This massive iron wall clock is 49" in diameter and is finished in off-white with an antique nickel outer ring that is moderately distressed and dented for an aged appearance. Black Roman numerals are centered on individual antique off-white panels. Quartz, battery-operated movement requires one AA sized battery. Some assembly is required. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
By the time that phone hits the nightstand, you've lost precious sleep time, you've tricked your brain into thinking it's wake-up time instead of dream time, because the glow of the blue light emitted by your phone reduces your body's release of melatonin, the hormone that regulates your sleep cycle. Instead of relaxing, you've stimulated your mind. All of that adds up to poor quality sleep followed by a groggy, foggy, "I don't know why I'm so tired," kind of morning.

Bolter, David J. Turing's Man: Western Culture in the Computer Age. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, N.C. (1984). ISBN 0-8078-4108-0 pbk. Very good, readable summary of the role of "the clock" in its setting the direction of philosophic movement for the "Western World". Cf. picture on p. 25 showing the verge and foliot. Bolton derived the picture from Macey, p. 20.
Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century,[25][26][27] although they are often erroneously credited to Nuremberg watchmaker Peter Henlein (or Henle, or Hele) around 1511.[28][29][30] The earliest existing spring driven clock is the chamber clock given to Phillip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, around 1430, now in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum.[4] Spring power presented clockmakers with a new problem: how to keep the clock movement running at a constant rate as the spring ran down. This resulted in the invention of the stackfreed and the fusee in the 15th century, and many other innovations, down to the invention of the modern going barrel in 1760.
The oldest surviving clock in England is that at Salisbury Cathedral, which dates from 1386. A clock erected at Rouen, France, in 1389 is still extant, and one built for Wells Cathedral in England is preserved in the Science Museum in London. The Salisbury clock strikes the hours, and those of Rouen and Wells also have mechanisms for chiming at the quarter hour. These clocks are large, iron-framed structures driven by falling weights attached to a cord wrapped around a drum and regulated by a mechanism known as a verge (or crown wheel) escapement. Their errors probably were as large as a half hour per day. The first domestic clocks were smaller wall-mounted versions of these large public clocks. They appeared late in the 14th century, and few examples have survived; most of them, extremely austere in design, had no cases or means of protection from dust.
If the four alarms you scheduled to go off 10 minutes apart wake your neighbors but not you, you might want to try this noisy clock; it has a 113-decibel alarm—about as loud as a jackhammer. And if the volume alone won't do it, the red flashing lights and accompanying bed-shaker unit (which goes beneath your mattress) should deliver the full sensory message that grave danger awaits unless you get out of bed.

Revamp the interiors of your living room with the Howard Miller Cooper Table Alarm Clock. Built for functionality and practicality, the table clock is elegant and stylishly designed to add an edge to your home. With contemporary and modern accents, the alarm clock will awaken you with its impeccable design and beauty. Crafted out of glass and metal, the table alarm clock is the perfect combination of efficiency and glamour. The top and base materials are made out of a firm aluminum frame...
This curvaceous wall clock features carved accents and a turned urn finial which complement the unique style. The aged dial offers black Roman numerals and decorative black hands. A special 80th Anniversary Edition. The wooden stick swinging pendulum features an antique-brass spun bob. Finished in Tuscany Cherry on select hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, dual chime movement plays switchable quarter hour 4/4 Westminster or Ave Maria chimes. Volume control and automatic nighttime chime shut-off option.
The invention of the mechanical clock in the 13th century initiated a change in timekeeping methods from continuous processes, such as the motion of the gnomon's shadow on a sundial or the flow of liquid in a water clock, to periodic oscillatory processes, such as the swing of a pendulum or the vibration of a quartz crystal,[3][63] which had the potential for more accuracy. All modern clocks use oscillation.
Islamic civilization is credited with further advancing the accuracy of clocks with elaborate engineering. In 797 (or possibly 801), the Abbasid caliph of Baghdad, Harun al-Rashid, presented Charlemagne with an Asian Elephant named Abul-Abbas together with a "particularly elaborate example" of a water[12] clock. Pope Sylvester II introduced clocks to northern and western Europe around 1000AD[13]
Time switches can be used to turn on anything that will awaken a sleeper, and can therefore be used as alarms. Lights, bells, and radio and TV sets can easily be used.[32] More elaborate devices have also been used, such as machines that automatically prepare tea or coffee. A sound is produced when the drink is ready, so the sleeper awakes to find the freshly brewed drink waiting.[33]

The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]

Wall clocks offer a decorative alternative to traditional wall art while also serving a practical function. Whether you want an oversized wall clock to mount above the fireplace and serve as a focal point in your living room or a small model to hang in your kitchen to help keep your family on schedule on school days, Overstock carries the perfect model for your needs. Trusted brands, including Westclox, La Crosse, and Hans Andersen Home, ensure accuracy and durability. From retro-inspired metal clocks in colorful finishes to classic wooden case clocks featuring lustrous stains, Overstock carries wall clocks in an array of styles, sizes, and types with a wide range of features. Read on to learn more about the inventory of wall clocks at Overstock.
The Howard Miller Arendal II 625-551 Wall Clock is a long version of the ever popular Arendal Quartz Wall Clock. This tall, elongated 49" high wall clock features carved accents and a turned urn finial which complement the unique style. The aged dial offers black Roman numerals and decorative black hands. The long, wooden stick pendulum features an antique-brass spun bob which swings back and forth and is battery operated like all quartz clocks. The wooden stick swinging pendulum features an antique-brass spun bob. Quartz, triple-chime Harmonic movement plays choice of full Westminster or Ave Maria chimes with strike on the hour with 1/4, 1/2, 3/4 chimes accordingly or switch to hourly only. Bim Bam chime on the hour only. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
About 1581 Galileo noticed the characteristic timekeeping property of the pendulum. The Dutch astronomer and physicist Christiaan Huygens was responsible for the practical application of the pendulum as a time controller in clocks from 1656 onward. Huygens’s invention brought about a great increase in the importance and extent of clock making. Clocks, weight-driven and with short pendulums, were encased in wood and made to hang on the wall, but these new eight-day wall clocks had very heavy weights, and many fell off weak plaster walls and were destroyed. The next step was to extend the case to the floor, and the grandfather clock was born. In 1670 the long, or seconds, pendulum was introduced by English clock makers with the anchor escapement.
Strong, durable, super large time display makes the model perfect for those who either want a big number clock, or for visually impaired individuals who need extra-large numerals, The red LED display on a black background, makes the contrast ideal for easy viewing. The electric power with battery backup lets you sleep with peace of mind and the extra-large snooze bar keeps nap-time within reach. This clock is a solid purchase.
“The alarm is loud with a lower frequency melody which I like since I have high-frequency hearing loss. Guaranteed to wake anyone up when the alarm goes off which is super important to me, especially if I’m using the alarm clock to wake up to catch a flight. … When the alarm goes off, press the large snooze bar on the top to have the alarm go off again in five minutes. Pressing the snooze bar on top at anytime also lights up the numbers and bars on the clock’s face, but the hands are a bit hard to see in the dark since the hands don’t light up. When the alarm on/off switch is turned to the off position, there’s a cute voice that says ‘Good Morning!’ which brings a smile to start the day. We love this clock so much, we plan to buy more to give as gifts. We’re sure the recipients will love it as much as we do.”
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