Taking cues from vintage timepieces, this classic round alarm clock ticks boxes for both fashion and function. Measuring just 7.7'' H x 5'' W x 2.3'' D overall, this petite piece is perfectly proportioned to sit on a nightstand, and it makes a subtle ticking sound to provide white noise as you snooze. A metallic finish on the frame offers a bit of sleek style, while twin bells up above help wake you up and keep you on time.

“This alarm clock will wake you up! I’m totally deaf in one ear and partially deaf in the other. Alarm clocks I used before I purchased this one might as well have been turned off if I happened to have my good ear on the pillow when they went off. This one is loud! Now having said that, its loudness is adjustable, and I found that a low setting of two works just fine for me, but if I am particularly concerned about being awakened, I also set the vibrating disk, which is slipped under the mattress. Believe me: Even if you are totally deaf in both ears, this will wake you up. I was skeptical about the vibrator because I have a thick mattress, but it works with no problem at all! I wholeheartedly recommend this alarm clock for anyone who is hearing impaired.”
If it has the iHome name attached to it, you know it’s going to be flashy. Their Bluetooth color changing clock hits home on all the necessary marks, allowing you to talk and end phone conversations with the touch of a button, as well as the five multiple LED color settings. It isn’t all about waking up in the morning; this alarm clock has you ready to go with a fully charged iPhone, fed sweet, sweet energy while you sleep. The last alarm clock you’ll ever need is staring you right in the face – it’s time to complete your iHome collection in style.
You don't have to use all of those features, however. You can set them in a variety of combinations, or even turn all of them off except for the flashing red lights. You can also set the length of the alarm's ring from one to 60 minutes, and choose a snooze option from one to 30 minutes. Plus, the clock has dual alarms, so both you and your partner can have different wake-up times.
Revamp the interiors of your living room with the Howard Miller Cooper Table Alarm Clock. Built for functionality and practicality, the table clock is elegant and stylishly designed to add an edge to your home. With contemporary and modern accents, the alarm clock will awaken you with its impeccable design and beauty. Crafted out of glass and metal, the table alarm clock is the perfect combination of efficiency and glamour. The top and base materials are made out of a firm aluminum frame...
Though no longer our first pick of timepiece thanks to the smart phone, this old-fashioned clock still scores points for form. Measuring 6.25'' H x 2.5'' W x 5'' D, this compact clock’s face is encased in a metal case with a brushed nickel finish and convex glass lens, while its faded dial stays in step with vintage styling. This item is battery operated, but does not emit a loud ticking noise, so you can snooze to your heart's content.
You can set the clock to release aromatherapeutic scents in tandem with the light, choosing from four different fragrances that come with the clock or using your own essential oil blend. Fifteen minutes before your wake-up time, it'll also emit your choice of soft nature noises. The cycle ends with a chiming noise that gradually grows in volume to ensure that even the heaviest sleepers will wake up.

Remember a time before everything was digital? Yeah… we don’t either. But a few excellent time-tested products pop up out of the woodwork from time to time, and a traditional dual bell alarm clock does the trick. The hands move silently while you sleep, and buzz like a mother when it’s time to rise and shine. If you’re like us, you’re sometimes bothered by LED flashing you in the face all night. With Peakeep Twin Bell Stereoscopic Clock, you simply touch the button to activate the stereoscopic dial backlight, check the time, and they cop-out for another fifteen minutes. Don’t worry – Peakeep will wake you up.

