These mechanical clocks were intended for two main purposes: for signalling and notification (e.g. the timing of services and public events), and for modeling the solar system. The former purpose is administrative, the latter arises naturally given the scholarly interests in astronomy, science, astrology, and how these subjects integrated with the religious philosophy of the time. The astrolabe was used both by astronomers and astrologers, and it was natural to apply a clockwork drive to the rotating plate to produce a working model of the solar system.

Set multiple alarms, but not on the same device. The world started relying on their smartphones to wake them up, and it simply doesn’t work. Nothing is better than a good old fashion alarm clock. Here’s the trick: any device in your home that has an alarm feature, set it. That means your stove in the other room, the microwave, your alarm clock, your smartphone, and perhaps a stereo system (if anyone’s still using those). It’s one surefire way to ensure that you’ll freak out all the way to your feet.
Need a little extra incentive to pry yourself out of bed? You'll have plenty of it with this no-nonsense wheeled alarm clock. After the first time you press snooze, this unit automatically starts moving away from you, creating enough distance to literally force you out of bed in order to shut it off for good. Plus, it also comes in pastel blue, white, red, and more.

The Ruggie is made out of fleece and memory foam, which helps you ease into the cruel world that resides outside your duvet-adorned sanctuary. You can also set the device to play custom MP3s once you’ve applied pressure and silenced your alarm. Because, if anything, that stunning achievement deserves a theme song. If you like the idea of no snooze button, but you don’t think the Ruggie would work for you, then check out some of these other alarm clocks that force you to get out of bed.
The most accurate mechanical timekeeper is the Shortt pendulum clock; it makes use of the movement described above for electric master clock systems. The Shortt pendulum clock consists of two separate clocks, one of which synchronizes the other. The timekeeping element is a pendulum that swings freely, except that once every half minute it receives an impulse from a gently falling lever. This lever is released by an electrical signal transmitted from its slave clock. After the impulse has been sent, a synchronizing signal is transmitted back to the slave clock that ensures that the impulse to the free pendulum will be released exactly a half minute later than the previous impulse. The pendulum swings in a sealed box in which the air is kept at a constant, low pressure. Shortt clocks in observatories are kept in a room, usually a basement, where the temperature remains nearly constant, and under these conditions they can maintain the correct time to within a few thousandths of a second per day.
Special features beyond simply keeping time can be either practical or decorative. Often found in the kitchen or other busy room, some digital clocks can show readings of the indoor or outdoor temperature, display the date, and have the capacity to set an alarm or timer. A swinging pendulum is most commonly found on fancier wood and metal clocks, though some novelty styles also feature a pendulum.
A clock radio is an alarm clock and radio receiver integrated in one device. The clock may turn on the radio at a designated time to wake the user, and may also include a buzzer. Typically, they are placed on the bedside stand. Some models offer dual alarm and "snooze", a large button on the top that stops the alarm and sets it to ring again a few minutes later.[18] Some clock radios also have a "sleep" timer, which turns the music from radio on for a set amount of time (usually around one hour). This is useful for people who like to fall asleep with the radio on.
Until advances in the late twentieth century, navigation depended on the ability to measure latitude and longitude. Latitude can be determined through celestial navigation; the measurement of longitude requires accurate knowledge of time. This need was a major motivation for the development of accurate mechanical clocks. John Harrison created the first highly accurate marine chronometer in the mid-18th century. The Noon gun in Cape Town still fires an accurate signal to allow ships to check their chronometers. Many buildings near major ports used to have (some still do) a large ball mounted on a tower or mast arranged to drop at a pre-determined time, for the same purpose. While satellite navigation systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) require unprecedentedly accurate knowledge of time, this is supplied by equipment on the satellites; vehicles no longer need timekeeping equipment.
Strong, durable, super large time display makes the model perfect for those who either want a big number clock, or for visually impaired individuals who need extra-large numerals, The red LED display on a black background, makes the contrast ideal for easy viewing. The electric power with battery backup lets you sleep with peace of mind and the extra-large snooze bar keeps nap-time within reach. This clock is a solid purchase.

“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
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