This farmhouse wall clock measures 30 in. across This farmhouse wall clock measures 30 in. across the face and features horizontal cedar wood slats a white distressed finish hand painted black Roman numerals in a Poster Condensed font and an inner accent ring with individual hour marks. It includes a high torque quartz movement antique-style spade hands and ...  More + Product Details Close

There’s a lot of science when it comes to sleeping, and there’s never a short supply of sleep-related tests going on. One of our favorite electronic brands here on Gear Hungry has made the most effective clock (in our humble opinion), and it’s the #8 pick: Philips Wake-Up HF3505. Slow light build mimics the sunrise, and gently pulls you out of a sleep-like trance before hitting you with some serious sound. Between price, effectiveness, and the fact that we didn’t have to chase it around the room (sorry Clocky, we’re not morning people), we absolutely loved this one.
For some scientific work timing of the utmost accuracy is essential. It is also necessary to have a standard of the maximum accuracy against which working clocks can be calibrated. An ideal clock would give the time to unlimited accuracy, but this is not realisable. Many physical processes, in particular including some transitions between atomic energy levels, occur at exceedingly stable frequency; counting cycles of such a process can give a very accurate and consistent time—clocks which work this way are usually called atomic clocks. Such clocks are typically large, very expensive, require a controlled environment, and are far more accurate than required for most purposes; they are typically used in a standards laboratory.
For light sleepers, audio alarms can be rather jarring. Fortunately, the Philips Morning Wake-Up Light uses a warm, gentle glow and natural sound effects rather than incessant beeping to get you out of bed. The alarm clock also features a colored sunrise simulation and 20 brightness settings for optimal customization. The light slowly increases in brightness between 20 and 40 minutes prior to your desired alarm time. The clock helps you drift to sleep, too. Instead of you simply turning out the lights and settling into bed, the light-responsive dimming feature gently guides you to sleep with audio accompaniment. This type of alarm is definitely not for everyone, but it is suitable for those who prefer to wake up gradually. For more details, read our full Philips Wake-Up Light review.
Keep time in style with this traditional tabletop clock, a great way to round out a decorative vignette while adding essential function. Crafted from wood and metal, this circular design sits atop a curved base and pairs an antique dial with a deep red finish. The glass-inlaid clock face sports glow-in-the-dark hands, so you can check the time in the wee hours and early evening, while a quartz movement keeps this design tickin’ and tockin’. Requires a battery.
Offer up eye-popping appeal on your walls with this absolutely striking wall clock, the perfect finishing touch to your factory-inspired ensemble. Fashioned from welded steel and featuring a deep black finish, this understated and chic clock lends a touch of simple style to your look, while its 45" diameter ensures it will make a big impact wherever you decide to hang it. Hang it up over trellis-print wallpaper in the living room to let the patterns show through this clock's openwork design, or...
The British had predominated in watch manufacture for much of the 17th and 18th centuries, but maintained a system of production that was geared towards high quality products for the elite.[44] Although there was an attempt to modernise clock manufacture with mass production techniques and the application of duplicating tools and machinery by the British Watch Company in 1843, it was in the United States that this system took off. In 1816, Eli Terry and some other Connecticut clockmakers developed a way of mass-producing clocks by using interchangeable parts.[45] Aaron Lufkin Dennison started a factory in 1851 in Massachusetts that also used interchangeable parts, and by 1861 was running a successful enterprise incorporated as the Waltham Watch Company.[46][47]

This isn’t for just any old sleeper. This is going to ensure that you get up with every bit of vigor in its little electronic body. Sonic Alert brings us a seriously powerful alarm clock that actually shakes the bed to get you out of it, and comes with a large red LCD screen. You’ll have red flashing in your eyes, the bed rumbling, and a loud sound as the light pulsates to get you up. The world isn’t ending, you’re just getting up for work again. Look alive, tiger!
Electric clocks that are powered from the AC supply often use synchronous motors. The supply current alternates with a frequency of 50 hertz in many countries, and 60 hertz in others. The rotor of the motor rotates at a speed that is related to the alternation frequency. Appropriate gearing converts this rotation speed to the correct ones for the hands of the analog clock. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all. Time in these cases is measured in several ways, such as by the alternation of the AC supply, vibration of a tuning fork, the behaviour of quartz crystals, or the quantum vibrations of atoms. Electronic circuits divide these high-frequency oscillations to slower ones that drive the time display. Even mechanical clocks have since come to be largely powered by batteries, removing the need for winding.