Categories: English 1-syllable wordsEnglish terms with IPA pronunciationEnglish terms with audio linksEnglish terms inherited from Middle EnglishEnglish terms derived from Middle EnglishEnglish terms derived from Middle DutchEnglish terms derived from Old Northern FrenchEnglish terms derived from Medieval LatinEnglish terms derived from Proto-CelticEnglish terms derived from Proto-Indo-EuropeanEnglish lemmasEnglish nounsEnglish countable nounsBritish EnglishEnglish terms with usage examplesen:Electronicsen:ComputingEnglish informal termsEnglish verbsEnglish transitive verbsEnglish slangNew Zealand EnglishRequests for quotation/Jonathan SwiftEnglish intransitive verbsEnglish dated termsWebster 1913English basic wordsen:Beetlesen:Cichorieae tribe plantsen:Clocksen:TimekeepingScots lemmasScots verbs
This Digital Bluetooth AM/FM Dual Alarm Radio Tabletop Clock from Jensen makes getting up in the morning a more appealing proposition. With the option to wake to radio or alarm, you can start your day off right. It even has an aux input so you can connect a smartphone or music player, letting you play whatever tunes you like right from your nightstand.
This metal wire case wall clock is finished in antique black with antique gold highlights. The pendulum bob, with matching finish, is an open circle, suspended on a metal pendulum. A black bezel surrounds the convex acrylic crystal. The dial features an antique Antique Red background with gold Arabic numerals and Antique gold spade hands. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement. One Year Warranty.
The most accurate mechanical timekeeper is the Shortt pendulum clock; it makes use of the movement described above for electric master clock systems. The Shortt pendulum clock consists of two separate clocks, one of which synchronizes the other. The timekeeping element is a pendulum that swings freely, except that once every half minute it receives an impulse from a gently falling lever. This lever is released by an electrical signal transmitted from its slave clock. After the impulse has been sent, a synchronizing signal is transmitted back to the slave clock that ensures that the impulse to the free pendulum will be released exactly a half minute later than the previous impulse. The pendulum swings in a sealed box in which the air is kept at a constant, low pressure. Shortt clocks in observatories are kept in a room, usually a basement, where the temperature remains nearly constant, and under these conditions they can maintain the correct time to within a few thousandths of a second per day.

The Howard Miller Chaz 625-614 Contemporary Wall Clock is finished in a Satin Silver on select hardwoods and veneers. This clock features insert mirror panels accenting the fixed front frame. The white dial has polished chrome bar hour markers and hands. The rectangle cut-out reveals a polished chrome-finished pendulum bob. The Chaz features a accurate Quartz, battery-operated, single-chime movement that plays the Westminster chime on the hour and counts the hour. It also features Automatic nighttime chime shut-off. Requires four AA sized batteries (not included). One Year Warranty and Free Shipping. 

It’s vital to your personal health. When you rest at night, after about twenty to thirty minutes, your body begins to enter REM sleep (if you’re lucky). Either way, your body slows down. Your heart rate hits around 40-50 BPM when you’re sleeping, compared to the 60-100 BPM you go through while you’re awake. This gives your body time to give your heart a rest, repair blood vessels, and repair muscle tissue if you worked out, or physically strained yourself during the day.
The Howard Miller Brohman 625-618 Large Wall Clock has a brushed, warm brown finish and metallic undertones. At 34" in diameter with a 22" aged dial this clock will fit just about any decor. With large Roman numerals and black hands this clock will be a favorite for years to come. Highly accurate quartz movement requires one AA battery (Not Included).
This special 82nd Anniversary Edition Contemporary wall clock is one our more popular pendulum chiming wall clocks and features a white dial with black Roman numerals and a brushed nickel bezel. A spun nickel pendulum bob is suspended in front of a mirrored back. Finished in Black Satin. One Year Warranty. Quartz, triple chime Harmonic movement plays your choice of Westminster, Ave Maria, or Bim-Bam chimes with volume control and automatic nighttime chime shut-off option.
Bring bold, eye-popping appeal to your walls with this absolutely striking wall clock, the perfect finishing touch to your industrial-inspired ensemble. Crafted from welded steel and featuring a deep black finish, this understated and chic clock lends a touch of simple style to your look, while its 39" diameter ensures it will make a big impact wherever you decide to hang it. Hang it up over muted stripe wallpaper in the living room to let the patterns show through this clock's openwork design...
In 1735, Harrison built his first chronometer, which he steadily improved on over the next thirty years before submitting it for examination. The clock had many innovations, including the use of bearings to reduce friction, weighted balances to compensate for the ship's pitch and roll in the sea and the use of two different metals to reduce the problem of expansion from heat. The chronometer was tested in 1761 by Harrison's son and by the end of 10 weeks the clock was in error by less than 5 seconds.[43]

Fellow tea-lovers, all of our dreams are coming true! We can finally wake up to the smells and sounds of freshly brewed tea with the Teasmade Alarm Clock. Instead of making screeching noises to get you out of bed, it'll first brew you a fresh cup of tea at the time of your choice, and then sound an alarm after boiling is complete. After dark, the face of the clock illuminates with an adjustable blue night light that's dim enough to not disturb light-sensitive sleepers.


