour clock, as part of their decimal-based metric system of measurement, but it didn't catch on. An Italian 6 hour clock was developed in the 18th century, presumably to save power (a clock or watch striking 24 times uses more power).
Don't worry, Zeus didn't show up to your home, but you'll certainly feel that way when waking up to this unit's thunderous, 113-decibel buzzing. Fair warning: It's definitely loud, so it's a good pick only if you're a heavy, heavy sleeper. Just in case the noise somehow isn't enough to pry you out of bed, this alarm clock flashes multiple bright red LEDs and comes with a bed shaker that'll really get you going. Trust us, if that sensory overload doesn't get the job done, nothing will.
"Love it...Love it....Just a basic alarm clock needed one to check that my FM transmitter is on the correct frequency one that had a digital tuner fits the bill just fine and a battery back up clock for time announcements ....What can I say, it's a quality alarm, that never fails, and is not expensive Not once has this alarm failed to wake me up, Digits are bright and easy to see If I were to say something negative, The time is a little too fast (in a month you'll notice your like a minute or two ahead of the actual time, easy fix though) And the radio connection needs to better"
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