Bring contemporary and clean-lined looks to your walls with this understated wall clock, this perfect mix of subtle, airy looks and midcentury modern aesthetics in your space. Featuring a simple rectangular metal frame finished in antique brass and distressed gray, this clock brings a warm look to your ensemble, while its elongated Roman numerals offer an updated twist on a classic look. To clean, simply wipe with a damp cloth.
The Howard Miller Angelina 625-636 Wall Clock is part of Howard Millers New 91st Anniversary Edition of clocks. This clock has an aged look that is achieved through spatter marks, the use of a rasp, and well placed dents. The Antique White finish features brown undertones on select hardwood and veneers. The Angelina clocks that are made in 2017 will have the 91st Anniversary Edition inscription on the dial. The dial has an aged look with black Arabic numerals that look worn and charcoal grey hands behind a glass crystal that is convex. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping.
Howard Miller 625-323 Alton wall clock. Matte black case with shatter-resistant acrylic crystal. White dial and large, easy-to-read black Arabic numerals. Auto Daylight-Savings movement automatically adjusts for Daylight Savings Time. The hands of the clock follow an LCD display on the back of the clock and make corrections to keep the correct time including Daylight Saving Time corrections.
Over the past decade, many of us have gotten used to setting our alarm clocks on our smartphones rather than purchasing a dedicated device for our nightstands. Despite their seeming obsolescence, an array of cutting-edge clocks have hit the market to aid us with everything from falling asleep to promoting better sleep cycles. Even Amazon is in the alarm clock game, with the Echo Spot, a device that resembles a Magic 8 Ball and functions much like the Echo Show.
About 1581 Galileo noticed the characteristic timekeeping property of the pendulum. The Dutch astronomer and physicist Christiaan Huygens was responsible for the practical application of the pendulum as a time controller in clocks from 1656 onward. Huygens’s invention brought about a great increase in the importance and extent of clock making. Clocks, weight-driven and with short pendulums, were encased in wood and made to hang on the wall, but these new eight-day wall clocks had very heavy weights, and many fell off weak plaster walls and were destroyed. The next step was to extend the case to the floor, and the grandfather clock was born. In 1670 the long, or seconds, pendulum was introduced by English clock makers with the anchor escapement.
Go to bed with positive thoughts. Tell yourself, “I want to get up early because…” and then, actually do it. Sleep studies happen all the time, and they tell us what exterior activities are affecting our dreams, our nightmares, etc., and talking to yourself as you drift off to bed has been proven to work. If you’re looking forward to something in the morning, tell yourself about it, and your body will hold onto that through the night.

Pairing a simple design with a contrasting black-and-silver palette, this eye-catching 12" wall clock instantly elevates your favorite aesthetic. Its round silhouette blends effortlessly into both casual or formal spaces, while its clean profile adds sophistication to your decor. Lean into this wall clock's versatility by adding it to a transitional living room arrangement alongside a mid-century-inspired sofa and gently-tufted barrel chairs for a cohesive seating space. Anchor the ensemble...

More than just a time teller, oversized wall clocks create an eye-catching centerpiece in any ensemble while helping define your space’s aesthetic. Take this one for example: made from iron, it’s the perfect pick for any modern farmhouse-inspired decor. It strikes a circular silhouette and has an open and airy feel. Roman numeral accents line the periphery while two spade hands keep tabs on the time. It measures 30'' W x 30'' H x 1'' D and is operated by AA batteries.
Sounds like a Marvel villain if you say it out loud, doesn’t it? Sonic Alert Vibrating Skull Crusher Clock has a bit of edge to it, and like your metal days, it’s going to wake you up with a thunderous roar. You get 113 decibels of noise, which is basically like a crappy $20.00 blender whizzing right next to your head. Hook up your phone or MP3 player to rock out to your tunes in the morning, should you dare. You get a five-dimmer setting for the red LED display, and the 12-volt bone crusher bed shaker, just to make sure you’re really awake in the morning.
Go to bed with positive thoughts. Tell yourself, “I want to get up early because…” and then, actually do it. Sleep studies happen all the time, and they tell us what exterior activities are affecting our dreams, our nightmares, etc., and talking to yourself as you drift off to bed has been proven to work. If you’re looking forward to something in the morning, tell yourself about it, and your body will hold onto that through the night.

By the time that phone hits the nightstand, you've lost precious sleep time, you've tricked your brain into thinking it's wake-up time instead of dream time, because the glow of the blue light emitted by your phone reduces your body's release of melatonin, the hormone that regulates your sleep cycle. Instead of relaxing, you've stimulated your mind. All of that adds up to poor quality sleep followed by a groggy, foggy, "I don't know why I'm so tired," kind of morning.
The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–348 BC) was said to possess a large water clock with an unspecified alarm signal similar to the sound of a water organ; he used it at night, possibly for signaling the beginning of his lectures at dawn (Athenaeus 4.174c).[2] The Hellenistic engineer and inventor Ctesibius (fl. 285–222 BC) fitted his clepsydras with dial and pointer for indicating the time, and added elaborate "alarm systems, which could be made to drop pebbles on a gong, or blow trumpets (by forcing bell-jars down into water and taking the compressed air through a beating reed) at pre-set times" (Vitruv 11.11).[3]

This 33" metal wall clock features an antique nickel-finished frame is 7" wide and curves down from the face to the wall hiding the almost 3" in depth. The frame also features 100 decorative nail heads in two rows one on the inside of the frame and one on the outside of the frame.The accurate Quartz movement is operated by one AA battery. One year warranty and Free Shipping.


