Special features beyond simply keeping time can be either practical or decorative. Often found in the kitchen or other busy room, some digital clocks can show readings of the indoor or outdoor temperature, display the date, and have the capacity to set an alarm or timer. A swinging pendulum is most commonly found on fancier wood and metal clocks, though some novelty styles also feature a pendulum.

Analog clocks usually use a clock face which indicates time using rotating pointers called "hands" on a fixed numbered dial or dials. The standard clock face, known universally throughout the world, has a short "hour hand" which indicates the hour on a circular dial of 12 hours, making two revolutions per day, and a longer "minute hand" which indicates the minutes in the current hour on the same dial, which is also divided into 60 minutes. It may also have a "second hand" which indicates the seconds in the current minute. The only other widely used clock face today is the 24 hour analog dial, because of the use of 24 hour time in military organizations and timetables. Before the modern clock face was standardized during the Industrial Revolution, many other face designs were used throughout the years, including dials divided into 6, 8, 10, and 24 hours. During the French Revolution the French government tried to introduce a 10-hour clock, as part of their decimal-based metric system of measurement, but it didn't catch on. An Italian 6 hour clock was developed in the 18th century, presumably to save power (a clock or watch striking 24 times uses more power).
Exuding vintage appeal, this striking oversize wall clock rounds out rustic ensembles or lends a timeworn touch to modern spaces. Encased in wrought iron, this design features a wood face bearing distressed details and roman numerals tied together by spade-style hands. One AA battery (not included) keeps this design keeping time. Measuring 32'' W x 32'' H x 1'' D, it's sure to grab glances no matter where it's placed.
"Very easy to use...Excellent Product...I cannot say enough about this clock -I love the fact mum is hearing my voice on a daily basis even though I live in another country....it's truly a great concept - great design and well worth it for elderly - for dementia patients or even for individuals who need a talking reminder about daily tasks or appts."
A brushed and polished brass finish gives this metal carriage alarm clock its enduring style. The decorative handle, turned brass button feet, and polished brass-tone columns at the corners add to the clock's stately presence. Beneath a glass crystal, the brushed brass-tone dial features circular, diamond-cut numeral ring, black Roman numerals, black hour and minute hands, and brass second and alarm hands.

Clocks have different ways of displaying time, connected to their internal clockwork type. Analog clocks usually indicate time using angles. Digital clocks display a numeric representation of time. Two numeric display formats are commonly used on digital clocks: 24-hour notation and 12-hour notation. Most digital clocks use electronic mechanisms and LCD, LED, or VFD displays. For convenience, distance, telephony or blindness, auditory clocks present the time as sounds. There are also clocks for the blind that have displays that can be read by using the sense of touch. Some of these are similar to normal analog displays, but are constructed so the hands can be felt without damaging them. The evolution of the technology of clocks continues today. The study of timekeeping is known as horology.
Early clock dials did not indicate minutes and seconds. A clock with a dial indicating minutes was illustrated in a 1475 manuscript by Paulus Almanus,[31] and some 15th-century clocks in Germany indicated minutes and seconds.[32] An early record of a seconds hand on a clock dates back to about 1560 on a clock now in the Fremersdorf collection.[33]:417–418[34]
The origin of the all-mechanical escapement clock is unknown; the first such devices may have been invented and used in monasteries to toll a bell that called the monks to prayers. The first mechanical clocks to which clear references exist were large, weight-driven machines fitted into towers and known today as turret clocks. These early devices struck only the hours and did not have hands or a dial.
Bring an earthy touch to your walls with this understated clock, a rustic accent for your space. Featuring a paneled distressed wood design with metal Roman numerals in a distressed gray finish, this clock brings a neutral touch to your look. Measuring at 27.5" x 27.5, this clock fits over any console or mantel space. Upkeep is easy—just wipe clean with a damp cloth—and install a AA battery (not included) to operate.
“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
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