This colorful tabletop clock is the perfect addition for any desk, table, or shelf! Crafted of plastic in a rich red finish, this clock showcases a round case with a silver bezel on a rectangular pedestal base measuring 5.5" H x 5.5" W x 2" D overall. The easy-to-read dial features black Arabic numerals over an off-white face, while a battery-operated movement keeps Art Deco-inspired hour, minute, and second hands in time. Rounding out the design, a programmable alarm gets you up in the morning.
Analog clocks usually use a clock face which indicates time using rotating pointers called "hands" on a fixed numbered dial or dials. The standard clock face, known universally throughout the world, has a short "hour hand" which indicates the hour on a circular dial of 12 hours, making two revolutions per day, and a longer "minute hand" which indicates the minutes in the current hour on the same dial, which is also divided into 60 minutes. It may also have a "second hand" which indicates the seconds in the current minute. The only other widely used clock face today is the 24 hour analog dial, because of the use of 24 hour time in military organizations and timetables. Before the modern clock face was standardized during the Industrial Revolution, many other face designs were used throughout the years, including dials divided into 6, 8, 10, and 24 hours. During the French Revolution the French government tried to introduce a 10-hour clock, as part of their decimal-based metric system of measurement, but it didn't catch on. An Italian 6 hour clock was developed in the 18th century, presumably to save power (a clock or watch striking 24 times uses more power).

In a clock driven by a weight or a spring, the power is first transmitted by the main, or great, wheel. This engages with a pinion (a gear with a small number of teeth designed to mesh with a larger wheel), whose arbor (a turning rod to which gears are attached) is attached to the second wheel that, in its turn, engages with the next pinion, and so on, down through the train to the escapement. The gear ratios are such that one arbor, usually the second or third, rotates once an hour and can be used to carry the minute hand. A simple 12-to-1 gearing, known as the motion work, gives the necessary step-down ratio to drive the hour hand. The spring or weight is fitted with a mechanism so it can be rewound when necessary, and the arbor carrying the minute hand is provided with a simple slipping clutch that allows the hands to be set to the correct time.
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A water-powered cogwheel clock was created in China in AD 725 by Yi Xing and Liang Lingzan. This is not considered an escapement mechanism clock as it was unidirectional, the Song dynasty polymath and genius Su Song (1020–1101) incorporated it into his monumental innovation of the astronomical clock-tower of Kaifeng in 1088.[19][page needed] His astronomical clock and rotating armillary sphere still relied on the use of either flowing water during the spring, summer, autumn seasons and liquid mercury during the freezing temperature of winter (i.e. hydraulics). A mercury clock, described in the Libros del saber, a Spanish work from 1277 consisting of translations and paraphrases of Arabic works, is sometimes quoted as evidence for Muslim knowledge of a mechanical clock. A mercury-powered cogwheel clock was created by Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi[20][21]
Electric clocks that are powered from the AC supply often use synchronous motors. The supply current alternates with a frequency of 50 hertz in many countries, and 60 hertz in others. The rotor of the motor rotates at a speed that is related to the alternation frequency. Appropriate gearing converts this rotation speed to the correct ones for the hands of the analog clock. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all. Time in these cases is measured in several ways, such as by the alternation of the AC supply, vibration of a tuning fork, the behaviour of quartz crystals, or the quantum vibrations of atoms. Electronic circuits divide these high-frequency oscillations to slower ones that drive the time display. Even mechanical clocks have since come to be largely powered by batteries, removing the need for winding.

The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]

If the only thing that will get you out the door in the morning is some serious nagging, Clockman is for you. This chatty clock refuses to shut up, even after you get out of bed. He'll greet you at your desired time, sing while you get dressed, and even yell if you anger him. While Clockman speaks only Japanese for now, his wake-up-and-get-going message isn't lost in translation.

Designed to fit anywhere in your home, the Amazon Echo Spot uses voice recognition to let you see weather forecasts, read music lyrics, listen to Audible audiobooks, and more — and it’s all hands-free. Just ask Alexa to snooze the alarm. You can even ask Alexa to control the smart home devices in your house, including lights, locks, cameras, and thermostats. Need to make a phone call and don’t want to walk across the room to your phone? Ask the Spot to make phone calls or video calls to family and friends. As you can see, the Spot has much more in common with the Echo Dot than with a traditional alarm clock, although you’ll still get the time and a sleep mode. For more, read our full review.


