About 1450, clockmakers working probably in southern Germany or northern Italy began to make small clocks driven by a spring. These were the first portable timepieces, representing an important landmark in horology. The time-telling dials of these clocks usually had an hour hand only (minute hands did not generally appear until the 1650s) and were exposed to the air; there was normally no form of cover such as a glass until the 17th century, though the mechanism was enclosed, and the cases were made of brass.

Electric currents can be used to replace the weight or spring as a source of power and as a means of signaling time indications from a central master clock to a wide range of distant indicating dials. Invented in 1840, the first battery electric clock was driven by a spring and pendulum and employed an electrical impulse to operate a number of dials. Considerable experimental work followed, and it was not until 1906 that the first self-contained battery-driven clock was invented.
In 1735, Harrison built his first chronometer, which he steadily improved on over the next thirty years before submitting it for examination. The clock had many innovations, including the use of bearings to reduce friction, weighted balances to compensate for the ship's pitch and roll in the sea and the use of two different metals to reduce the problem of expansion from heat. The chronometer was tested in 1761 by Harrison's son and by the end of 10 weeks the clock was in error by less than 5 seconds.[43]

In the modern day and age, clocks are everywhere, from your phone to your computer or even on your wrist as a fashion item. A modern clock can be used for more than just telling time, a wall clock makes for a great design piece for your home. There are contrasting types of clocks ranging from analog to oversized, and they come in an assortment of shapes and material as well. Clocks are interesting wall decorations because they are constantly looked at to figure out the time, which makes finding a wall clock that fits your style that much more important.
If the only thing that will get you out the door in the morning is some serious nagging, Clockman is for you. This chatty clock refuses to shut up, even after you get out of bed. He'll greet you at your desired time, sing while you get dressed, and even yell if you anger him. While Clockman speaks only Japanese for now, his wake-up-and-get-going message isn't lost in translation.
In the 13th century, Al-Jazari, an engineer from Mesopotamia (lived 1136–1206) who worked for Artuqid king of Diyar-Bakr, Nasir al-Din, made numerous clocks of all shapes and sizes. A book on his work described 50 mechanical devices in 6 categories, including water clocks. The most reputed clocks included the Elephant, Scribe and Castle clocks, all of which have been successfully reconstructed. As well as telling the time, these grand clocks were symbols of status, grandeur and wealth of the Urtuq State.[citation needed]
Most digital clocks use electronic mechanisms and LCD, LED, or VFD displays; many other display technologies are used as well (cathode ray tubes, nixie tubes, etc.). After a reset, battery change or power failure, these clocks without a backup battery or capacitor either start counting from 12:00, or stay at 12:00, often with blinking digits indicating that the time needs to be set. Some newer clocks will reset themselves based on radio or Internet time servers that are tuned to national atomic clocks. Since the advent of digital clocks in the 1960s, the use of analog clocks has declined significantly.

Some clocks, called 'flip clocks', have digital displays that work mechanically. The digits are painted on sheets of material which are mounted like the pages of a book. Once a minute, a page is turned over to reveal the next digit. These displays are usually easier to read in brightly lit conditions than LCDs or LEDs. Also, they do not go back to 12:00 after a power interruption. Flip clocks generally do not have electronic mechanisms. Usually, they are driven by AC-synchronous motors.
This isn’t for just any old sleeper. This is going to ensure that you get up with every bit of vigor in its little electronic body. Sonic Alert brings us a seriously powerful alarm clock that actually shakes the bed to get you out of it, and comes with a large red LCD screen. You’ll have red flashing in your eyes, the bed rumbling, and a loud sound as the light pulsates to get you up. The world isn’t ending, you’re just getting up for work again. Look alive, tiger!

