Only at Best Buy Answer all your questions and share your playlist with this Insignia portable wireless speaker. Featuring Google Assistant, this compact speaker lets you search the internet or set your schedule with just the sound of your voice. Bluetooth compatibility on this Insignia portable wireless speaker allows sharing and casting to multiple devices, including phones, tablets and even other speakers.

Bring contemporary and clean-lined looks to your walls with this understated wall clock, this perfect mix of subtle, airy looks and midcentury modern aesthetics in your space. Featuring a simple rectangular metal frame finished in antique brass and distressed gray, this clock brings a warm look to your ensemble, while its elongated Roman numerals offer an updated twist on a classic look. To clean, simply wipe with a damp cloth.
Sounds pretty self explanatory, right? You have to get up, position two thumbs on the bottom of the screen, and turn around according to the predesignated amount of spins. You’ll actually have to jerk yourself around, and by the end of it, you’ll look at the bed and say, “Well, I’m already up.” At least, that’s the hope of the app developers. This one comes in handy if paired with louder alarm clocks, as well.
The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–348 BC) was said to possess a large water clock with an unspecified alarm signal similar to the sound of a water organ; he used it at night, possibly for signaling the beginning of his lectures at dawn (Athenaeus 4.174c).[2] The Hellenistic engineer and inventor Ctesibius (fl. 285–222 BC) fitted his clepsydras with dial and pointer for indicating the time, and added elaborate "alarm systems, which could be made to drop pebbles on a gong, or blow trumpets (by forcing bell-jars down into water and taking the compressed air through a beating reed) at pre-set times" (Vitruv 11.11).[3]
Until advances in the late twentieth century, navigation depended on the ability to measure latitude and longitude. Latitude can be determined through celestial navigation; the measurement of longitude requires accurate knowledge of time. This need was a major motivation for the development of accurate mechanical clocks. John Harrison created the first highly accurate marine chronometer in the mid-18th century. The Noon gun in Cape Town still fires an accurate signal to allow ships to check their chronometers. Many buildings near major ports used to have (some still do) a large ball mounted on a tower or mast arranged to drop at a pre-determined time, for the same purpose. While satellite navigation systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) require unprecedentedly accurate knowledge of time, this is supplied by equipment on the satellites; vehicles no longer need timekeeping equipment.
Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century,[25][26][27] although they are often erroneously credited to Nuremberg watchmaker Peter Henlein (or Henle, or Hele) around 1511.[28][29][30] The earliest existing spring driven clock is the chamber clock given to Phillip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, around 1430, now in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum.[4] Spring power presented clockmakers with a new problem: how to keep the clock movement running at a constant rate as the spring ran down. This resulted in the invention of the stackfreed and the fusee in the 15th century, and many other innovations, down to the invention of the modern going barrel in 1760.
The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]
The apparent position of the Sun in the sky moves over the course of each day, reflecting the rotation of the Earth. Shadows cast by stationary objects move correspondingly, so their positions can be used to indicate the time of day. A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a (usually) flat surface, which has markings that correspond to the hours.[7] Sundials can be horizontal, vertical, or in other orientations. Sundials were widely used in ancient times.[8] With the knowledge of latitude, a well-constructed sundial can measure local solar time with reasonable accuracy, within a minute or two. Sundials continued to be used to monitor the performance of clocks until the modern era.[citation needed]
Bring contemporary and clean-lined looks to your walls with this understated wall clock, this perfect mix of subtle, airy looks and midcentury modern aesthetics in your space. Featuring a simple rectangular metal frame finished in antique brass and distressed gray, this clock brings a warm look to your ensemble, while its elongated Roman numerals offer an updated twist on a classic look. To clean, simply wipe with a damp cloth.
Many devices can be used to mark passage of time without respect to reference time (time of day, minutes, etc.) and can be useful for measuring duration or intervals. Examples of such duration timers are candle clocks, incense clocks and the hourglass. Both the candle clock and the incense clock work on the same principle wherein the consumption of resources is more or less constant allowing reasonably precise and repeatable estimates of time passages. In the hourglass, fine sand pouring through a tiny hole at a constant rate indicates an arbitrary, predetermined, passage of time. The resource is not consumed but re-used.
Any expansion or contraction of the rod caused by changes of temperature will affect the timekeeping of a pendulum; e.g., a pendulum clock with a steel rod will lose one second a day for a rise in temperature of approximately 4 °F (2.2 °C). For accurate timekeeping, the length of the pendulum must be kept as nearly constant as possible. This may be done in several ways, some of which use the differing coefficients of expansion (the amount of expansion per degree change in temperature) of different metals to obtain a cancelling-out effect. In one popular compensation method, the bob consists of a glass or metal jar containing a suitable amount of mercury. The gridiron pendulum employs rods of different metal, usually brass and steel, while in the zinc-iron tube the pendulum rod is made of concentric tubes of zinc and iron. An improved method, however, is to make the pendulum rod from a special alloy called Invar. This material has such a small coefficient of expansion that small changes of temperature have a negligible effect and can easily be compensated for if required.
Bring elegant, antique style to your walls with this 23.25" wall clock. Crafted of manufactured wood and plastic, this clock’s dial showcases large Arabic numerals printed in weathered beige over the hand-painted royal red face. A battery-operated movement keeps spade hour and minute hands ticking away in time over the words “Hotel Westminster” and “Pairs Rue de la Paix” written in swirling cursive script. Distressed details and fleur-de-lis accents round out the design, imbuing a...
Who doesn't love an alarm clock that verbally lets you know it's time to get up and start your day? Step aside, Siri, because "Reminder Rosie" is where it's at. You can easily record up to 25 different alarm-reminders at 6 seconds each. So why not wake up to a recording of your kids saying, "Good morning, Mom!"? (Or maybe you don't want that.) We love how you can turn off the alarm by quickly pressing a button or just saying out loud, "Reminder Off." 
In the 13th century, Al-Jazari, an engineer from Mesopotamia (lived 1136–1206) who worked for Artuqid king of Diyar-Bakr, Nasir al-Din, made numerous clocks of all shapes and sizes. A book on his work described 50 mechanical devices in 6 categories, including water clocks. The most reputed clocks included the Elephant, Scribe and Castle clocks, all of which have been successfully reconstructed. As well as telling the time, these grand clocks were symbols of status, grandeur and wealth of the Urtuq State.[citation needed]
Bring an earthy touch to your walls with this understated clock, a rustic accent for your space. Featuring a paneled distressed wood design with metal Roman numerals in a distressed gray finish, this clock brings a neutral touch to your look. Measuring at 27.5" x 27.5, this clock fits over any console or mantel space. Upkeep is easy—just wipe clean with a damp cloth—and install a AA battery (not included) to operate.

