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If the only thing that will get you out the door in the morning is some serious nagging, Clockman is for you. This chatty clock refuses to shut up, even after you get out of bed. He'll greet you at your desired time, sing while you get dressed, and even yell if you anger him. While Clockman speaks only Japanese for now, his wake-up-and-get-going message isn't lost in translation.

A clock accent and 9 metal gears make this vintaged wall decor a statement-making addition to any room. Hang it in the den for a rustic-chic focal point or add it to a cluster of canvas prints for a dynamic gallery display. Nothing adorns your living space like a lavish timepiece, and with the Chellis Wall Clock you are sure to receive a lot of compliments. Intricately designed, this clock is an eye-catching piece that will elevate the beauty of your decor manifold. A rustic and cutting-edge...
Here is a clock that will look great in any room in the house and it never needs a plug! This Water Clock is powered by ordinary tap water. Never needs batteries or electricity. Just fill this Water clock with water and you are on your way to more eco-friendly home. After about 6 months to a year you may need to dump the water out (your can pour it into a plant) and refill. The clock will remember the time as you do so. It even has an alarm. Great for traveling as well. Why would you ever use...
Although the mechanisms they use vary, all oscillating clocks, mechanical, digital and atomic, work similarly and can be divided into analogous parts.[64][65][66] They consist of an object that repeats the same motion over and over again, an oscillator, with a precisely constant time interval between each repetition, or 'beat'. Attached to the oscillator is a controller device, which sustains the oscillator's motion by replacing the energy it loses to friction, and converts its oscillations into a series of pulses. The pulses are then counted by some type of counter, and the number of counts is converted into convenient units, usually seconds, minutes, hours, etc. Finally some kind of indicator displays the result in human readable form.
Use of a Clock is optional. All key date-time classes also have a now() factory method that uses the system clock in the default time zone. The primary purpose of this abstraction is to allow alternate clocks to be plugged in as and when required. Applications use an object to obtain the current time rather than a static method. This can simplify testing.
Analog clocks usually use a clock face which indicates time using rotating pointers called "hands" on a fixed numbered dial or dials. The standard clock face, known universally throughout the world, has a short "hour hand" which indicates the hour on a circular dial of 12 hours, making two revolutions per day, and a longer "minute hand" which indicates the minutes in the current hour on the same dial, which is also divided into 60 minutes. It may also have a "second hand" which indicates the seconds in the current minute. The only other widely used clock face today is the 24 hour analog dial, because of the use of 24 hour time in military organizations and timetables. Before the modern clock face was standardized during the Industrial Revolution, many other face designs were used throughout the years, including dials divided into 6, 8, 10, and 24 hours. During the French Revolution the French government tried to introduce a 10-hour clock, as part of their decimal-based metric system of measurement, but it didn't catch on. An Italian 6 hour clock was developed in the 18th century, presumably to save power (a clock or watch striking 24 times uses more power).
Another type of analog clock is the sundial, which tracks the sun continuously, registering the time by the shadow position of its gnomon. Because the sun does not adjust to daylight saving time, users must add an hour during that time. Corrections must also be made for the equation of time, and for the difference between the longitudes of the sundial and of the central meridian of the time zone that is being used (i.e. 15 degrees east of the prime meridian for each hour that the time zone is ahead of GMT). Sundials use some or part of the 24 hour analog dial. There also exist clocks which use a digital display despite having an analog mechanism—these are commonly referred to as flip clocks. Alternative systems have been proposed. For example, the "Twelv" clock indicates the current hour using one of twelve colors, and indicates the minute by showing a proportion of a circular disk, similar to a moon phase.[74]
The clock features a solid wood core and wooden mini balls finished in rich brown tones. There are numerous silver rods radiating out from the core with some bearing wooden balls and others not. The inner assembly of balls is randomly spaced while there are twelve balls reserved for the extreme ends of hour markers. The clock is driven by a high quality Quartz movement (requiring only one AA battery; not included) 19.5 in.

In mechanical clocks, the low Q of the balance wheel or pendulum oscillator made them very sensitive to the disturbing effect of the impulses of the escapement, so the escapement had a great effect on the accuracy of the clock, and many escapement designs were tried. The higher Q of resonators in electronic clocks makes them relatively insensitive to the disturbing effects of the drive power, so the driving oscillator circuit is a much less critical component.[2]


Electric clocks that are powered from the AC supply often use synchronous motors. The supply current alternates with a frequency of 50 hertz in many countries, and 60 hertz in others. The rotor of the motor rotates at a speed that is related to the alternation frequency. Appropriate gearing converts this rotation speed to the correct ones for the hands of the analog clock. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all. Time in these cases is measured in several ways, such as by the alternation of the AC supply, vibration of a tuning fork, the behaviour of quartz crystals, or the quantum vibrations of atoms. Electronic circuits divide these high-frequency oscillations to slower ones that drive the time display. Even mechanical clocks have since come to be largely powered by batteries, removing the need for winding.