Offer up eye-popping appeal on your walls with this absolutely striking wall clock, the perfect finishing touch to your factory-inspired ensemble. Fashioned from welded steel and featuring a deep black finish, this understated and chic clock lends a touch of simple style to your look, while its 45" diameter ensures it will make a big impact wherever you decide to hang it. Hang it up over trellis-print wallpaper in the living room to let the patterns show through this clock's openwork design, or...
This alarm clock uses scent cartridges to wake you up to the smell of your favorite things, from bacon (!!!) to sweet peach. You can purchase any variety of cartridges you'd like (scents include bacon, cappuccino, mint, strawberry candy, banana, and sweet peach), but your initial purchase will come with one bacon capsule. Each cartridge contains 30 wake-ups.

If the only thing that will get you out the door in the morning is some serious nagging, Clockman is for you. This chatty clock refuses to shut up, even after you get out of bed. He'll greet you at your desired time, sing while you get dressed, and even yell if you anger him. While Clockman speaks only Japanese for now, his wake-up-and-get-going message isn't lost in translation.
With this collection's award-winning and patented Smart Set technology, the flashing "12:00" display is a thing of the past. The digital tuning clock radio automatically sets itself on the first use to the correct year, month, date, day, and time. The clock radio features a large and easy-to-read LED display. The alarm can be programmed to operate on weekdays only, weekends only, or all seven days of the week. The alarm displays the month and date with the touch of a button. Set the alarm to...
Bring elegant, antique style to your walls with this 23.25" wall clock. Crafted of manufactured wood and plastic, this clock’s dial showcases large Arabic numerals printed in weathered beige over the hand-painted royal red face. A battery-operated movement keeps spade hour and minute hands ticking away in time over the words “Hotel Westminster” and “Pairs Rue de la Paix” written in swirling cursive script. Distressed details and fleur-de-lis accents round out the design, imbuing a...

Water clocks, also known as clepsydrae (sg: clepsydra), along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments, with the only exceptions being the vertical gnomon and the day counting tally stick.[9] Given their great antiquity, where and when they first existed is not known and perhaps unknowable. The bowl-shaped outflow is the simplest form of a water clock and is known to have existed in Babylon and in Egypt around the 16th century BC. Other regions of the world, including India and China, also have early evidence of water clocks, but the earliest dates are less certain. Some authors, however, write about water clocks appearing as early as 4000 BC in these regions of the world.[10]
A captivating timepiece, this 29-inch wall clock stylishly pays homage to French country style with elegance. Especially fitting for an empty wall space, this wooden piece effortlessly draws the eye with its bold Roman numerals and matching clock hands that hover over a pale aqua and ivory-colored face. Its fleur-de-lis and floral details are a harmonious match for a romantic and feminine aesthetic in the living room, which is easily complemented by other weathered décor and Parisian...
The glossy finish reflects just enough light to show off the clock’s clean lines and rounded edges, and individuals who prefer a little bit of background ambiance throughout the night will enjoy the gentle ticking. The clock is also ultra-compact, so it won’t crowd your nightstand. The off button located on the top quickly silences the old-school beeping, too, but unfortunately, the device lacks a snooze button.
Scientific studies on sleep having shown that sleep stage at awakening is an important factor in amplifying sleep inertia. Alarm clocks involving sleep stage monitoring appeared on the market in 2005.[22] The alarm clocks use sensing technologies such as EEG electrodes and accelerometers to wake people from sleep.[23][24]Dawn simulators are another technology meant to mediate these effects.[25]
In Europe, between 1280 and 1320, there is an increase in the number of references to clocks and horologes in church records, and this probably indicates that a new type of clock mechanism had been devised. Existing clock mechanisms that used water power were being adapted to take their driving power from falling weights. This power was controlled by some form of oscillating mechanism, probably derived from existing bell-ringing or alarm devices. This controlled release of power—the escapement—marks the beginning of the true mechanical clock, which differed from the previously mentioned cogwheel clocks. Verge escapement mechanism derived in the surge of true mechanical clocks, which didn't need any kind of fluid power, like water or mercury, to work.
This 33" metal wall clock features an antique nickel-finished frame is 7" wide and curves down from the face to the wall hiding the almost 3" in depth. The frame also features 100 decorative nail heads in two rows one on the inside of the frame and one on the outside of the frame.The accurate Quartz movement is operated by one AA battery. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
A. Many modern alarm clocks are designed to stimulate the natural wake and sleep cycle of the body. Clocks with sunlight simulation help give the body visual cues that it’s time to wake up. Clocks with progressive alarms provide gentle auditory cues. When the body has a chance to wake slowly, it can better prepare for the day, which may help you you feel more rested.
About 1450, clockmakers working probably in southern Germany or northern Italy began to make small clocks driven by a spring. These were the first portable timepieces, representing an important landmark in horology. The time-telling dials of these clocks usually had an hour hand only (minute hands did not generally appear until the 1650s) and were exposed to the air; there was normally no form of cover such as a glass until the 17th century, though the mechanism was enclosed, and the cases were made of brass.

Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century,[25][26][27] although they are often erroneously credited to Nuremberg watchmaker Peter Henlein (or Henle, or Hele) around 1511.[28][29][30] The earliest existing spring driven clock is the chamber clock given to Phillip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, around 1430, now in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum.[4] Spring power presented clockmakers with a new problem: how to keep the clock movement running at a constant rate as the spring ran down. This resulted in the invention of the stackfreed and the fusee in the 15th century, and many other innovations, down to the invention of the modern going barrel in 1760.

There’s a lot of science when it comes to sleeping, and there’s never a short supply of sleep-related tests going on. One of our favorite electronic brands here on Gear Hungry has made the most effective clock (in our humble opinion), and it’s the #8 pick: Philips Wake-Up HF3505. Slow light build mimics the sunrise, and gently pulls you out of a sleep-like trance before hitting you with some serious sound. Between price, effectiveness, and the fact that we didn’t have to chase it around the room (sorry Clocky, we’re not morning people), we absolutely loved this one.
Now this is an alarm clock for the heaviest sleeper. If you're the type who sleeps through anything — thunderstorms, loud neighbors, earthquakes, the zombie apocalypse — you've finally met your match. Sonic Alert's Sonic Bomb Alarm Clock doesn't just rely on its 113-decibel alarm to pry your eyelids open (for comparison, that's about the same decibel level as a car horn or snow blower going off in your ear), it also has a shaker device that slips underneath your mattress or pillow to jiggle you awake, and red flashing lights that trigger with the alarm.
A water-powered cogwheel clock was created in China in AD 725 by Yi Xing and Liang Lingzan. This is not considered an escapement mechanism clock as it was unidirectional, the Song dynasty polymath and genius Su Song (1020–1101) incorporated it into his monumental innovation of the astronomical clock-tower of Kaifeng in 1088.[19][page needed] His astronomical clock and rotating armillary sphere still relied on the use of either flowing water during the spring, summer, autumn seasons and liquid mercury during the freezing temperature of winter (i.e. hydraulics). A mercury clock, described in the Libros del saber, a Spanish work from 1277 consisting of translations and paraphrases of Arabic works, is sometimes quoted as evidence for Muslim knowledge of a mechanical clock. A mercury-powered cogwheel clock was created by Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi[20][21]
A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The position of a ship at sea could be determined with reasonable accuracy if a navigator could refer to a clock that lost or gained less than about 10 seconds per day. This clock could not contain a pendulum, which would be virtually useless on a rocking ship. In 1714, the British government offered large financial rewards to the value of 20,000 pounds,[42] for anyone who could determine longitude accurately. John Harrison, who dedicated his life to improving the accuracy of his clocks, later received considerable sums under the Longitude Act.
Slave clocks, used in large institutions and schools from the 1860s to the 1970s, kept time with a pendulum, but were wired to a master clock in the building, and periodically received a signal to synchronize them with the master, often on the hour.[71] Later versions without pendulums were triggered by a pulse from the master clock and certain sequences used to force rapid synchronization following a power failure.
In a master clock system, electricity is used to give direct impulses to the pendulum, which in turn causes the clock’s gear train to move, or to lift a lever after it has imparted an impulse to the pendulum. In various modern master clocks the pendulum operates a light count wheel that turns through the pitch of one tooth every double swing and is arranged to release a lever every half minute. This lever gives an impulse to the pendulum and is then restored to its original position by an electromagnet. The pulse of current that operates the electromagnet can also be transmitted to a series of distant dials, or slave clocks, advancing the hands of each through the space of a half minute. Thus, a master clock can control scores of dials in a large group of buildings, as well as such other apparatus as time recorders and sirens.
Howard Miller 625-323 Alton wall clock. Matte black case with shatter-resistant acrylic crystal. White dial and large, easy-to-read black Arabic numerals. Auto Daylight-Savings movement automatically adjusts for Daylight Savings Time. The hands of the clock follow an LCD display on the back of the clock and make corrections to keep the correct time including Daylight Saving Time corrections.

A vintaged take on traditional style, this alarm clock brings time-honored style to any space, without breaking the bank. Crafted from metal, this analog alarm clock showcasing a round face sitting atop a molded base. Giving this piece a distinctive look is an antiqued face, outfitted with glow-in-the-dark hour and minute hands. Black and neutral hues round out this clock's color palette, accented with distressed details. Measured at under half-a-foot tall and wide, this lightweight clock is...

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