Brimming with an antiqued appeal, this clean-lined wood and glass wall clock brings function and flair to your home. Its distressed details pair perfectly with reclaimed teak wood accents while its neutral color palettes blend effortlessly into any monochromatic look. Add this piece to the den to bring the traditional flair to a cozy coastal arrangement, then pair it with woven rattan furniture and driftwood decor for a complementing look. Round out the room with a hand-woven jute rug to define...
While an analog dial makes it easy, this clock is certainly not just for telling time! Let its colorful frame imbue a sense of playful appeal into your lodge-inspired living room look, lovely sitting atop your mantel as the fire flickers down below. Whether you're lounging on the sofa after a spirited skiing session or simply warming up with a steaming mug of hot cocoa, you can't go wrong by making the whole room shine with an antler-adorned chandelier hanging overhead and tying it all together...
The apparent position of the Sun in the sky moves over the course of each day, reflecting the rotation of the Earth. Shadows cast by stationary objects move correspondingly, so their positions can be used to indicate the time of day. A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a (usually) flat surface, which has markings that correspond to the hours.[7] Sundials can be horizontal, vertical, or in other orientations. Sundials were widely used in ancient times.[8] With the knowledge of latitude, a well-constructed sundial can measure local solar time with reasonable accuracy, within a minute or two. Sundials continued to be used to monitor the performance of clocks until the modern era.[citation needed]

Water clocks, also known as clepsydrae (sg: clepsydra), along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments, with the only exceptions being the vertical gnomon and the day counting tally stick.[9] Given their great antiquity, where and when they first existed is not known and perhaps unknowable. The bowl-shaped outflow is the simplest form of a water clock and is known to have existed in Babylon and in Egypt around the 16th century BC. Other regions of the world, including India and China, also have early evidence of water clocks, but the earliest dates are less certain. Some authors, however, write about water clocks appearing as early as 4000 BC in these regions of the world.[10]
Another type of analog clock is the sundial, which tracks the sun continuously, registering the time by the shadow position of its gnomon. Because the sun does not adjust to daylight saving time, users must add an hour during that time. Corrections must also be made for the equation of time, and for the difference between the longitudes of the sundial and of the central meridian of the time zone that is being used (i.e. 15 degrees east of the prime meridian for each hour that the time zone is ahead of GMT). Sundials use some or part of the 24 hour analog dial. There also exist clocks which use a digital display despite having an analog mechanism—these are commonly referred to as flip clocks. Alternative systems have been proposed. For example, the "Twelv" clock indicates the current hour using one of twelve colors, and indicates the minute by showing a proportion of a circular disk, similar to a moon phase.[74]
This metal wire case wall clock is finished in antique black with antique gold highlights. The pendulum bob, with matching finish, is an open circle, suspended on a metal pendulum. A black bezel surrounds the convex acrylic crystal. The dial features an antique Antique Red background with gold Arabic numerals and Antique gold spade hands. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement. One Year Warranty.

Early clock dials did not indicate minutes and seconds. A clock with a dial indicating minutes was illustrated in a 1475 manuscript by Paulus Almanus,[31] and some 15th-century clocks in Germany indicated minutes and seconds.[32] An early record of a seconds hand on a clock dates back to about 1560 on a clock now in the Fremersdorf collection.[33]:417–418[34]
The Howard Miller 613-229 Alcott offers an impressive pediment featuring a sculptured cove and enlarged dentil molding. An off-white Roman numeral dial features a solid brass bezel and decorative accents between the numerals. Hinged front door with latch. A polished and raised brass pendulum with grid and polished chime rods add a distinctive touch to the interior. Finished in Cherry Bordeaux on select hardwoods and veneers. German made Keinenger Key-wound, quarter hour Westminster chime movement with hour count. Chime silence lever and durable bronze bushings. One Year warranty and Free Shipping.
Scientific studies on sleep having shown that sleep stage at awakening is an important factor in amplifying sleep inertia. Alarm clocks involving sleep stage monitoring appeared on the market in 2005.[22] The alarm clocks use sensing technologies such as EEG electrodes and accelerometers to wake people from sleep.[23][24]Dawn simulators are another technology meant to mediate these effects.[25]
“This was a gift for my elderly, cognitively impaired mother. She was very often confused as to which day it was, the time of day, etc. She would show up at appointments on the wrong day, or think it was morning when it was evening. This clock is fantastic! It has made such a difference. Now she always knows what day and time it is. The clock is also very nice-looking. This was an excellent purchase and highly recommended. I can’t say enough good things about it.”
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