A: There’s always going to be a sleep-related study going on, but you might be surprised to find that it’s not a one-size-fits-all answer. There’s about 1% of the population, known as The Sleepless Elite, who don’t need to clock-in a bunch of hours with their pillows. Some of us just run better off of less sleep, even if we don’t realize it right away. There’s such a thing as oversleeping, too, so how do you really know your specific sleep needs?


Clocks have a secret life: they're responsible for much more than telling time. From pocket watches to grandfather clocks, a time piece has usually been used to make a statement about the owner as much as it has about the hour. With this clock, you can make a statement in rustic style. Featuring numerals in a lighter inset wood, this piece measures 29.75'' H x 29.75'' W x 2.38'' D. Because both the hands and wood are dark, we recommend displaying this piece in a well-lit area for easier...
In 1815, Francis Ronalds published the first electric clock powered by dry pile batteries.[48] Alexander Bain, Scottish clockmaker, patented the electric clock in 1840. The electric clock's mainspring is wound either with an electric motor or with an electromagnet and armature. In 1841, he first patented the electromagnetic pendulum. By the end of the nineteenth century, the advent of the dry cell battery made it feasible to use electric power in clocks. Spring or weight driven clocks that use electricity, either alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC), to rewind the spring or raise the weight of a mechanical clock would be classified as an electromechanical clock. This classification would also apply to clocks that employ an electrical impulse to propel the pendulum. In electromechanical clocks the electricity serves no time keeping function. These types of clocks were made as individual timepieces but more commonly used in synchronized time installations in schools, businesses, factories, railroads and government facilities as a master clock and slave clocks.
A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The position of a ship at sea could be determined with reasonable accuracy if a navigator could refer to a clock that lost or gained less than about 10 seconds per day. This clock could not contain a pendulum, which would be virtually useless on a rocking ship. In 1714, the British government offered large financial rewards to the value of 20,000 pounds,[42] for anyone who could determine longitude accurately. John Harrison, who dedicated his life to improving the accuracy of his clocks, later received considerable sums under the Longitude Act.
A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The position of a ship at sea could be determined with reasonable accuracy if a navigator could refer to a clock that lost or gained less than about 10 seconds per day. This clock could not contain a pendulum, which would be virtually useless on a rocking ship. In 1714, the British government offered large financial rewards to the value of 20,000 pounds,[42] for anyone who could determine longitude accurately. John Harrison, who dedicated his life to improving the accuracy of his clocks, later received considerable sums under the Longitude Act.
A clock that looks good and runs smoothly instantly adds charm and functionality to your living space. For a fresh take on the traditional wall clock, consider this eye-catching design. Introducing Ribbonwood by Umbra Add a modern, minimalist twist to telling time. With Ribbonwood, you get a stylish piece of wall décor and a functional wall clock all-in-one. Made with natural beech wood that’s been shaped to resemble overlapping ribbons, this unique clock features contrasting hands that...
A. Like many items today, the amount you’ll pay for an alarm clock depends on how much technology you want layered onto it. If you desire nothing but a simple analog alarm clock that rouses you with a single tone, you could spend as little as $10. A slightly more sophisticated clock radio might cost $20 or so. If you want a deluxe digital alarm clock with screen projection, Bluetooth capability, MP3 player, or other cool features, you’re looking at a price of anywhere from $40 to $90.
Until advances in the late twentieth century, navigation depended on the ability to measure latitude and longitude. Latitude can be determined through celestial navigation; the measurement of longitude requires accurate knowledge of time. This need was a major motivation for the development of accurate mechanical clocks. John Harrison created the first highly accurate marine chronometer in the mid-18th century. The Noon gun in Cape Town still fires an accurate signal to allow ships to check their chronometers. Many buildings near major ports used to have (some still do) a large ball mounted on a tower or mast arranged to drop at a pre-determined time, for the same purpose. While satellite navigation systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) require unprecedentedly accurate knowledge of time, this is supplied by equipment on the satellites; vehicles no longer need timekeeping equipment.
These mechanical clocks were intended for two main purposes: for signalling and notification (e.g. the timing of services and public events), and for modeling the solar system. The former purpose is administrative, the latter arises naturally given the scholarly interests in astronomy, science, astrology, and how these subjects integrated with the religious philosophy of the time. The astrolabe was used both by astronomers and astrologers, and it was natural to apply a clockwork drive to the rotating plate to produce a working model of the solar system.
A well-made large wall clock that looks good and runs smoothly can bring charm and functionality to any space. For a fresh take on the traditional clock, consider this eye-catching design... Introducing Rimwood by Umbra Every Umbra wall clock is tested in our factory before shipping to ensure it works perfectly. This, coupled with a sleek and modern design, ensures you’re getting a clock that not only tells time accurately but also looks great. This classically-inspired clock has a truly...
Wall clocks both help you keep time and accent your space as decor that fills an empty wall space above the mantel or kitchen counter. For a clock that serves dual purposes, consider a numberless option—the minimalist look doesn't exude obvious functionality, but the time is still obvious and the clock works as a unique piece of hanging wall art—perfect for the living room or dining room. If you're not necessarily looking to make a bold style statement but still want a chic timepiece, embossed clocks fit the bill. The numbers add interest and dimension and keep the clock looking artful—another great option for the dining room or kitchen. For a family-friendly clock, look for large faces and clean-lined, easy-to-read numbering. With form and function in perfect accordance, this type also fits in beautifully on a bedroom wall. Don't forget about the home office, where time is of the essence. Minimalist designs in handsome walnut and sleek iron can add either a throwback or modern feel to the space. Wall clocks of all designs not only keep you, your family and your guests aware of the time, but also serve as great decorative elements to your home.
This SmartSet Alarm Radio with Bluetooth Speaker Desktop Clock is a thing of the past. The digital tuning clock radio automatically sets itself on the first use to the correct year, month, date, day, and time. The clock radio features Bluetooth v4.1 digital tuning FM radio. Includes a USB output for mobile charging (2.1a 5V) and a large and easy-to-read LED display. The alarm can be programmed to operate on weekdays only, weekends only, or all seven days of the week. Set the alarm to wake you...
late 14c., clokke, originally "clock with bells," probably from Middle Dutch clocke (Dutch klok) "a clock," from Old North French cloque (Old French cloke, Modern French cloche), from Medieval Latin (7c.) clocca "bell," probably from Celtic (cf. Old Irish clocc, Welsh cloch, Manx clagg "a bell") and spread by Irish missionaries (unless the Celtic words are from Latin); ultimately of imitative origin.
Sony always makes good products, and this little cube packs a powerful alarm in its punch. When you go for the minimalist design, you’re able to incorporate more features for less money, as well as keep the nature of the product intact: in this case, it’s supposed to wake you up, and not be too flashy. You get a backup battery just in case the power fails you during a storm, but you also get ten programmable radio station buttons.
Some clocks, called 'flip clocks', have digital displays that work mechanically. The digits are painted on sheets of material which are mounted like the pages of a book. Once a minute, a page is turned over to reveal the next digit. These displays are usually easier to read in brightly lit conditions than LCDs or LEDs. Also, they do not go back to 12:00 after a power interruption. Flip clocks generally do not have electronic mechanisms. Usually, they are driven by AC-synchronous motors.
Some predecessors to the modern clock may be considered as "clocks" that are based on movement in nature: A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a flat surface. There is a range of duration timers, a well-known example being the hourglass. Water clocks, along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments. A major advance occurred with the invention of the verge escapement, which made possible the first mechanical clocks around 1300 in Europe, which kept time with oscillating timekeepers like balance wheels.[1][2][3][4]
The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–348 BC) was said to possess a large water clock with an unspecified alarm signal similar to the sound of a water organ; he used it at night, possibly for signaling the beginning of his lectures at dawn (Athenaeus 4.174c).[2] The Hellenistic engineer and inventor Ctesibius (fl. 285–222 BC) fitted his clepsydras with dial and pointer for indicating the time, and added elaborate "alarm systems, which could be made to drop pebbles on a gong, or blow trumpets (by forcing bell-jars down into water and taking the compressed air through a beating reed) at pre-set times" (Vitruv 11.11).[3]