Clockmakers developed their art in various ways. Building smaller clocks was a technical challenge, as was improving accuracy and reliability. Clocks could be impressive showpieces to demonstrate skilled craftsmanship, or less expensive, mass-produced items for domestic use. The escapement in particular was an important factor affecting the clock's accuracy, so many different mechanisms were tried.
For some scientific work timing of the utmost accuracy is essential. It is also necessary to have a standard of the maximum accuracy against which working clocks can be calibrated. An ideal clock would give the time to unlimited accuracy, but this is not realisable. Many physical processes, in particular including some transitions between atomic energy levels, occur at exceedingly stable frequency; counting cycles of such a process can give a very accurate and consistent time—clocks which work this way are usually called atomic clocks. Such clocks are typically large, very expensive, require a controlled environment, and are far more accurate than required for most purposes; they are typically used in a standards laboratory.
An alarm clock (alarm for short) is a clock that is designed to alert an individual or group of individuals at specified time. The primary function of these clocks is to awaken people from their night's sleep or short naps; they are sometimes used for other reminders as well. Most use sound; some use light or vibration. Some have sensors to identify when a person is in a light stage of sleep, in order to avoid waking someone who is deeply asleep, which causes tiredness, even if the person has had adequate sleep. To stop the sound or light, a button or handle on the clock is pressed; most clocks automatically stop the alarm if left unattended long enough. A classic analog alarm clock has an extra hand or inset dial that is used to specify the time at which to activate the alarm. Alarm clocks are also found on mobile phones, watches, and computers.
Fortunately, Ruggie takes the ease and convenience out of simply rolling over and slapping “snooze.” With Ruggie, you must apply pressure to a plush mat for three seconds to stop the alarm. The alarm can be set to 120 decibels, too, to further annoy you out of bed. For sake of perspective, 120 decibels is on par with the noise level of a chainsaw. Pleasant.
Now you can wake up to the sun without even opening your curtains. This alarm clock uses a gentle glow that simulates a sunrise, waking you gently and naturally, so you definitely won't want to murder it when it starts going off. Choose from five different calming sounds to pair with the gradual light for an all-around sensory experience, or just select the FM radio option (that you'll inevitably snooze once or twice).

Categories: English 1-syllable wordsEnglish terms with IPA pronunciationEnglish terms with audio linksEnglish terms inherited from Middle EnglishEnglish terms derived from Middle EnglishEnglish terms derived from Middle DutchEnglish terms derived from Old Northern FrenchEnglish terms derived from Medieval LatinEnglish terms derived from Proto-CelticEnglish terms derived from Proto-Indo-EuropeanEnglish lemmasEnglish nounsEnglish countable nounsBritish EnglishEnglish terms with usage examplesen:Electronicsen:ComputingEnglish informal termsEnglish verbsEnglish transitive verbsEnglish slangNew Zealand EnglishRequests for quotation/Jonathan SwiftEnglish intransitive verbsEnglish dated termsWebster 1913English basic wordsen:Beetlesen:Cichorieae tribe plantsen:Clocksen:TimekeepingScots lemmasScots verbs
Besides the Chinese astronomical clock of Su Song in 1088 mentioned above, in Europe there were the clocks constructed by Richard of Wallingford in St Albans by 1336, and by Giovanni de Dondi in Padua from 1348 to 1364. They no longer exist, but detailed descriptions of their design and construction survive,[22][23] and modern reproductions have been made.[23] They illustrate how quickly the theory of the mechanical clock had been translated into practical constructions, and also that one of the many impulses to their development had been the desire of astronomers to investigate celestial phenomena.

