The apparent position of the Sun in the sky moves over the course of each day, reflecting the rotation of the Earth. Shadows cast by stationary objects move correspondingly, so their positions can be used to indicate the time of day. A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a (usually) flat surface, which has markings that correspond to the hours.[7] Sundials can be horizontal, vertical, or in other orientations. Sundials were widely used in ancient times.[8] With the knowledge of latitude, a well-constructed sundial can measure local solar time with reasonable accuracy, within a minute or two. Sundials continued to be used to monitor the performance of clocks until the modern era.[citation needed]
Clocks aren't just for telling time! Take this one for example: artful with its understated analog dial, this piece is perfect lending an upscale feel to your living room look or kitchen ensemble. Measuring 16'' circular, its frame features a glass design accented by a shiny chrome center and openwork hands to mark the hour. This product required one AA battery to operate, which is not included. Suitable for indoor use only.
The Howard Miller Spokane 15.75" Wall Clock is a piece of classic design and features. This simple yet functional timepiece has a brushed aluminum finish. This round shape clock is very convenient and can be mounted on any wall of your home. This wall clock can be used for residential as well as commercial use as it has simple and subtle. This round wall clock from Spokane has a silver finished case with white background for ease at readability. This wall clock is numbered and features Arabic...
For some scientific work timing of the utmost accuracy is essential. It is also necessary to have a standard of the maximum accuracy against which working clocks can be calibrated. An ideal clock would give the time to unlimited accuracy, but this is not realisable. Many physical processes, in particular including some transitions between atomic energy levels, occur at exceedingly stable frequency; counting cycles of such a process can give a very accurate and consistent time—clocks which work this way are usually called atomic clocks. Such clocks are typically large, very expensive, require a controlled environment, and are far more accurate than required for most purposes; they are typically used in a standards laboratory.
Many alarm clocks have radio receivers that can be set to start playing at specified times, and are known as clock radios. Some alarm clocks can set multiple alarms, a useful feature for couples who have different waking up schedules. A progressive alarm clock, still new in the market, can have different alarms for different times (see Next-Generation Alarms) and even play music of your choice. Most modern televisions, mobile phones and digital watches have alarm clock functions to turn on or make sounds at a specific time.
Defined by its vintage silhouette, this round tabletop clock features two bells up above connected by a slender bridge. Its bold black numbers and classic pierced hands help you keep track of your day, while its alarm ensures you'll wake up on time to start your morning right. This metal design is offered in several bright shades with chipped accents that enhance its antique look. It requires one AA battery (not included).

“This was a gift for my elderly, cognitively impaired mother. She was very often confused as to which day it was, the time of day, etc. She would show up at appointments on the wrong day, or think it was morning when it was evening. This clock is fantastic! It has made such a difference. Now she always knows what day and time it is. The clock is also very nice-looking. This was an excellent purchase and highly recommended. I can’t say enough good things about it.”


A clock radio is an alarm clock and radio receiver integrated in one device. The clock may turn on the radio at a designated time to wake the user, and may also include a buzzer. Typically, they are placed on the bedside stand. Some models offer dual alarm and "snooze", a large button on the top that stops the alarm and sets it to ring again a few minutes later.[18] Some clock radios also have a "sleep" timer, which turns the music from radio on for a set amount of time (usually around one hour). This is useful for people who like to fall asleep with the radio on.
Not just a functional accent, this oversize wall clock brings pastoral style to any empty space in your abode. Crafted from wood and metal, it features a circular silhouette and cutout roman numerals as well as spade hands fixed atop a floral-inspired motif. Two AA batteries keep this design ticking and tocking, while a 36'' W x 36'' H x 1'' D frame is sure to grab glances in the entryway or over the living room seating group.

The Howard Miller Angelina 625-636 Wall Clock is part of Howard Millers New 91st Anniversary Edition of clocks. This clock has an aged look that is achieved through spatter marks, the use of a rasp, and well placed dents. The Antique White finish features brown undertones on select hardwood and veneers. The Angelina clocks that are made in 2017 will have the 91st Anniversary Edition inscription on the dial. The dial has an aged look with black Arabic numerals that look worn and charcoal grey hands behind a glass crystal that is convex. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping.


Now, RCA Digital Alarm Clock is pretty basic, but for some of us, that’s all we need, right? With a bright, beaming red LED display, you’re certain to rub your eyes and wonder what weird light is pulsating from your nightstand. There’s an alarm indicator and the classic AM/PM light that we all remember from early-2000 models. You can do something different from your late 1990s-inspired clock, and that is change the brightness levels so you don’t completely burn out your retinas.
This large farmhouse wall clock measures 36 inches This large farmhouse wall clock measures 36 inches across the face and features horizontal cedar wood slats a white distressed finish and hand painted black Roman numerals. Finish will vary slightly depending on each unique wood tone and grain pattern. The clock includes a high torque quartz movement antique-style spade ...  More + Product Details Close
Remember when the idea of chasing your alarm clock around the house was absolutely mad? Well, Clocky made it a reality, and they haven’t gone out of style yet. Bed shakers may work for some, but if you can ignore it and snooze on through, chasing your alarm clock around the room may be the next best thing. This mad machine can leap from three feet high, and if you’re trying to get some shut-eye on a Saturday, you can disable the wheels and make it stationary for the time being. Just don’t let that ruin your important meeting come 9:00 AM Monday morning. This little buzzer droid is going to make R2-D2 sounds while it zips around the room, egging you on to catch it.
Can we let you in on a secret? From pocket watches to grandfather clocks, a timepiece often tells as much about its owner as it does the hour. With a piece like this, you can ensure that it makes a statement in rustic-inspired style. Crafted from solid rubberwood with black metal spade handles, this piece is full of cottage charm. Featuring a distressed finish and roman numerals alongside its open back, this piece is sure to make welcome guests to your home with its modern farmhouse details.
As of the 2010s, atomic clocks are the most accurate clocks in existence. They are considerably more accurate than quartz clocks as they can be accurate to within a few seconds over thousands of years.[54] Atomic clocks were first theorized by Lord Kelvin in 1879.[55] In the 1930s the development of Magnetic resonance created practical method for doing this.[56] A prototype ammonia maser device was built in 1949 at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS, now NIST). Although it was less accurate than existing quartz clocks, it served to demonstrate the concept.[57][58][59] The first accurate atomic clock, a caesium standard based on a certain transition of the caesium-133 atom, was built by Louis Essen in 1955 at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK.[60] Calibration of the caesium standard atomic clock was carried out by the use of the astronomical time scale ephemeris time (ET).[61] As of 2013, the most stable atomic clocks are ytterbium clocks, which are stable to within less than two parts in 1 quintillion (2×10−18).[62]
“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
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