Certainly not just for telling time, wall clocks are perfect for adding artful appeal to your kitchen wall or acting as a focal point above the living room mantel. Take this one for example: a true traditional, its Roman numeral dial is accented by a world map detailing the face. Crafted from plastic, its frame offers more of a metal-inspired look with molded trim and a bronze finish. Requires one AA battery.
Mixing modern minimalism with industrial influence, this round 28" wall clock is as much a decorative accent as it is a practical timepiece. Crafted from metal, it showcases sizable Roman numerals and small spade-style hands to help you keep an eye on the hour. Its black and gold finish gives it an antiqued appearance, while its open design ensures it won’t overwhelm your arrangement. This piece requires two AA batteries (not included) to operate.
Electric clocks that are powered from the AC supply often use synchronous motors. The supply current alternates with a frequency of 50 hertz in many countries, and 60 hertz in others. The rotor of the motor rotates at a speed that is related to the alternation frequency. Appropriate gearing converts this rotation speed to the correct ones for the hands of the analog clock. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all. Time in these cases is measured in several ways, such as by the alternation of the AC supply, vibration of a tuning fork, the behaviour of quartz crystals, or the quantum vibrations of atoms. Electronic circuits divide these high-frequency oscillations to slower ones that drive the time display. Even mechanical clocks have since come to be largely powered by batteries, removing the need for winding.
A well-made large wall clock that looks good and runs smoothly can add charm and functionality to any space. For a fresh take on the traditional clock, consider this eye-catching design... Introducing Madera Wall Clock by Umbra This beautiful, modern clock has a wood veneer dial, aluminum bezel, and glass lens. Inspired by modern wristwatches Madera is intended to serve as a finishing touch for any space. Featuring a silent sweeping quartz mechanism, this wall clocks battery operated design...
Amazon buyers love it as well: with more than 4,600 reviews, the clock has an average of 4.4 stars. Not only do most buyers comment that it easily awakens them even though they are heavy sleepers, but several hearing-impaired buyers also mentioned that even without the sound, the vibration and flashing lights were enough to wake them up. One customer summed it up well, "If you can sleep through this, then you may not be alive."
If you’re looking for a way to add some pizazz to your walls as well as some function, wall clocks are a great design choice. You can find a wall clock in almost every shape, style and color. From modern wall clocks like the sunburst clock to antique wall clocks such as the pendulum clock, there’s a style for every room and every home. Some are even designed to fit into specific rooms: there are dozens of kitchen clocks featuring faces shaped like teapots, cows, bottles of milk and more. There’s even incentive to go big, as large wall clocks can become a statement piece in the same way a large mirror or work of art can.

Offer up eye-popping appeal on your walls with this absolutely striking wall clock, the perfect finishing touch to your factory-inspired ensemble. Fashioned from welded steel and featuring a deep black finish, this understated and chic clock lends a touch of simple style to your look, while its 45" diameter ensures it will make a big impact wherever you decide to hang it. Hang it up over trellis-print wallpaper in the living room to let the patterns show through this clock's openwork design, or...
Although it isn’t strictly an “alarm clock,” the Google Home Hub can wake you up in the morning and do so much more. One of the most drastic differences between the Home Hub and other comparable devices is its size; the Home Hub stands at a mere 4.5 inches tall. This makes it small enough to fit comfortably on a nightstand. That small frame is partly due to the lack of a camera, which may be a pro or a con depending on how much you value your privacy. The Home Hub connects to the various Bluetooth-enabled devices you might have throughout your home, including lights, speakers, thermostat, etc. You can set up the Home Hub to respond to your voice commands, or manage devices using the touchscreen. For the purposes of an alarm clock, the Home Hub works terrifically. You can set a normal alarm, or even have the Hub wake you with a specific song from your music library. Given the Hub’s lackluster built-in speakers, however, you may want to connect it to your sound system if you have one. For more details, read our full review.
Here is a clock that will look great in any room in the house and it never needs a plug! This Water Clock is powered by ordinary tap water. Never needs batteries or electricity. Just fill this Water clock with water and you are on your way to more eco-friendly home. After about 6 months to a year you may need to dump the water out (your can pour it into a plant) and refill. The clock will remember the time as you do so. It even has an alarm. Great for traveling as well. Why would you ever use...
Alarmclocksonline.com can also be a great place to find a gift for a loved one or a coworker. With our vast assortment of clocks, you can find the perfect gift for whomever it may be. Get your husband that new mp3 dock he's been hoping for, your coworker a nice digital clock to put on his desk, or grandma a new large faced alarm clock so that she can read it without difficulty. The options are endless.
Rise and shine, rebel. This Stormtrooper comes to you, bringing news of a peace proposal with the empire. See those bright numbers displayed brilliantly on its LCD screen? That means it's time to go. Adjustable arms point toward the door, beckoning for you to make haste. But before you head off to save the galaxy, you might want to turn your Lego alarm clock off first. Plus, if you're a Darth Vader fan, you can get this alarm clock with him, too!
Certainly not just for telling time, wall clocks are perfect for adding artful appeal to your kitchen wall or acting as a focal point above the living room mantel. Take this one for example: crafted from metal, its frame features an openwork design and a black finish for a look that fits right into traditional abodes and modern farmhouses alike. Measures about 30'' in diameter. Requires one AA battery to operate.
Need a little extra incentive to pry yourself out of bed? You'll have plenty of it with this no-nonsense wheeled alarm clock. After the first time you press snooze, this unit automatically starts moving away from you, creating enough distance to literally force you out of bed in order to shut it off for good. Plus, it also comes in pastel blue, white, red, and more.

