The OK to Wake! alarm clock and nap timer is a useful tool for parents with young kids learning the importance of sleep schedules. When it's OK for a child to get out of bed (aka when the alarm or nap timer goes off) the clock will light up green, providing an easy-to-understand visual cue for little ones to start their day. It even has interchangeable face plates to suit aesthetic preferences.
In Europe, between 1280 and 1320, there is an increase in the number of references to clocks and horologes in church records, and this probably indicates that a new type of clock mechanism had been devised. Existing clock mechanisms that used water power were being adapted to take their driving power from falling weights. This power was controlled by some form of oscillating mechanism, probably derived from existing bell-ringing or alarm devices. This controlled release of power—the escapement—marks the beginning of the true mechanical clock, which differed from the previously mentioned cogwheel clocks. Verge escapement mechanism derived in the surge of true mechanical clocks, which didn't need any kind of fluid power, like water or mercury, to work.

Clocks have different ways of displaying time, connected to their internal clockwork type. Analog clocks usually indicate time using angles. Digital clocks display a numeric representation of time. Two numeric display formats are commonly used on digital clocks: 24-hour notation and 12-hour notation. Most digital clocks use electronic mechanisms and LCD, LED, or VFD displays. For convenience, distance, telephony or blindness, auditory clocks present the time as sounds. There are also clocks for the blind that have displays that can be read by using the sense of touch. Some of these are similar to normal analog displays, but are constructed so the hands can be felt without damaging them. The evolution of the technology of clocks continues today. The study of timekeeping is known as horology.
Exuding vintage appeal, this striking oversize wall clock rounds out rustic ensembles or lends a timeworn touch to modern spaces. Encased in wrought iron, this design features a wood face bearing distressed details and roman numerals tied together by spade-style hands. One AA battery (not included) keeps this design keeping time. Measuring 32'' W x 32'' H x 1'' D, it's sure to grab glances no matter where it's placed.
c. 1350–1400, Middle English clokke, clok, cloke, from Middle Dutch clocke (“bell, clock”), from Old Northern French cloque (“bell”), from Medieval Latin clocca, probably of Celtic origin, from Proto-Celtic *klokkos (“bell”) (compare Welsh cloch, Irish clog), from Proto-Indo-European *klēg-, *klōg-. Related to Old English clucge, Saterland Frisian Klokke (“bell; clock”), Low German Klock (“bell, clock”), German Glocke, Swedish klocka. Related to laugh.
Stay punctual with an alarm clock! They are great for waking you up in the morning or simply reminding you of special events. These items are a household must-have! Perfect for bedside nightstands, most alarm clocks feature a built-in FM radio to enjoy your favorite radio station, as well as a snooze button for when you need 5 to 10 minutes more sleep. iHome? clock radios have dock for MP3 players to listen to music through the speakers. Choose from a variety of unique, creative designs that are great for virtually any d‚cor.

The Howard Miller Clé Du Ville 625-579 Large Wall Clock is a 26.25" diameter oversize gallery wall clock features an antique dial within a wrought iron frame with an oil rubbed bronze finish. The aged parchment background includes names of well-known French cities faded in the background. Applied vintage antique key hour markers and spade hands finished in oil rubbed bronze complement the frame. Quartz battery-operated movement requires one AA battery. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
Bring home this table clock that showcases an antique-inspired look. Measuring 18'' H x 15'' W x 5'' D, it's the perfect piece to place on a bookshelf or desktop for a practical yet decorative accent. Made in a traditional, alarm-clock inspired style, it features a distressed gray metal frame and feet. Its face displays an off-white background and faded roman numerals, as well as an hour hand, minute hand, and ornamental gears in the center. It accommodates one AA battery to help keep you on...
This colorful tabletop clock is the perfect addition for any desk, table, or shelf! Crafted of plastic in a rich red finish, this clock showcases a round case with a silver bezel on a rectangular pedestal base measuring 5.5" H x 5.5" W x 2" D overall. The easy-to-read dial features black Arabic numerals over an off-white face, while a battery-operated movement keeps Art Deco-inspired hour, minute, and second hands in time. Rounding out the design, a programmable alarm gets you up in the morning.
In a master clock system, electricity is used to give direct impulses to the pendulum, which in turn causes the clock’s gear train to move, or to lift a lever after it has imparted an impulse to the pendulum. In various modern master clocks the pendulum operates a light count wheel that turns through the pitch of one tooth every double swing and is arranged to release a lever every half minute. This lever gives an impulse to the pendulum and is then restored to its original position by an electromagnet. The pulse of current that operates the electromagnet can also be transmitted to a series of distant dials, or slave clocks, advancing the hands of each through the space of a half minute. Thus, a master clock can control scores of dials in a large group of buildings, as well as such other apparatus as time recorders and sirens.
In a clock driven by a weight or a spring, the power is first transmitted by the main, or great, wheel. This engages with a pinion (a gear with a small number of teeth designed to mesh with a larger wheel), whose arbor (a turning rod to which gears are attached) is attached to the second wheel that, in its turn, engages with the next pinion, and so on, down through the train to the escapement. The gear ratios are such that one arbor, usually the second or third, rotates once an hour and can be used to carry the minute hand. A simple 12-to-1 gearing, known as the motion work, gives the necessary step-down ratio to drive the hour hand. The spring or weight is fitted with a mechanism so it can be rewound when necessary, and the arbor carrying the minute hand is provided with a simple slipping clutch that allows the hands to be set to the correct time.

During the 15th and 16th centuries, clockmaking flourished, particularly in the metalworking towns of Nuremberg and Augsburg, and in Blois, France. Some of the more basic table clocks have only one time-keeping hand, with the dial between the hour markers being divided into four equal parts making the clocks readable to the nearest 15 minutes. Other clocks were exhibitions of craftsmanship and skill, incorporating astronomical indicators and musical movements. The cross-beat escapement was invented in 1584 by Jost Bürgi, who also developed the remontoire. Bürgi's clocks were a great improvement in accuracy as they were correct to within a minute a day.[35][36] These clocks helped the 16th-century astronomer Tycho Brahe to observe astronomical events with much greater precision than before.[citation needed][how?]
Use of a Clock is optional. All key date-time classes also have a now() factory method that uses the system clock in the default time zone. The primary purpose of this abstraction is to allow alternate clocks to be plugged in as and when required. Applications use an object to obtain the current time rather than a static method. This can simplify testing.
“The alarm is loud with a lower frequency melody which I like since I have high-frequency hearing loss. Guaranteed to wake anyone up when the alarm goes off which is super important to me, especially if I’m using the alarm clock to wake up to catch a flight. … When the alarm goes off, press the large snooze bar on the top to have the alarm go off again in five minutes. Pressing the snooze bar on top at anytime also lights up the numbers and bars on the clock’s face, but the hands are a bit hard to see in the dark since the hands don’t light up. When the alarm on/off switch is turned to the off position, there’s a cute voice that says ‘Good Morning!’ which brings a smile to start the day. We love this clock so much, we plan to buy more to give as gifts. We’re sure the recipients will love it as much as we do.”
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