The tick duration must be positive. If it has a part smaller than a whole millisecond, then the whole duration must divide into one second without leaving a remainder. All normal tick durations will match these criteria, including any multiple of hours, minutes, seconds and milliseconds, and sensible nanosecond durations, such as 20ns, 250,000ns and 500,000ns.

Any expansion or contraction of the rod caused by changes of temperature will affect the timekeeping of a pendulum; e.g., a pendulum clock with a steel rod will lose one second a day for a rise in temperature of approximately 4 °F (2.2 °C). For accurate timekeeping, the length of the pendulum must be kept as nearly constant as possible. This may be done in several ways, some of which use the differing coefficients of expansion (the amount of expansion per degree change in temperature) of different metals to obtain a cancelling-out effect. In one popular compensation method, the bob consists of a glass or metal jar containing a suitable amount of mercury. The gridiron pendulum employs rods of different metal, usually brass and steel, while in the zinc-iron tube the pendulum rod is made of concentric tubes of zinc and iron. An improved method, however, is to make the pendulum rod from a special alloy called Invar. This material has such a small coefficient of expansion that small changes of temperature have a negligible effect and can easily be compensated for if required.
Rise and shine, rebel. This Stormtrooper comes to you, bringing news of a peace proposal with the empire. See those bright numbers displayed brilliantly on its LCD screen? That means it's time to go. Adjustable arms point toward the door, beckoning for you to make haste. But before you head off to save the galaxy, you might want to turn your Lego alarm clock off first. Plus, if you're a Darth Vader fan, you can get this alarm clock with him, too!
Scientific studies on sleep having shown that sleep stage at awakening is an important factor in amplifying sleep inertia. Alarm clocks involving sleep stage monitoring appeared on the market in 2005.[22] The alarm clocks use sensing technologies such as EEG electrodes and accelerometers to wake people from sleep.[23][24]Dawn simulators are another technology meant to mediate these effects.[25]

The primary purpose of a clock is to display the time. Clocks may also have the facility to make a loud alert signal at a specified time, typically to waken a sleeper at a preset time; they are referred to as alarm clocks. The alarm may start at a low volume and become louder, or have the facility to be switched off for a few minutes then resume. Alarm clocks with visible indicators are sometimes used to indicate to children too young to read the time that the time for sleep has finished; they are sometimes called training clocks.

Health chose the Sonic Bomb as one of the best alarm clocks for heavy sleepers, commenting that the flashing lights, loud sound, and bed shaker should "deliver the full sensory message that grave danger awaits unless you get out of bed." Reviews.com likes it as well, although they aren't crazy about the appearance of the clock, claiming it looks like a gag gift. Still, they say, "It won us over with how effective and customizable it is."

Similar to our #8 selection, this app uses a gradual brightness increase to slowly wake you out of your sleep, before laying down the hammer and buzzing to wake you up. If you’re waking up angry or abruptly (more on this in a moment), then this is the perfect trick to keep ahead. Just ensure your alarm clock also has a USB charging slot to keep your phone nearby. This works well if you position it differently than your gradual light alarm clock, as if you’re getting two sunrises instead of one.


In China, a striking clock was devised by the Buddhist monk and inventor Yi Xing (683–727).[5] The Chinese engineers Zhang Sixun and Su Song integrated striking clock mechanisms in astronomical clocks in the 10th and 11th centuries, respectively.[6] A striking clock outside of China was the water-powered clock tower near the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, Syria, which struck once every hour. It was constructed by the Arab engineer al-Kaysarani in 1154. In 1235, an early monumental water-powered alarm clock that "announced the appointed hours of prayer and the time both by day and by night" was completed in the entrance hall of the Mustansiriya Madrasah in Baghdad.[7]

“This was a gift for my elderly, cognitively impaired mother. She was very often confused as to which day it was, the time of day, etc. She would show up at appointments on the wrong day, or think it was morning when it was evening. This clock is fantastic! It has made such a difference. Now she always knows what day and time it is. The clock is also very nice-looking. This was an excellent purchase and highly recommended. I can’t say enough good things about it.”

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