Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]


The Howard Miller Angelina 625-636 Wall Clock is part of Howard Millers New 91st Anniversary Edition of clocks. This clock has an aged look that is achieved through spatter marks, the use of a rasp, and well placed dents. The Antique White finish features brown undertones on select hardwood and veneers. The Angelina clocks that are made in 2017 will have the 91st Anniversary Edition inscription on the dial. The dial has an aged look with black Arabic numerals that look worn and charcoal grey hands behind a glass crystal that is convex. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping.
This selection offers an analog display with hands and a built-in digital wall clock. Metallic gray wall clock with a flat bezel framing the dial. White dial with large black Arabic numerals, black hour, minute and second hands beneath a glass crystal. LCD calendar in the dial displays the month, date, and day of the week. Quartz, battery operated movement.
Electric currents can be used to replace the weight or spring as a source of power and as a means of signaling time indications from a central master clock to a wide range of distant indicating dials. Invented in 1840, the first battery electric clock was driven by a spring and pendulum and employed an electrical impulse to operate a number of dials. Considerable experimental work followed, and it was not until 1906 that the first self-contained battery-driven clock was invented.
Now this is an alarm clock for the heaviest sleeper. If you're the type who sleeps through anything — thunderstorms, loud neighbors, earthquakes, the zombie apocalypse — you've finally met your match. Sonic Alert's Sonic Bomb Alarm Clock doesn't just rely on its 113-decibel alarm to pry your eyelids open (for comparison, that's about the same decibel level as a car horn or snow blower going off in your ear), it also has a shaker device that slips underneath your mattress or pillow to jiggle you awake, and red flashing lights that trigger with the alarm.
You’re going to have to admit it to yourself at one point or another—using your smartphone as a digital alarm clock just doesn’t cut it. You sleep through it, you rely on it as a bedroom clock when it’s just not cutting it. Whether you need alarm clocks for heavy sleepers, a projection alarm clock, or a programmable alarm clock that is up to you. You just need to make sure that it works. Fortunately, you know your favorite Gear Hungry experts have whipped up the ten best alarm clock models on the internet.

“This alarm clock will wake you up! I’m totally deaf in one ear and partially deaf in the other. Alarm clocks I used before I purchased this one might as well have been turned off if I happened to have my good ear on the pillow when they went off. This one is loud! Now having said that, its loudness is adjustable, and I found that a low setting of two works just fine for me, but if I am particularly concerned about being awakened, I also set the vibrating disk, which is slipped under the mattress. Believe me: Even if you are totally deaf in both ears, this will wake you up. I was skeptical about the vibrator because I have a thick mattress, but it works with no problem at all! I wholeheartedly recommend this alarm clock for anyone who is hearing impaired.”

Health chose the Sonic Bomb as one of the best alarm clocks for heavy sleepers, commenting that the flashing lights, loud sound, and bed shaker should "deliver the full sensory message that grave danger awaits unless you get out of bed." Reviews.com likes it as well, although they aren't crazy about the appearance of the clock, claiming it looks like a gag gift. Still, they say, "It won us over with how effective and customizable it is."
Who doesn't love an alarm clock that verbally lets you know it's time to get up and start your day? Step aside, Siri, because "Reminder Rosie" is where it's at. You can easily record up to 25 different alarm-reminders at 6 seconds each. So why not wake up to a recording of your kids saying, "Good morning, Mom!"? (Or maybe you don't want that.) We love how you can turn off the alarm by quickly pressing a button or just saying out loud, "Reminder Off." 
There’s a lot of science when it comes to sleeping, and there’s never a short supply of sleep-related tests going on. One of our favorite electronic brands here on Gear Hungry has made the most effective clock (in our humble opinion), and it’s the #8 pick: Philips Wake-Up HF3505. Slow light build mimics the sunrise, and gently pulls you out of a sleep-like trance before hitting you with some serious sound. Between price, effectiveness, and the fact that we didn’t have to chase it around the room (sorry Clocky, we’re not morning people), we absolutely loved this one.
A clock mechanism may be used to control a device according to time, e.g. a central heating system, a VCR, or a time bomb (see: digital counter). Such mechanisms are usually called timers. Clock mechanisms are also used to drive devices such as solar trackers and astronomical telescopes, which have to turn at accurately controlled speeds to counteract the rotation of the Earth.
The Howard Miller Morrison Wall Clock has a contemporary style in a curved structure. This wall clock has a rectangular shape with metallic highlights. The wall clock features a pendulum that makes it functional and a convenient clock to hang on the wall. This wall clock can be mounted on your bedroom wall or even in office. The sturdy clock can also be a great addition in an all boy’s room. This contemporary styled wall clock has a rectangular shape with recessed brushed nickel band...
This Technology Curved Tabletop Clock and weather instrument offers curve-appeal. It also offers dynamic white LED display with a mirrored lens which can be seen from across the room and in darkened rooms. Features dual alarms with adjustable settings: HI/LO sound volume, programmable alarm days, snooze duration (5-60 mins), and auto-dim. Displays your current indoor temperature (F only) and humidity and can charge a mobile device with a bonus USB port in the back of the clock. Table standing...
About 1450, clockmakers working probably in southern Germany or northern Italy began to make small clocks driven by a spring. These were the first portable timepieces, representing an important landmark in horology. The time-telling dials of these clocks usually had an hour hand only (minute hands did not generally appear until the 1650s) and were exposed to the air; there was normally no form of cover such as a glass until the 17th century, though the mechanism was enclosed, and the cases were made of brass.
The timekeeping element of a quartz clock consists of a ring of quartz about 2.5 inches (63.5 mm) in diameter, suspended by threads and enclosed in a heat-insulated chamber. Electrodes are attached to the surfaces of the ring and connected to an electrical circuit in such a manner as to sustain oscillations. Since the frequency of vibration, 100,000-hertz, is too high for convenient time measurement, it is reduced by a process known as frequency division or demultiplication and applied to a synchronous motor connected to a clock dial through mechanical gearing. If a 100,000 hertz frequency, for example, is subjected to a combined electrical and mechanical gearing reduction of 6,000,000 to 1, then the second hand of the synchronous clock will make exactly one rotation in 60 seconds. The vibrations are so regular that the maximum error of an observatory quartz-crystal clock is only a few ten-thousandths of a second per day, equivalent to an error of one second every 10 years.

“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
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