Get the reliability you need without sacrificing style. Get the reliability you need without sacrificing style. The Analog Quartz Mantel Alarm Clock from La Crosse Clock Co. is a traditional beeping alarm clock. It has the added bonus of luminous hands for easy nighttime viewing. The classic design features a black matted frame with black metal hands and ...  More + Product Details Close

This metal wire case wall clock is finished in antique black with antique gold highlights. The pendulum bob, with matching finish, is an open circle, suspended on a metal pendulum. A black bezel surrounds the convex acrylic crystal. The dial features an antique Antique Red background with gold Arabic numerals and Antique gold spade hands. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement. One Year Warranty.
Traditional led alarm clock models just don’t work for you? No problem. Blast your favorite mp3s or just have a crazy loud sound go off. You have to get up and actually step on this Instecho Carpet Alarm Clock to get it to stop, which is no problem.You’ll jump up, stomp on the mat, and be done with it—set it to play tunes for you afterwards (at a decent audio level) as a mini reward system. This mat gets up to 120 decibels (think as loud as two window unit air conditioners).
In the 13th century, Al-Jazari, an engineer from Mesopotamia (lived 1136–1206) who worked for Artuqid king of Diyar-Bakr, Nasir al-Din, made numerous clocks of all shapes and sizes. A book on his work described 50 mechanical devices in 6 categories, including water clocks. The most reputed clocks included the Elephant, Scribe and Castle clocks, all of which have been successfully reconstructed. As well as telling the time, these grand clocks were symbols of status, grandeur and wealth of the Urtuq State.[citation needed]

Who doesn't love an alarm clock that verbally lets you know it's time to get up and start your day? Step aside, Siri, because "Reminder Rosie" is where it's at. You can easily record up to 25 different alarm-reminders at 6 seconds each. So why not wake up to a recording of your kids saying, "Good morning, Mom!"? (Or maybe you don't want that.) We love how you can turn off the alarm by quickly pressing a button or just saying out loud, "Reminder Off." 
Many devices can be used to mark passage of time without respect to reference time (time of day, minutes, etc.) and can be useful for measuring duration or intervals. Examples of such duration timers are candle clocks, incense clocks and the hourglass. Both the candle clock and the incense clock work on the same principle wherein the consumption of resources is more or less constant allowing reasonably precise and repeatable estimates of time passages. In the hourglass, fine sand pouring through a tiny hole at a constant rate indicates an arbitrary, predetermined, passage of time. The resource is not consumed but re-used.
This Roman Numerals Vintage Wall Clock makes telling time easier on the eyes. The clock’s backing is made to look like aged barnwood. It has black metal framing and large Roman Numerals on its dial cut from the same black painted metal. Silver studs dot the frame wherever the numerals join it for a striking, yet simple, accent. The hands of the clock are metal too, telling the time with a minute and hour hand. This stunning Roman Numerals Vintage Wall Clock really strikes a chord for home...
The timekeeping part of all weight-driven clocks, including large tower clocks, is substantially the same. The figure shows the mechanism of a simple weight-driven timepiece with a pendulum. The frame is made up of two plates that carry the pivots of the various wheels and other moving parts and that are united and spaced by four pillars. The driving weight hangs from a line coiled around a barrel or sprocket, which is raised by turning the winding square or, in some cases, by pulling on the line. The main wheel engages with the centre pinion, on the arbor (axle) of which is also mounted the centre wheel. The front pivot of this wheel and pinion is lengthened to the right of the illustration; it carries the minute hand and part of the gearing necessary to drive the hour hand.
Whether you’re styling an accent wall or rounding out your decor, a retro-inspired wall clock like this one draws the eye while adding some utility to your ensemble. The large numbers make this clock easy to read, and with quartz movement, it features a more accurate reading. The minimalist black and white face and the sleek silver frame imbue it with contemporary appeal, making this piece easy to hang in a variety of design styles. Measures 15'' in diameter.
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This 77th Anniversary wall clock offers both substance and charm. Our most popular westminster wall clock with chimes and pendulum. The gently scalloped arched bonnet is supported by reeded columns with artfully turned caps. Behind the opening door, the off-white dial features black Arabic numerals, black serpentine hour and minute hands. A polished brass finished lyre and bezel provide the perfect accents to the warm wood case. Finished in Golden Oak on select hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, dual chime movement plays Westminster or Ave Maria chimes, and features volume control and automatic nighttime chime shut-off option.
In the 13th century, Al-Jazari, an engineer from Mesopotamia (lived 1136–1206) who worked for Artuqid king of Diyar-Bakr, Nasir al-Din, made numerous clocks of all shapes and sizes. A book on his work described 50 mechanical devices in 6 categories, including water clocks. The most reputed clocks included the Elephant, Scribe and Castle clocks, all of which have been successfully reconstructed. As well as telling the time, these grand clocks were symbols of status, grandeur and wealth of the Urtuq State.[citation needed]