Similar to our #8 selection, this app uses a gradual brightness increase to slowly wake you out of your sleep, before laying down the hammer and buzzing to wake you up. If you’re waking up angry or abruptly (more on this in a moment), then this is the perfect trick to keep ahead. Just ensure your alarm clock also has a USB charging slot to keep your phone nearby. This works well if you position it differently than your gradual light alarm clock, as if you’re getting two sunrises instead of one.

With it's quality construction and stylish mid-century modern design, the 31.5" Rumi Mid Century Wall Clock is an attractive accent for the home. Crafted entirely of iron, this large wall clock features a dark brown distressed finish and large distressed gold hands. Minimalism is reflected in the clock's open pass-through design. This clock is a must-have for anyone in search of mid-century modern inspired decor.
The Howard Miller Postema Oversized 49" Wall Clock is a unique piece that will remind you of oversized clocks. This round-shaped clock is a piece of style with the traditional accents. The clock has an espresso finish and round shape. You can mount this clock in any room at your home. This clock can also be placed in big halls or entryways because of its size and functionality. The clock has a distressed finish that complements the espresso varnish. This antique wall clock is made from wrought...
Over the past decade, many of us have gotten used to setting our alarm clocks on our smartphones rather than purchasing a dedicated device for our nightstands. Despite their seeming obsolescence, an array of cutting-edge clocks have hit the market to aid us with everything from falling asleep to promoting better sleep cycles. Even Amazon is in the alarm clock game, with the Echo Spot, a device that resembles a Magic 8 Ball and functions much like the Echo Show.
In mechanical clocks, the power source is typically either a weight suspended from a cord or chain wrapped around a pulley, sprocket or drum; or a spiral spring called a mainspring. Mechanical clocks must be wound periodically, usually by turning a knob or key or by pulling on the free end of the chain, to store energy in the weight or spring to keep the clock running.
Bring contemporary and clean-lined looks to your walls with this understated wall clock, this perfect mix of subtle, airy looks and midcentury modern aesthetics in your space. Featuring a simple rectangular metal frame finished in antique brass and distressed gray, this clock brings a warm look to your ensemble, while its elongated Roman numerals offer an updated twist on a classic look. To clean, simply wipe with a damp cloth.
A clock mechanism may be used to control a device according to time, e.g. a central heating system, a VCR, or a time bomb (see: digital counter). Such mechanisms are usually called timers. Clock mechanisms are also used to drive devices such as solar trackers and astronomical telescopes, which have to turn at accurately controlled speeds to counteract the rotation of the Earth.
A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The position of a ship at sea could be determined with reasonable accuracy if a navigator could refer to a clock that lost or gained less than about 10 seconds per day. This clock could not contain a pendulum, which would be virtually useless on a rocking ship. In 1714, the British government offered large financial rewards to the value of 20,000 pounds,[42] for anyone who could determine longitude accurately. John Harrison, who dedicated his life to improving the accuracy of his clocks, later received considerable sums under the Longitude Act.
The most accurate mechanical timekeeper is the Shortt pendulum clock; it makes use of the movement described above for electric master clock systems. The Shortt pendulum clock consists of two separate clocks, one of which synchronizes the other. The timekeeping element is a pendulum that swings freely, except that once every half minute it receives an impulse from a gently falling lever. This lever is released by an electrical signal transmitted from its slave clock. After the impulse has been sent, a synchronizing signal is transmitted back to the slave clock that ensures that the impulse to the free pendulum will be released exactly a half minute later than the previous impulse. The pendulum swings in a sealed box in which the air is kept at a constant, low pressure. Shortt clocks in observatories are kept in a room, usually a basement, where the temperature remains nearly constant, and under these conditions they can maintain the correct time to within a few thousandths of a second per day.
In mechanical clocks this is done mechanically by a gear train, known as the wheel train. The gear train also has a second function; to transmit mechanical power from the power source to run the oscillator. There is a friction coupling called the 'cannon pinion' between the gears driving the hands and the rest of the clock, allowing the hands to be turned to set the time.[73]

Electric clocks that are powered from the AC supply often use synchronous motors. The supply current alternates with a frequency of 50 hertz in many countries, and 60 hertz in others. The rotor of the motor rotates at a speed that is related to the alternation frequency. Appropriate gearing converts this rotation speed to the correct ones for the hands of the analog clock. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all. Time in these cases is measured in several ways, such as by the alternation of the AC supply, vibration of a tuning fork, the behaviour of quartz crystals, or the quantum vibrations of atoms. Electronic circuits divide these high-frequency oscillations to slower ones that drive the time display. Even mechanical clocks have since come to be largely powered by batteries, removing the need for winding.


