Greek astronomer Andronicus of Cyrrhus supervised the construction of the Tower of the Winds in Athens in the 1st century B.C.[11] The Greek and Roman civilizations are credited for initially advancing water clock design to include complex gearing, which was connected to fanciful automata and also resulted in improved accuracy. These advances were passed on through Byzantium and Islamic times, eventually making their way back to Europe. Independently, the Chinese developed their own advanced water clocks(水鐘)in 725 A.D., passing their ideas on to Korea and Japan.

The next development in accuracy occurred after 1656 with the invention of the pendulum clock. Galileo had the idea to use a swinging bob to regulate the motion of a time-telling device earlier in the 17th century. Christiaan Huygens, however, is usually credited as the inventor. He determined the mathematical formula that related pendulum length to time (about 99.4 cm or 39.1 inches for the one second movement) and had the first pendulum-driven clock made. The first model clock was built in 1657 in the Hague, but it was in England that the idea was taken up.[38] The longcase clock (also known as the grandfather clock) was created to house the pendulum and works by the English clockmaker William Clement in 1670 or 1671. It was also at this time that clock cases began to be made of wood and clock faces to utilize enamel as well as hand-painted ceramics.
In Europe, between 1280 and 1320, there is an increase in the number of references to clocks and horologes in church records, and this probably indicates that a new type of clock mechanism had been devised. Existing clock mechanisms that used water power were being adapted to take their driving power from falling weights. This power was controlled by some form of oscillating mechanism, probably derived from existing bell-ringing or alarm devices. This controlled release of power—the escapement—marks the beginning of the true mechanical clock, which differed from the previously mentioned cogwheel clocks. Verge escapement mechanism derived in the surge of true mechanical clocks, which didn't need any kind of fluid power, like water or mercury, to work.
Hopefully, you don’t have sensitive eyes. Get ready to have over 100 lumens pull up on you like the flashlight of a police officer on a Saturday night. One thing’s for sure—it’s going to wake you up, and keep you up. This is a nature sounds alarm clock to boot, so you’ll feel like you’re in the middle of the meadow when it goes off. A very bright meadow. NakaLight Wake Up will gradually light up a half hour before you awaken to ease you out of sleep.
The Howard Miller 613-229 Alcott offers an impressive pediment featuring a sculptured cove and enlarged dentil molding. An off-white Roman numeral dial features a solid brass bezel and decorative accents between the numerals. Hinged front door with latch. A polished and raised brass pendulum with grid and polished chime rods add a distinctive touch to the interior. Finished in Cherry Bordeaux on select hardwoods and veneers. German made Keinenger Key-wound, quarter hour Westminster chime movement with hour count. Chime silence lever and durable bronze bushings. One Year warranty and Free Shipping.
There’s nothing like seeing the time blasted on the wall in sharp red LED display. It gives you the perfect sense of, “Oh crap, I’m going to be late.” Projection alarm clocks are just plain awesome, and it’s especially true in this model. This isn’t just another electric alarm clock—you get advanced SelfSet technology thrown into this bad boy that’s going to correct the time and date for you, so the Daylight Savings Time ghost of Benjamin Franklin doesn’t haunt you.
This curvaceous wall clock features carved accents and a turned urn finial which complement the unique style. The aged dial offers black Roman numerals and decorative black hands. A special 80th Anniversary Edition. The wooden stick swinging pendulum features an antique-brass spun bob. Finished in Tuscany Cherry on select hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, dual chime movement plays switchable quarter hour 4/4 Westminster or Ave Maria chimes. Volume control and automatic nighttime chime shut-off option.

Designed to fit anywhere in your home, the Amazon Echo Spot uses voice recognition to let you see weather forecasts, read music lyrics, listen to Audible audiobooks, and more — and it’s all hands-free. Just ask Alexa to snooze the alarm. You can even ask Alexa to control the smart home devices in your house, including lights, locks, cameras, and thermostats. Need to make a phone call and don’t want to walk across the room to your phone? Ask the Spot to make phone calls or video calls to family and friends. As you can see, the Spot has much more in common with the Echo Dot than with a traditional alarm clock, although you’ll still get the time and a sleep mode. For more, read our full review.