Some water clock designs were developed independently and some knowledge was transferred through the spread of trade. Pre-modern societies do not have the same precise timekeeping requirements that exist in modern industrial societies, where every hour of work or rest is monitored, and work may start or finish at any time regardless of external conditions. Instead, water clocks in ancient societies were used mainly for astrological reasons. These early water clocks were calibrated with a sundial. While never reaching the level of accuracy of a modern timepiece, the water clock was the most accurate and commonly used timekeeping device for millennia, until it was replaced by the more accurate pendulum clock in 17th-century Europe.
The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]
Its display can be turned off or dimmed, so the large, easy-to-read numbers won’t blind you all night long. If you like to wake up to the radio or to an alarm that gets louder over time, you won’t find those features here (though there is a version with a Bluetooth speaker but still no radio). Still, it does its job well, and there’s a reason this clock is found in lots of hotel rooms.
A. Like many items today, the amount you’ll pay for an alarm clock depends on how much technology you want layered onto it. If you desire nothing but a simple analog alarm clock that rouses you with a single tone, you could spend as little as $10. A slightly more sophisticated clock radio might cost $20 or so. If you want a deluxe digital alarm clock with screen projection, Bluetooth capability, MP3 player, or other cool features, you’re looking at a price of anywhere from $40 to $90.
A perfect piece for nightstands and home office desks, this radio alarm clock tunes to your favorite stations as it keeps an eye on the hour. Its bright red LED numbers are easy to read from afar, while the repeating nine-minute snooze is sure to become your new best friend on lazy Sunday mornings. This digital clock includes memory for up to 20 radio stations and includes an audio input for smartphones and MP3 players. Though this radio plugs into your wall, it also runs on two AAA batteries...
Besides the Chinese astronomical clock of Su Song in 1088 mentioned above, in Europe there were the clocks constructed by Richard of Wallingford in St Albans by 1336, and by Giovanni de Dondi in Padua from 1348 to 1364. They no longer exist, but detailed descriptions of their design and construction survive,[22][23] and modern reproductions have been made.[23] They illustrate how quickly the theory of the mechanical clock had been translated into practical constructions, and also that one of the many impulses to their development had been the desire of astronomers to investigate celestial phenomena.
The timekeeping element of a quartz clock consists of a ring of quartz about 2.5 inches (63.5 mm) in diameter, suspended by threads and enclosed in a heat-insulated chamber. Electrodes are attached to the surfaces of the ring and connected to an electrical circuit in such a manner as to sustain oscillations. Since the frequency of vibration, 100,000-hertz, is too high for convenient time measurement, it is reduced by a process known as frequency division or demultiplication and applied to a synchronous motor connected to a clock dial through mechanical gearing. If a 100,000 hertz frequency, for example, is subjected to a combined electrical and mechanical gearing reduction of 6,000,000 to 1, then the second hand of the synchronous clock will make exactly one rotation in 60 seconds. The vibrations are so regular that the maximum error of an observatory quartz-crystal clock is only a few ten-thousandths of a second per day, equivalent to an error of one second every 10 years.
This dual tone wall clock features a handsome Rustic Cherry finish with a contrasting Vintage Umber inset panel. The wood stick moving pendulum features a spun brass-finished bob. Beneath a convex glass crystal, the dial features a two color wood-tone dial with gold Arabic numerals and aged brass-tone spade hands. Finished in distressed Rustic Cherry on select hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement.
Sounds pretty self explanatory, right? You have to get up, position two thumbs on the bottom of the screen, and turn around according to the predesignated amount of spins. You’ll actually have to jerk yourself around, and by the end of it, you’ll look at the bed and say, “Well, I’m already up.” At least, that’s the hope of the app developers. This one comes in handy if paired with louder alarm clocks, as well.
If the last thing you do before closing your eyes for the night is pick up your cell phone to set the alarm, how likely is it that you're just going to do that one thing, then set the phone down on the nightstand? Admit it, you're probably going to check your Instagram, send a text or two, play just one more round of your favorite game, or surf the web.
Can we let you in on a secret? From pocket watches to grandfather clocks, a timepiece often tells as much about its owner as it does the hour. With a piece like this, you can ensure that it makes a statement in rustic-inspired style. Crafted from solid rubberwood with black metal spade handles, this piece is full of cottage charm. Featuring a distressed finish and roman numerals alongside its open back, this piece is sure to make welcome guests to your home with its modern farmhouse details.

