An on-trend take on a retro design, this 12" round wall clock brings a splash of color to any space in your home. This budget-friendly accent showcases a circular face bordered by alternating blocks of green, blue, and red hues with black Roman numerals in the center. Its plastic frame ensures that it’s lightweight and easy to hang, while its metallic pierced hands offer subtle shimmer. This piece does not include batteries.

There’s a lot of science when it comes to sleeping, and there’s never a short supply of sleep-related tests going on. One of our favorite electronic brands here on Gear Hungry has made the most effective clock (in our humble opinion), and it’s the #8 pick: Philips Wake-Up HF3505. Slow light build mimics the sunrise, and gently pulls you out of a sleep-like trance before hitting you with some serious sound. Between price, effectiveness, and the fact that we didn’t have to chase it around the room (sorry Clocky, we’re not morning people), we absolutely loved this one.

Clocks have different ways of displaying time, connected to their internal clockwork type. Analog clocks usually indicate time using angles. Digital clocks display a numeric representation of time. Two numeric display formats are commonly used on digital clocks: 24-hour notation and 12-hour notation. Most digital clocks use electronic mechanisms and LCD, LED, or VFD displays. For convenience, distance, telephony or blindness, auditory clocks present the time as sounds. There are also clocks for the blind that have displays that can be read by using the sense of touch. Some of these are similar to normal analog displays, but are constructed so the hands can be felt without damaging them. The evolution of the technology of clocks continues today. The study of timekeeping is known as horology.
But where OK to Wake! really shines (pun intended) is in its unique feature that parents love; the clock will glow green and show a cute face when it's an acceptable time for your little one to get out of bed. That means even very young children can learn when it's okay to go looking for mommy or daddy — no need to be able to actually read the time. As your child grows, you can stop using the glow feature, and simply use the device as a regular, albeit cuter than average, alarm clock.
Many devices can be used to mark passage of time without respect to reference time (time of day, minutes, etc.) and can be useful for measuring duration or intervals. Examples of such duration timers are candle clocks, incense clocks and the hourglass. Both the candle clock and the incense clock work on the same principle wherein the consumption of resources is more or less constant allowing reasonably precise and repeatable estimates of time passages. In the hourglass, fine sand pouring through a tiny hole at a constant rate indicates an arbitrary, predetermined, passage of time. The resource is not consumed but re-used.
Some clocks, usually digital ones, include an optical projector that shines a magnified image of the time display onto a screen or onto a surface such as an indoor ceiling or wall. The digits are large enough to be easily read, without using glasses, by persons with moderately imperfect vision, so the clocks are convenient for use in their bedrooms. Usually, the timekeeping circuitry has a battery as a backup source for an uninterrupted power supply to keep the clock on time, while the projection light only works when the unit is connected to an A.C. supply. Completely battery-powered portable versions resembling flashlights are also available.
This oversized aged metal wall clock is 31.5" square and is finished in aged white and gray. The aged dial with aged black Roman numerals and aged black spade hour and minute hands sits behind a glass crystal and is surrounded by a formed metal bezel finished in aged white and gray. Quartz, battery-operated movement requires one AA sized battery (not included). One year warranty and Free Shipping.
Health chose the Sonic Bomb as one of the best alarm clocks for heavy sleepers, commenting that the flashing lights, loud sound, and bed shaker should "deliver the full sensory message that grave danger awaits unless you get out of bed." Reviews.com likes it as well, although they aren't crazy about the appearance of the clock, claiming it looks like a gag gift. Still, they say, "It won us over with how effective and customizable it is."

Inspired by a vintage bicycle wheel, this awesome Oversized Kennan Metal 26.8" Wall Clock lends a touch of industrial chic style to your walls. This factory-chic timekeeper features rusted Arabic numerals, classic black spade hands on a battery-operated rusted gear movement, and gleaming metal wheel spoke accents. Create a factory-chic focal point in your dining room by mounting this piece on the wall over a reclaimed wood sideboard for guests to admire at your next dinner party or add it to...
A clock mechanism may be used to control a device according to time, e.g. a central heating system, a VCR, or a time bomb (see: digital counter). Such mechanisms are usually called timers. Clock mechanisms are also used to drive devices such as solar trackers and astronomical telescopes, which have to turn at accurately controlled speeds to counteract the rotation of the Earth.
Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]
Hang clocks in places where they’ll be most useful, such as the kitchen or above your desk. They should be easily visible and complement the design of the space. Large wall clocks are ideal for over a fireplace, above an entry table or showcased in an art niche. Smaller wall clocks can be added to your kitchen, home office or child’s bedroom to help keep your day on track.
A standard alarm is often enough to wake most humans, but some people just sleep more deeply than others. For these individuals, the aptly titled SmartShaker 2 is ideal. The thin alarm clock fits comfortably under your pillow and vibrates to wake you. This feature also makes the SmartShaker 2 perfect for those with hearing impairments and couples with different sleep schedules.

“I bought this light because my partner and I need to be up early for work, but our bedroom has very poor natural light. Within a week, I’ve already noticed a difference in my energy levels and mood. The sunrise simulation works perfectly; by the time the ‘alarm’ (peaceful bird noises) goes off, I’m already feeling naturally awake — not groggy or jolted out of my sleep. I feel much more rested, and my average resting heart rate reflects that. I also really love the sunset feature. I wasn’t expecting to get much use out of it, but I feel like it does a great job of helping me settle into bed at the end of the day.”
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