A wall clock is not only a household necessity, but can also be a stylish home accent piece. Features like analog roman numerals or digital displays can reflect a classic or high-tech style, an oversized silver metal clock can turn a wall into a decor feature, and a beautiful and ornate antique piece can lend a stately touch. Available in a wide variety of other designs and themes, choosing a wall clock to complement your decor can be easy and fun.
Get up one minute earlier each and every day. We have biological clocks; it’s not just some weird term we use. Time doesn’t exist. I’m not going to get all existential on you and make you contemplate your place in the universe, because you already know what that is—being the version of you that gets up earlier. Your body needs time to adjust, and if you can wean into it like this, in a month, you’ll be waking up a half-hour early.
Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]

Here is a clock that will look great in any room in the house and it never needs a plug! This Water Clock is powered by ordinary tap water. Never needs batteries or electricity. Just fill this Water clock with water and you are on your way to more eco-friendly home. After about 6 months to a year you may need to dump the water out (your can pour it into a plant) and refill. The clock will remember the time as you do so. It even has an alarm. Great for traveling as well. Why would you ever use...


This selection offers an analog display with hands and a built-in digital wall clock. Metallic gray wall clock with a flat bezel framing the dial. White dial with large black Arabic numerals, black hour, minute and second hands beneath a glass crystal. LCD calendar in the dial displays the month, date, and day of the week. Quartz, battery operated movement.
The British had predominated in watch manufacture for much of the 17th and 18th centuries, but maintained a system of production that was geared towards high quality products for the elite.[44] Although there was an attempt to modernise clock manufacture with mass production techniques and the application of duplicating tools and machinery by the British Watch Company in 1843, it was in the United States that this system took off. In 1816, Eli Terry and some other Connecticut clockmakers developed a way of mass-producing clocks by using interchangeable parts.[45] Aaron Lufkin Dennison started a factory in 1851 in Massachusetts that also used interchangeable parts, and by 1861 was running a successful enterprise incorporated as the Waltham Watch Company.[46][47]
The word horologia (from the Greek ὥρα, hour, and λέγειν, to tell) was used to describe early mechanical clocks,[15] but the use of this word (still used in several Romance languages) [16] for all timekeepers conceals the true nature of the mechanisms. For example, there is a record that in 1176 Sens Cathedral installed a ‘horologe’[17] but the mechanism used is unknown. According to Jocelin of Brakelond, in 1198 during a fire at the abbey of St Edmundsbury (now Bury St Edmunds), the monks 'ran to the clock' to fetch water, indicating that their water clock had a reservoir large enough to help extinguish the occasional fire.[18] The word clock (from the Celtic words clocca and clogan, both meaning "bell"), which gradually supersedes "horologe", suggests that it was the sound of bells which also characterized the prototype mechanical clocks that appeared during the 13th century in Europe.
The Howard Miller Clé Du Ville 625-579 Large Wall Clock is a 26.25" diameter oversize gallery wall clock features an antique dial within a wrought iron frame with an oil rubbed bronze finish. The aged parchment background includes names of well-known French cities faded in the background. Applied vintage antique key hour markers and spade hands finished in oil rubbed bronze complement the frame. Quartz battery-operated movement requires one AA battery. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
The Howard Miller Braxton 625-628 Wall Clock is finished in Black Coffee on select hardwoods and veneers. The white dial features black Arabic numerals and minute track. The polished silver-tone bezel matches the brushed silver finished pendulum bob. The wooden pendulum stick matches the color of the case. The single chime quartz movement plays the Westminster chime on the hour and gives an hour count. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping.
Get up one minute earlier each and every day. We have biological clocks; it’s not just some weird term we use. Time doesn’t exist. I’m not going to get all existential on you and make you contemplate your place in the universe, because you already know what that is—being the version of you that gets up earlier. Your body needs time to adjust, and if you can wean into it like this, in a month, you’ll be waking up a half-hour early.
In mechanical clocks, the power source is typically either a weight suspended from a cord or chain wrapped around a pulley, sprocket or drum; or a spiral spring called a mainspring. Mechanical clocks must be wound periodically, usually by turning a knob or key or by pulling on the free end of the chain, to store energy in the weight or spring to keep the clock running.
About 1450, clockmakers working probably in southern Germany or northern Italy began to make small clocks driven by a spring. These were the first portable timepieces, representing an important landmark in horology. The time-telling dials of these clocks usually had an hour hand only (minute hands did not generally appear until the 1650s) and were exposed to the air; there was normally no form of cover such as a glass until the 17th century, though the mechanism was enclosed, and the cases were made of brass.
“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
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