The Howard Miller Stapleton Oversized 30" Wall Clock is a wonderful accent piece. The elegant design of this wall clock can add a touch of sophistication to any home decor. This oversized wall clock has numeral as well as hour markers. You can mount this wall clock on any wall in your home or office as it has classic design in contemporary style. The clock has brushed nickel finish that blends well with most of the decor. This wall clock has a great design in round shape with round dial and...
Its display can be turned off or dimmed, so the large, easy-to-read numbers won’t blind you all night long. If you like to wake up to the radio or to an alarm that gets louder over time, you won’t find those features here (though there is a version with a Bluetooth speaker but still no radio). Still, it does its job well, and there’s a reason this clock is found in lots of hotel rooms.
After a long day at work, school, or running errands, it's tough to beat the feeling of climbing into your bed for a good night's rest. When you're feeling tired, it's tough to get back out of bed in the morning to start all over again. With the right alarm clock, you can wake up to pleasant sounds that make it a little easier to get up and going. With a wide selection of alarm clock options available at JCPenney, you can find the style that fits with the look and feel of your bedroom while delivering the functionality you need.
Sync your phone and play music through the Sync your phone and play music through the integrated Bluetooth speaker. With its 1-Amp USB charging port you can charge your mobile device while you sleep. Large easy to read 0.9 in. LED display and soft mood light for nighttime use. Features PM Alarm1 or Alarm2 and Bluetooth indicators. AC ...  More + Product Details Close
Alarmclocksonline.com can also be a great place to find a gift for a loved one or a coworker. With our vast assortment of clocks, you can find the perfect gift for whomever it may be. Get your husband that new mp3 dock he's been hoping for, your coworker a nice digital clock to put on his desk, or grandma a new large faced alarm clock so that she can read it without difficulty. The options are endless.

As of the 2010s, atomic clocks are the most accurate clocks in existence. They are considerably more accurate than quartz clocks as they can be accurate to within a few seconds over thousands of years.[54] Atomic clocks were first theorized by Lord Kelvin in 1879.[55] In the 1930s the development of Magnetic resonance created practical method for doing this.[56] A prototype ammonia maser device was built in 1949 at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS, now NIST). Although it was less accurate than existing quartz clocks, it served to demonstrate the concept.[57][58][59] The first accurate atomic clock, a caesium standard based on a certain transition of the caesium-133 atom, was built by Louis Essen in 1955 at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK.[60] Calibration of the caesium standard atomic clock was carried out by the use of the astronomical time scale ephemeris time (ET).[61] As of 2013, the most stable atomic clocks are ytterbium clocks, which are stable to within less than two parts in 1 quintillion (2×10−18).[62]
Traditional mechanical alarm clocks have one or two bells that ring by means of a mainspring that powers a gear to propel a hammer back and forth between the two bells or between the interior sides of a single bell. In some models, the back encasement of the clock itself acts as the bell. In an electric bell-style alarm clock, the bell is rung by an electromagnetic circuit and armature that turns the circuit on and off repeatedly.[1]
The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]
Any expansion or contraction of the rod caused by changes of temperature will affect the timekeeping of a pendulum; e.g., a pendulum clock with a steel rod will lose one second a day for a rise in temperature of approximately 4 °F (2.2 °C). For accurate timekeeping, the length of the pendulum must be kept as nearly constant as possible. This may be done in several ways, some of which use the differing coefficients of expansion (the amount of expansion per degree change in temperature) of different metals to obtain a cancelling-out effect. In one popular compensation method, the bob consists of a glass or metal jar containing a suitable amount of mercury. The gridiron pendulum employs rods of different metal, usually brass and steel, while in the zinc-iron tube the pendulum rod is made of concentric tubes of zinc and iron. An improved method, however, is to make the pendulum rod from a special alloy called Invar. This material has such a small coefficient of expansion that small changes of temperature have a negligible effect and can easily be compensated for if required.
An alarm clock (alarm for short) is a clock that is designed to alert an individual or group of individuals at specified time. The primary function of these clocks is to awaken people from their night's sleep or short naps; they are sometimes used for other reminders as well. Most use sound; some use light or vibration. Some have sensors to identify when a person is in a light stage of sleep, in order to avoid waking someone who is deeply asleep, which causes tiredness, even if the person has had adequate sleep. To stop the sound or light, a button or handle on the clock is pressed; most clocks automatically stop the alarm if left unattended long enough. A classic analog alarm clock has an extra hand or inset dial that is used to specify the time at which to activate the alarm. Alarm clocks are also found on mobile phones, watches, and computers.
Stay on schedule and charge a range of devices with this innovative iHome dual-alarm clock. Place your compatible smartphone on top of the Qi-certified device for swift wireless charging, or plug your phone into the clock’s handy powered USB port. This iHome dual-alarm clock incorporates NFC technology, so you can connect an array of Bluetooth-enabled devices with a quick touch.
×