Analog clocks usually use a clock face which indicates time using rotating pointers called "hands" on a fixed numbered dial or dials. The standard clock face, known universally throughout the world, has a short "hour hand" which indicates the hour on a circular dial of 12 hours, making two revolutions per day, and a longer "minute hand" which indicates the minutes in the current hour on the same dial, which is also divided into 60 minutes. It may also have a "second hand" which indicates the seconds in the current minute. The only other widely used clock face today is the 24 hour analog dial, because of the use of 24 hour time in military organizations and timetables. Before the modern clock face was standardized during the Industrial Revolution, many other face designs were used throughout the years, including dials divided into 6, 8, 10, and 24 hours. During the French Revolution the French government tried to introduce a 10-hour clock, as part of their decimal-based metric system of measurement, but it didn't catch on. An Italian 6 hour clock was developed in the 18th century, presumably to save power (a clock or watch striking 24 times uses more power).
late 14c., clokke, originally "clock with bells," probably from Middle Dutch clocke (Dutch klok) "a clock," from Old North French cloque (Old French cloke, Modern French cloche), from Medieval Latin (7c.) clocca "bell," probably from Celtic (cf. Old Irish clocc, Welsh cloch, Manx clagg "a bell") and spread by Irish missionaries (unless the Celtic words are from Latin); ultimately of imitative origin.
The Howard Miller Braxton 625-628 Wall Clock is finished in Black Coffee on select hardwoods and veneers. The white dial features black Arabic numerals and minute track. The polished silver-tone bezel matches the brushed silver finished pendulum bob. The wooden pendulum stick matches the color of the case. The single chime quartz movement plays the Westminster chime on the hour and gives an hour count. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping. 

This alarm clock uses scent cartridges to wake you up to the smell of your favorite things, from bacon (!!!) to sweet peach. You can purchase any variety of cartridges you'd like (scents include bacon, cappuccino, mint, strawberry candy, banana, and sweet peach), but your initial purchase will come with one bacon capsule. Each cartridge contains 30 wake-ups.
In China, a striking clock was devised by the Buddhist monk and inventor Yi Xing (683–727).[5] The Chinese engineers Zhang Sixun and Su Song integrated striking clock mechanisms in astronomical clocks in the 10th and 11th centuries, respectively.[6] A striking clock outside of China was the water-powered clock tower near the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, Syria, which struck once every hour. It was constructed by the Arab engineer al-Kaysarani in 1154. In 1235, an early monumental water-powered alarm clock that "announced the appointed hours of prayer and the time both by day and by night" was completed in the entrance hall of the Mustansiriya Madrasah in Baghdad.[7]
This 24" large metal Large Wall Clock is finished in a dark rubbed bronze with aged bronze accents at the 3, 6, 9 and 12 positions. The aged dial features a subtle center pattern, aged black Roman numerals, black spade hour and minute hands and a convex glass crystal. A twisted metal ring frames the dial. Quartz, battery operated movement. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
Stay on schedule and charge a range of devices with this innovative iHome dual-alarm clock. Place your compatible smartphone on top of the Qi-certified device for swift wireless charging, or plug your phone into the clock’s handy powered USB port. This iHome dual-alarm clock incorporates NFC technology, so you can connect an array of Bluetooth-enabled devices with a quick touch.
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A wall clock is not only a household necessity, but can also be a stylish home accent piece. Features like analog roman numerals or digital displays can reflect a classic or high-tech style, an oversized silver metal clock can turn a wall into a decor feature, and a beautiful and ornate antique piece can lend a stately touch. Available in a wide variety of other designs and themes, choosing a wall clock to complement your decor can be easy and fun.
A clock accent and 9 metal gears make this vintaged wall decor a statement-making addition to any room. Hang it in the den for a rustic-chic focal point or add it to a cluster of canvas prints for a dynamic gallery display. Nothing adorns your living space like a lavish timepiece, and with the Chellis Wall Clock you are sure to receive a lot of compliments. Intricately designed, this clock is an eye-catching piece that will elevate the beauty of your decor manifold. A rustic and cutting-edge...

“This little beauty works great. I bought it when the alarm on my mobile phone began to intermittently fail me. This little travel clock is beautiful in retro seafoam green and great for travel because its bright color ensures that you will never miss picking it up from your hotel nightstand at checkout. There is a faint, pleasant ticking, the hands glow in the dark, and the nightlight button is bright when needed. The pop-up alarm button is firm and works well though I am learning not to accidentally press it and turn the alarm off when picking up the clock. Overall, a fantastic alarm clock.”
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