Clockmakers developed their art in various ways. Building smaller clocks was a technical challenge, as was improving accuracy and reliability. Clocks could be impressive showpieces to demonstrate skilled craftsmanship, or less expensive, mass-produced items for domestic use. The escapement in particular was an important factor affecting the clock's accuracy, so many different mechanisms were tried.


Simple clocks intended mainly for notification were installed in towers, and did not always require faces or hands. They would have announced the canonical hours or intervals between set times of prayer. Canonical hours varied in length as the times of sunrise and sunset shifted. The more sophisticated astronomical clocks would have had moving dials or hands, and would have shown the time in various time systems, including Italian hours, canonical hours, and time as measured by astronomers at the time. Both styles of clock started acquiring extravagant features such as automata.
Howard Miller 625-613 Company Time II Large Wall Clock is a 34" wall clock with an antique nickel frame. The center dial is a bubbled panel that is heavily distressed and deeply dented for an aged appearance. The individual off-white number panels are curved and dented with Black Roman numerals centered on each panel. The accurate quartz movement requires one "AA" battery. Always measure your area to make sure the wall you have will accommodate this large of clock. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping.
For some scientific work timing of the utmost accuracy is essential. It is also necessary to have a standard of the maximum accuracy against which working clocks can be calibrated. An ideal clock would give the time to unlimited accuracy, but this is not realisable. Many physical processes, in particular including some transitions between atomic energy levels, occur at exceedingly stable frequency; counting cycles of such a process can give a very accurate and consistent time—clocks which work this way are usually called atomic clocks. Such clocks are typically large, very expensive, require a controlled environment, and are far more accurate than required for most purposes; they are typically used in a standards laboratory.
Wall clocks offer a decorative alternative to traditional wall art while also serving a practical function. Whether you want an oversized wall clock to mount above the fireplace and serve as a focal point in your living room or a small model to hang in your kitchen to help keep your family on schedule on school days, Overstock carries the perfect model for your needs. Trusted brands, including Westclox, La Crosse, and Hans Andersen Home, ensure accuracy and durability. From retro-inspired metal clocks in colorful finishes to classic wooden case clocks featuring lustrous stains, Overstock carries wall clocks in an array of styles, sizes, and types with a wide range of features. Read on to learn more about the inventory of wall clocks at Overstock.
Until advances in the late twentieth century, navigation depended on the ability to measure latitude and longitude. Latitude can be determined through celestial navigation; the measurement of longitude requires accurate knowledge of time. This need was a major motivation for the development of accurate mechanical clocks. John Harrison created the first highly accurate marine chronometer in the mid-18th century. The Noon gun in Cape Town still fires an accurate signal to allow ships to check their chronometers. Many buildings near major ports used to have (some still do) a large ball mounted on a tower or mast arranged to drop at a pre-determined time, for the same purpose. While satellite navigation systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) require unprecedentedly accurate knowledge of time, this is supplied by equipment on the satellites; vehicles no longer need timekeeping equipment.
Time flies when you’re having fun, and you’re going to have a great time updated your look with this chic clock. As much an accent as it is a functional tool, this elegant design will instantly elevate any tabletop display. This clock blends modern minimalism with a pop of glam thanks to its solid-toned background, simple white hour marks, and glossy metallic frame. Try setting it on your master suite nightstand, so you can keep your eye on the time during your morning routine. Next, lean...
Bring bold, eye-popping appeal to your walls with this absolutely striking wall clock, the perfect finishing touch to your industrial-inspired ensemble. Crafted from welded steel and featuring a deep black finish, this understated and chic clock lends a touch of simple style to your look, while its 39" diameter ensures it will make a big impact wherever you decide to hang it. Hang it up over muted stripe wallpaper in the living room to let the patterns show through this clock's openwork design...
A standard alarm is often enough to wake most humans, but some people just sleep more deeply than others. For these individuals, the aptly titled SmartShaker 2 is ideal. The thin alarm clock fits comfortably under your pillow and vibrates to wake you. This feature also makes the SmartShaker 2 perfect for those with hearing impairments and couples with different sleep schedules.

“Great alarm clock for the price. Gigantic numbers for my old eyes. Very basic, easy to set, just what I wanted. Alarm is loud even on low [with] an awful sound that would wake the dead. But that sound makes me get right up, so it does exactly what it’s supposed to do. If you want a soft gentle caress to wake you, get something else, but this is a good alarm and easy to use.”

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