If the last thing you do before closing your eyes for the night is pick up your cell phone to set the alarm, how likely is it that you're just going to do that one thing, then set the phone down on the nightstand? Admit it, you're probably going to check your Instagram, send a text or two, play just one more round of your favorite game, or surf the web.


Some water clock designs were developed independently and some knowledge was transferred through the spread of trade. Pre-modern societies do not have the same precise timekeeping requirements that exist in modern industrial societies, where every hour of work or rest is monitored, and work may start or finish at any time regardless of external conditions. Instead, water clocks in ancient societies were used mainly for astrological reasons. These early water clocks were calibrated with a sundial. While never reaching the level of accuracy of a modern timepiece, the water clock was the most accurate and commonly used timekeeping device for millennia, until it was replaced by the more accurate pendulum clock in 17th-century Europe.
Certainly not just for telling time, this oversized wall clock makes a statement whether set in the entryway or above your living room mantel. Its frame is crafted from metal with an antiqued silver leaf design for metallic allure. The openwork design allows it to seamlessly blend with your ensemble, while a fun analog dial lends a pop of playful appeal. Requires one AA battery to operate.
Add a dash of visual intrigue and stylish sophistication to your ensemble with this eye-catching wall clock, the perfect piece for your well-curated aesthetic. Hang it up on a deep blue or charcoal-toned wall in the living room to complement its shimmering silver finish and hard-lined metal design, then offset its striking starburst silhouette by arranging a console table below with glossy ceramic vases and simple metal picture frames. Curating a midcentury-modern aesthetic in your space? Lean...