A silent instrument missing such a striking mechanism has traditionally been known as a timepiece.[5] In general usage today, a "clock" refers to any device for measuring and displaying the time. Watches and other timepieces that can be carried on one's person are often distinguished from clocks.[6] Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century. During the 15th and 16th centuries, clockmaking flourished. The next development in accuracy occurred after 1656 with the invention of the pendulum clock. A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The electric clock was patented in 1840. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all.
"Stripe Clock" is a modern metallic design created by the artist, Belle. Measured at 24 inches on each side, this metal art is made from a single sheet of metal expertly grinded and tinted and made in to a functional clock. It is mainly characterized by the bright stripe in the middle of the sheet of metal. Each stroke and grind pattern on this piece accentuates the beauty of the plain sheet of metal. The glimmer coming from the shallow grinds are like street lights illuminating the city in the...
Electric clocks that are powered from the AC supply often use synchronous motors. The supply current alternates with a frequency of 50 hertz in many countries, and 60 hertz in others. The rotor of the motor rotates at a speed that is related to the alternation frequency. Appropriate gearing converts this rotation speed to the correct ones for the hands of the analog clock. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all. Time in these cases is measured in several ways, such as by the alternation of the AC supply, vibration of a tuning fork, the behaviour of quartz crystals, or the quantum vibrations of atoms. Electronic circuits divide these high-frequency oscillations to slower ones that drive the time display. Even mechanical clocks have since come to be largely powered by batteries, removing the need for winding.

Wall clocks both help you keep time and accent your space as decor that fills an empty wall space above the mantel or kitchen counter. For a clock that serves dual purposes, consider a numberless option—the minimalist look doesn't exude obvious functionality, but the time is still obvious and the clock works as a unique piece of hanging wall art—perfect for the living room or dining room. If you're not necessarily looking to make a bold style statement but still want a chic timepiece, embossed clocks fit the bill. The numbers add interest and dimension and keep the clock looking artful—another great option for the dining room or kitchen. For a family-friendly clock, look for large faces and clean-lined, easy-to-read numbering. With form and function in perfect accordance, this type also fits in beautifully on a bedroom wall. Don't forget about the home office, where time is of the essence. Minimalist designs in handsome walnut and sleek iron can add either a throwback or modern feel to the space. Wall clocks of all designs not only keep you, your family and your guests aware of the time, but also serve as great decorative elements to your home.
Though no longer our first pick of timepiece thanks to the smart phone, this old-fashioned clock still scores points for form. Measuring 6.25'' H x 2.5'' W x 5'' D, this compact clock’s face is encased in a metal case with a brushed nickel finish and convex glass lens, while its faded dial stays in step with vintage styling. This item is battery operated, but does not emit a loud ticking noise, so you can snooze to your heart's content.

This 24" large metal Large Wall Clock is finished in a dark rubbed bronze with aged bronze accents at the 3, 6, 9 and 12 positions. The aged dial features a subtle center pattern, aged black Roman numerals, black spade hour and minute hands and a convex glass crystal. A twisted metal ring frames the dial. Quartz, battery operated movement. One year warranty and Free Shipping.

Pairing a simple design with a contrasting black-and-silver palette, this eye-catching 12" wall clock instantly elevates your favorite aesthetic. Its round silhouette blends effortlessly into both casual or formal spaces, while its clean profile adds sophistication to your decor. Lean into this wall clock's versatility by adding it to a transitional living room arrangement alongside a mid-century-inspired sofa and gently-tufted barrel chairs for a cohesive seating space. Anchor the ensemble...
Wallingford's clock had a large astrolabe-type dial, showing the sun, the moon's age, phase, and node, a star map, and possibly the planets. In addition, it had a wheel of fortune and an indicator of the state of the tide at London Bridge. Bells rang every hour, the number of strokes indicating the time.[22] Dondi's clock was a seven-sided construction, 1 metre high, with dials showing the time of day, including minutes, the motions of all the known planets, an automatic calendar of fixed and movable feasts, and an eclipse prediction hand rotating once every 18 years.[23] It is not known how accurate or reliable these clocks would have been. They were probably adjusted manually every day to compensate for errors caused by wear and imprecise manufacture. Water clocks are sometimes still used today, and can be examined in places such as ancient castles and museums. The Salisbury Cathedral clock, built in 1386, is considered to be the world's oldest surviving mechanical clock that strikes the hours.[24]
“Great little dual alarm clock. Super easy to set the two alarms. Easy to use. It has a night light feature with adjustable dimmer, which is great. You can adjust the display completely dark so you don’t see the numbers. Then you can just hit the snooze button when the alarm is not ringing and the display lights up. It’s powered only by 3 AA batteries: no electric cord, no USB, nothing that you need. If you need a fancy alarm clock that sprays water in your face, this is not it.”
×