Antique styling in a two-tone wall clock features a Worn Black finish with red undertones and a contrasting Antique Red inset panel. Beneath a convex glass crystal, the dial features an Antique Red background with gold Arabic numerals and aged brass-tone spade hands. The wood stick pendulum features a spun brass-finished bob. Finished in Worn Black on select materials, hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement.
Emerson alarm clock radio features relaxing sounds that help you unwind and fall asleep faster. Perfect for bedrooms, baby nurseries, spas, salons, apartments, offices and anywhere where unwanted disturbing or intrusive noise is a problem. The noise sound machine can help block out distractions and promote relaxation prior to sleep to provide you with a more peaceful, restful night sleep. Sounds include ocean side, rain, rain forest, summer night, tide and noise. With features such as a...
The primary purpose of a clock is to display the time. Clocks may also have the facility to make a loud alert signal at a specified time, typically to waken a sleeper at a preset time; they are referred to as alarm clocks. The alarm may start at a low volume and become louder, or have the facility to be switched off for a few minutes then resume. Alarm clocks with visible indicators are sometimes used to indicate to children too young to read the time that the time for sleep has finished; they are sometimes called training clocks.
In China, a striking clock was devised by the Buddhist monk and inventor Yi Xing (683–727).[5] The Chinese engineers Zhang Sixun and Su Song integrated striking clock mechanisms in astronomical clocks in the 10th and 11th centuries, respectively.[6] A striking clock outside of China was the water-powered clock tower near the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, Syria, which struck once every hour. It was constructed by the Arab engineer al-Kaysarani in 1154. In 1235, an early monumental water-powered alarm clock that "announced the appointed hours of prayer and the time both by day and by night" was completed in the entrance hall of the Mustansiriya Madrasah in Baghdad.[7]
Greek astronomer Andronicus of Cyrrhus supervised the construction of the Tower of the Winds in Athens in the 1st century B.C.[11] The Greek and Roman civilizations are credited for initially advancing water clock design to include complex gearing, which was connected to fanciful automata and also resulted in improved accuracy. These advances were passed on through Byzantium and Islamic times, eventually making their way back to Europe. Independently, the Chinese developed their own advanced water clocks(水鐘)in 725 A.D., passing their ideas on to Korea and Japan.
The oldest surviving clock in England is that at Salisbury Cathedral, which dates from 1386. A clock erected at Rouen, France, in 1389 is still extant, and one built for Wells Cathedral in England is preserved in the Science Museum in London. The Salisbury clock strikes the hours, and those of Rouen and Wells also have mechanisms for chiming at the quarter hour. These clocks are large, iron-framed structures driven by falling weights attached to a cord wrapped around a drum and regulated by a mechanism known as a verge (or crown wheel) escapement. Their errors probably were as large as a half hour per day. The first domestic clocks were smaller wall-mounted versions of these large public clocks. They appeared late in the 14th century, and few examples have survived; most of them, extremely austere in design, had no cases or means of protection from dust.
Certainly not just for telling time, wall clocks are perfect for adding artful appeal to your kitchen wall or acting as a focal point above the living room mantel. Take this one for example: a true traditional, its Roman numeral dial is accented by a world map detailing the face. Crafted from plastic, its frame offers more of a metal-inspired look with molded trim and a bronze finish. Requires one AA battery.
Howard Miller 625-613 Company Time II Large Wall Clock is a 34" wall clock with an antique nickel frame. The center dial is a bubbled panel that is heavily distressed and deeply dented for an aged appearance. The individual off-white number panels are curved and dented with Black Roman numerals centered on each panel. The accurate quartz movement requires one "AA" battery. Always measure your area to make sure the wall you have will accommodate this large of clock. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping.
The primary purpose of a clock is to display the time. Clocks may also have the facility to make a loud alert signal at a specified time, typically to waken a sleeper at a preset time; they are referred to as alarm clocks. The alarm may start at a low volume and become louder, or have the facility to be switched off for a few minutes then resume. Alarm clocks with visible indicators are sometimes used to indicate to children too young to read the time that the time for sleep has finished; they are sometimes called training clocks.

The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]
“The alarm is loud with a lower frequency melody which I like since I have high-frequency hearing loss. Guaranteed to wake anyone up when the alarm goes off which is super important to me, especially if I’m using the alarm clock to wake up to catch a flight. … When the alarm goes off, press the large snooze bar on the top to have the alarm go off again in five minutes. Pressing the snooze bar on top at anytime also lights up the numbers and bars on the clock’s face, but the hands are a bit hard to see in the dark since the hands don’t light up. When the alarm on/off switch is turned to the off position, there’s a cute voice that says ‘Good Morning!’ which brings a smile to start the day. We love this clock so much, we plan to buy more to give as gifts. We’re sure the recipients will love it as much as we do.”
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