Whether you’re styling an accent wall or rounding out your decor, a retro-inspired wall clock like this one draws the eye while adding some utility to your ensemble. The large numbers make this clock easy to read, and with quartz movement, it features a more accurate reading. The minimalist black and white face and the sleek silver frame imbue it with contemporary appeal, making this piece easy to hang in a variety of design styles. Measures 15'' in diameter.


A: There’s always going to be a sleep-related study going on, but you might be surprised to find that it’s not a one-size-fits-all answer. There’s about 1% of the population, known as The Sleepless Elite, who don’t need to clock-in a bunch of hours with their pillows. Some of us just run better off of less sleep, even if we don’t realize it right away. There’s such a thing as oversleeping, too, so how do you really know your specific sleep needs?
Certainly not just for telling time, wall clocks are perfect for adding artful appeal to your kitchen wall or acting as a focal point above the living room mantel. Take this one for example: crafted from metal, its frame features an openwork design and a black finish for a look that fits right into traditional abodes and modern farmhouses alike. Measures about 30'' in diameter. Requires one AA battery to operate.
The OK to Wake! alarm clock and nap timer is a useful tool for parents with young kids learning the importance of sleep schedules. When it's OK for a child to get out of bed (aka when the alarm or nap timer goes off) the clock will light up green, providing an easy-to-understand visual cue for little ones to start their day. It even has interchangeable face plates to suit aesthetic preferences.

Incorporating clocks into your home design is a way to better keep track of time and can make a unique style statement in your home. Clocks work well in every room of your home, from the living room to the bedroom. You can find wall clocks, mantel clocks, grandfather clocks and outdoor clocks that fit your personal style. Large wall clocks look beautiful in your home and are elegant focal piece in your living room. Make sure that you match the style and texture of your clock to the décor in your home. You can use stylish clocks in your home to accessorize thematic designs and emphasize specific areas of your home.

A silent instrument missing such a striking mechanism has traditionally been known as a timepiece.[5] In general usage today, a "clock" refers to any device for measuring and displaying the time. Watches and other timepieces that can be carried on one's person are often distinguished from clocks.[6] Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century. During the 15th and 16th centuries, clockmaking flourished. The next development in accuracy occurred after 1656 with the invention of the pendulum clock. A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The electric clock was patented in 1840. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all.


Vintage, contemporary, rustic, classic, novelty, and traditional are just a few of the styles of wall clocks available. Classic and traditional clocks generally feature simple numbers or roman numerals that make checking the time at a glance easy. Rustic, nautical, and country themes typically feature pictures of animals or rural and seaside scenes. Contemporary styles often use an abstract design that may lack numbers altogether. Vintage and antique styles of wall clocks may be simple or ornate, and have a midcentury or older look. A wide variety of fun novelty options are also available, ranging from famous characters and well-known brands to glow-in-the-dark and reversed numeral designs.

Most digital computers depend on an internal signal at constant frequency to synchronize processing; this is referred to as a clock signal. (A few research projects are developing CPUs based on asynchronous circuits.) Some equipment, including computers, also maintains time and date for use as required; this is referred to as time-of-day clock, and is distinct from the system clock signal, although possibly based on counting its cycles.


A clock accent and 9 metal gears make this vintaged wall decor a statement-making addition to any room. Hang it in the den for a rustic-chic focal point or add it to a cluster of canvas prints for a dynamic gallery display. Nothing adorns your living space like a lavish timepiece, and with the Chellis Wall Clock you are sure to receive a lot of compliments. Intricately designed, this clock is an eye-catching piece that will elevate the beauty of your decor manifold. A rustic and cutting-edge...

A clock radio is an alarm clock and radio receiver integrated in one device. The clock may turn on the radio at a designated time to wake the user, and may also include a buzzer. Typically, they are placed on the bedside stand. Some models offer dual alarm and "snooze", a large button on the top that stops the alarm and sets it to ring again a few minutes later.[18] Some clock radios also have a "sleep" timer, which turns the music from radio on for a set amount of time (usually around one hour). This is useful for people who like to fall asleep with the radio on.
This Technology Curved Tabletop Clock and weather instrument offers curve-appeal. It also offers dynamic white LED display with a mirrored lens which can be seen from across the room and in darkened rooms. Features dual alarms with adjustable settings: HI/LO sound volume, programmable alarm days, snooze duration (5-60 mins), and auto-dim. Displays your current indoor temperature (F only) and humidity and can charge a mobile device with a bonus USB port in the back of the clock. Table standing...
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