In mechanical clocks, the low Q of the balance wheel or pendulum oscillator made them very sensitive to the disturbing effect of the impulses of the escapement, so the escapement had a great effect on the accuracy of the clock, and many escapement designs were tried. The higher Q of resonators in electronic clocks makes them relatively insensitive to the disturbing effects of the drive power, so the driving oscillator circuit is a much less critical component.[2]


If the four alarms you scheduled to go off 10 minutes apart wake your neighbors but not you, you might want to try this noisy clock; it has a 113-decibel alarm—about as loud as a jackhammer. And if the volume alone won't do it, the red flashing lights and accompanying bed-shaker unit (which goes beneath your mattress) should deliver the full sensory message that grave danger awaits unless you get out of bed.

Use your wall space as the board to create your scalable clock. The Blink wall clock by Umbra is a set of black metal indicators and 12 number that mount to the wall with adhesives. Comes with a template to set the scale of the clock on a wall. Clock mechanism mounts to the wall with a screw or nail operate on one AA battery (not included). Designed by Edward Lee and Adrienna Matzeg Umbra original, modern, casual, functional and affordable design for the home.

The invention of the mechanical clock in the 13th century initiated a change in timekeeping methods from continuous processes, such as the motion of the gnomon's shadow on a sundial or the flow of liquid in a water clock, to periodic oscillatory processes, such as the swing of a pendulum or the vibration of a quartz crystal,[3][63] which had the potential for more accuracy. All modern clocks use oscillation.


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Showcasing the time, date, and weather, this clock is an essential for any desk. No need to lift your arm and look at your watch or light up your phone screen, this 0.3'' H x 3.7'' W x 1.5'' D design is an easy way to get the info you need. A vibrant blue backlight keeps it illuminated (requiring the power of a AA battery), while a plastic frame allows it to stand upright.
With the application of the synchronous electric motor to clocks in 1918, domestic electric clocks became popular. A synchronous electric motor runs in step with the frequency of the electric power source, which in most countries alternates at 60 hertz (cycles per second). The electric motor is coupled to a reduction gearing that drives the clock hands at the correct rate.
Never squint to see what time it is again, especially when you're waking up 20 times in the middle of the night to, you know, see exactly what time it is. We love the projection feature that displays the time on your wall or ceiling for easy viewing. Plus, it'll even toss up the temperature — so you'll already know what you should wear to work before you even get out of bed.

Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]
Sounds pretty self explanatory, right? You have to get up, position two thumbs on the bottom of the screen, and turn around according to the predesignated amount of spins. You’ll actually have to jerk yourself around, and by the end of it, you’ll look at the bed and say, “Well, I’m already up.” At least, that’s the hope of the app developers. This one comes in handy if paired with louder alarm clocks, as well.
Bring contemporary and clean-lined looks to your walls with this understated wall clock, this perfect mix of subtle, airy looks and midcentury modern aesthetics in your space. Featuring a simple rectangular metal frame finished in antique brass and distressed gray, this clock brings a warm look to your ensemble, while its elongated Roman numerals offer an updated twist on a classic look. To clean, simply wipe with a damp cloth.
“The alarm is loud with a lower frequency melody which I like since I have high-frequency hearing loss. Guaranteed to wake anyone up when the alarm goes off which is super important to me, especially if I’m using the alarm clock to wake up to catch a flight. … When the alarm goes off, press the large snooze bar on the top to have the alarm go off again in five minutes. Pressing the snooze bar on top at anytime also lights up the numbers and bars on the clock’s face, but the hands are a bit hard to see in the dark since the hands don’t light up. When the alarm on/off switch is turned to the off position, there’s a cute voice that says ‘Good Morning!’ which brings a smile to start the day. We love this clock so much, we plan to buy more to give as gifts. We’re sure the recipients will love it as much as we do.”
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