You know that feeling you get when you draw the blinds, and you didn’t expect it to be so sunny? That’s what this alarm clock does for you, except it wakes you up instead. Philips incorporated yellow-and-white light into this sunrise simulation programmable alarm clock, and this is the only alarm clock/lamp that’s certified to help you sleep better, and awake more refreshed than you ever thought possible. From America’s favorite retailer of small and budget-friendly gadgets, Philips does it again.
Bring elegant, antique style to your walls with this 23.25" wall clock. Crafted of manufactured wood and plastic, this clock’s dial showcases large Arabic numerals printed in weathered beige over the hand-painted royal red face. A battery-operated movement keeps spade hour and minute hands ticking away in time over the words “Hotel Westminster” and “Pairs Rue de la Paix” written in swirling cursive script. Distressed details and fleur-de-lis accents round out the design, imbuing a...

If you're outfitting your new home or apartment, check out more of our great buying guides like the best bar stools, the best light bulbs, the best coffee tables, the best area rugs, the best mattress toppers, the best sheets, the best mattresses, the best pillows, the best clothes hangers, the best cordless vacuum cleaners, the best laundry baskets and hampers, and the best home security cameras you can buy.
Water clocks, also known as clepsydrae (sg: clepsydra), along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments, with the only exceptions being the vertical gnomon and the day counting tally stick.[9] Given their great antiquity, where and when they first existed is not known and perhaps unknowable. The bowl-shaped outflow is the simplest form of a water clock and is known to have existed in Babylon and in Egypt around the 16th century BC. Other regions of the world, including India and China, also have early evidence of water clocks, but the earliest dates are less certain. Some authors, however, write about water clocks appearing as early as 4000 BC in these regions of the world.[10]
Set multiple alarms, but not on the same device. The world started relying on their smartphones to wake them up, and it simply doesn’t work. Nothing is better than a good old fashion alarm clock. Here’s the trick: any device in your home that has an alarm feature, set it. That means your stove in the other room, the microwave, your alarm clock, your smartphone, and perhaps a stereo system (if anyone’s still using those). It’s one surefire way to ensure that you’ll freak out all the way to your feet.

Here is a clock that will look great in any room in the house and it never needs a plug! This Water Clock is powered by ordinary tap water. Never needs batteries or electricity. Just fill this Water clock with water and you are on your way to more eco-friendly home. After about 6 months to a year you may need to dump the water out (your can pour it into a plant) and refill. The clock will remember the time as you do so. It even has an alarm. Great for traveling as well. Why would you ever use...


Go to bed with positive thoughts. Tell yourself, “I want to get up early because…” and then, actually do it. Sleep studies happen all the time, and they tell us what exterior activities are affecting our dreams, our nightmares, etc., and talking to yourself as you drift off to bed has been proven to work. If you’re looking forward to something in the morning, tell yourself about it, and your body will hold onto that through the night.
Showcasing the time, date, and weather, this clock is an essential for any desk. No need to lift your arm and look at your watch or light up your phone screen, this 0.3'' H x 3.7'' W x 1.5'' D design is an easy way to get the info you need. A vibrant blue backlight keeps it illuminated (requiring the power of a AA battery), while a plastic frame allows it to stand upright.

"Love it...Love it....Just a basic alarm clock needed one to check that my FM transmitter is on the correct frequency one that had a digital tuner fits the bill just fine and a battery back up clock for time announcements ....What can I say, it's a quality alarm, that never fails, and is not expensive Not once has this alarm failed to wake me up, Digits are bright and easy to see If I were to say something negative, The time is a little too fast (in a month you'll notice your like a minute or two ahead of the actual time, easy fix though) And the radio connection needs to better"


In China, a striking clock was devised by the Buddhist monk and inventor Yi Xing (683–727).[5] The Chinese engineers Zhang Sixun and Su Song integrated striking clock mechanisms in astronomical clocks in the 10th and 11th centuries, respectively.[6] A striking clock outside of China was the water-powered clock tower near the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, Syria, which struck once every hour. It was constructed by the Arab engineer al-Kaysarani in 1154. In 1235, an early monumental water-powered alarm clock that "announced the appointed hours of prayer and the time both by day and by night" was completed in the entrance hall of the Mustansiriya Madrasah in Baghdad.[7]
Most digital computers depend on an internal signal at constant frequency to synchronize processing; this is referred to as a clock signal. (A few research projects are developing CPUs based on asynchronous circuits.) Some equipment, including computers, also maintains time and date for use as required; this is referred to as time-of-day clock, and is distinct from the system clock signal, although possibly based on counting its cycles.

Here at the Strategist, we like to think of ourselves as crazy (in the good way) about the stuff we buy (like pillows), but as much as we’d like to, we can’t try everything. Which is why we have People’s Choice, in which we find the best-reviewed (that’s four-to-five-star reviews and lots of ‘em) products and single out the most convincing. While we’ve tried to find the nicest-sounding alarm clocks and ended up with picks for the best alarm clock and a voice-controlled alarm clock, we wanted to see what other ways to wake up were out there. So we found the best alarm clocks on Amazon, according to hyperenthusiastic reviewers. (Note that reviews have been edited for length and clarity.)
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