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This looks like a Death Star droid out of a Star Wars movie, but it gets the job done with the tricks up its sleeve. Charge your phone and your tablet at the same time with two power outlets and two USB ports. The alarm clock feature is simple, and while it also projects your tunes via Bluetooth audio, it comes with a surge protector. That’s right; no freak lightning storm is allowed to hold you back. CubieBlue Charging Bluetooth Speaker is still going to work when you plug it back in (even if you threw it across the room).

As of the 2010s, atomic clocks are the most accurate clocks in existence. They are considerably more accurate than quartz clocks as they can be accurate to within a few seconds over thousands of years.[54] Atomic clocks were first theorized by Lord Kelvin in 1879.[55] In the 1930s the development of Magnetic resonance created practical method for doing this.[56] A prototype ammonia maser device was built in 1949 at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS, now NIST). Although it was less accurate than existing quartz clocks, it served to demonstrate the concept.[57][58][59] The first accurate atomic clock, a caesium standard based on a certain transition of the caesium-133 atom, was built by Louis Essen in 1955 at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK.[60] Calibration of the caesium standard atomic clock was carried out by the use of the astronomical time scale ephemeris time (ET).[61] As of 2013, the most stable atomic clocks are ytterbium clocks, which are stable to within less than two parts in 1 quintillion (2×10−18).[62]

The timekeeping element of a quartz clock consists of a ring of quartz about 2.5 inches (63.5 mm) in diameter, suspended by threads and enclosed in a heat-insulated chamber. Electrodes are attached to the surfaces of the ring and connected to an electrical circuit in such a manner as to sustain oscillations. Since the frequency of vibration, 100,000-hertz, is too high for convenient time measurement, it is reduced by a process known as frequency division or demultiplication and applied to a synchronous motor connected to a clock dial through mechanical gearing. If a 100,000 hertz frequency, for example, is subjected to a combined electrical and mechanical gearing reduction of 6,000,000 to 1, then the second hand of the synchronous clock will make exactly one rotation in 60 seconds. The vibrations are so regular that the maximum error of an observatory quartz-crystal clock is only a few ten-thousandths of a second per day, equivalent to an error of one second every 10 years.
While it’s not to be used in lieu of an alarm clock, this handy app will aggravate the hell out of you until you’re awake. You have to vigorously shake your phone for the duration of time previously set, or it’ll keep going. Pair this with sixty seconds after your new alarm clock going off, and you’ll throw yourself into a frenzy that you’ll need to power through to get out of. By that point, you’re already up.
In a master clock system, electricity is used to give direct impulses to the pendulum, which in turn causes the clock’s gear train to move, or to lift a lever after it has imparted an impulse to the pendulum. In various modern master clocks the pendulum operates a light count wheel that turns through the pitch of one tooth every double swing and is arranged to release a lever every half minute. This lever gives an impulse to the pendulum and is then restored to its original position by an electromagnet. The pulse of current that operates the electromagnet can also be transmitted to a series of distant dials, or slave clocks, advancing the hands of each through the space of a half minute. Thus, a master clock can control scores of dials in a large group of buildings, as well as such other apparatus as time recorders and sirens.
Remember a time before everything was digital? Yeah… we don’t either. But a few excellent time-tested products pop up out of the woodwork from time to time, and a traditional dual bell alarm clock does the trick. The hands move silently while you sleep, and buzz like a mother when it’s time to rise and shine. If you’re like us, you’re sometimes bothered by LED flashing you in the face all night. With Peakeep Twin Bell Stereoscopic Clock, you simply touch the button to activate the stereoscopic dial backlight, check the time, and they cop-out for another fifteen minutes. Don’t worry – Peakeep will wake you up.
This fun desk clock from the popular Buddy family of products by Umbra holds the time aloft, grabbing attention and helping remind you of the importance of your time! Constructed of molded material with a soft-touch finish, the clock features a steel base for stability, bend-resistant clock hands, and an enclosed back. Operates on one AA battery (not included). Designed by Alan Wisniewski and Matt Davis for Umbra - the worldwide leader in innovative, casual, contemporary and affordable design...
"A Joy...It's ok...I am struggling to figure out which one is best and deserves to be my personal assistant, but the "InsigniaT - VoiceT Smart Bluetooth Speaker and Alarm Clock with the Google Assistant built in" (you'd think they could come up with a more friendly, catchy name) is pushing me in the Google direction....Best Buy had a great sale on this product and I got it, very nice, google now works great, speaker has very good sound, also can be used as a bluetooth speaker, and can charge a phone, very happy with this product"
The British had predominated in watch manufacture for much of the 17th and 18th centuries, but maintained a system of production that was geared towards high quality products for the elite.[44] Although there was an attempt to modernise clock manufacture with mass production techniques and the application of duplicating tools and machinery by the British Watch Company in 1843, it was in the United States that this system took off. In 1816, Eli Terry and some other Connecticut clockmakers developed a way of mass-producing clocks by using interchangeable parts.[45] Aaron Lufkin Dennison started a factory in 1851 in Massachusetts that also used interchangeable parts, and by 1861 was running a successful enterprise incorporated as the Waltham Watch Company.[46][47]

Certainly not just for telling time, wall clocks are perfect for adding artful appeal to your kitchen wall or acting as a focal point above the living room mantel. Take this one for example: a true traditional, its Roman numeral dial is accented by a world map detailing the face. Crafted from plastic, its frame offers more of a metal-inspired look with molded trim and a bronze finish. Requires one AA battery.
Marathon's Atomic alarm clock with temperature and date is packed with features. It has an ambient light sensor, which allows the auto-night light to illuminate the display when necessary. With a soft amber LED, the large digit display is easy to read at night and becomes even brighter if the Snooze/Light button is pressed. At a glance you can easily see the time, date, day and temperature. The controls on the front of the clock allow you to easily set the alarm, switch between Fahrenheit or...
Some clocks, called 'flip clocks', have digital displays that work mechanically. The digits are painted on sheets of material which are mounted like the pages of a book. Once a minute, a page is turned over to reveal the next digit. These displays are usually easier to read in brightly lit conditions than LCDs or LEDs. Also, they do not go back to 12:00 after a power interruption. Flip clocks generally do not have electronic mechanisms. Usually, they are driven by AC-synchronous motors.
Auditory and projection clocks can be used by people who are blind or have limited vision. There are also clocks for the blind that have displays that can be read by using the sense of touch. Some of these are similar to normal analog displays, but are constructed so the hands can be felt without damaging them. Another type is essentially digital, and uses devices that use a code such as Braille to show the digits so that they can be felt with the fingertips.
Acadia finish on select hardwoods and veneers is heavily distressed by scribes, and worm holes for a natural, rustic appearance — inspired by the natural yet rustic nature of reclaimed woods in beautiful patinas and burnished details. Features a multi-tiered flat top, distinctive columns with corbels frame the door. Circular spun antique nickel-finished dial with black Roman numerals, hour markers, and hands. Antique nickel-finished lyre pendulum. Quartz, battery-operated, triple-chime Harmonic movement plays choice of full Westminster or Ave Maria chimes with strike on the hour with 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4 chimes accordingly; Westminster chime and strike on the hour only; or Bim Bam chime on the hour only. Volume control and automatic nighttime chime shut-off option. Powered by two C sized batteries. One year warranty and Free Shipping
Keep tabs on the time while creating an eye-catching focal point in your ensemble with this stylish wall clock. Crafted from metal, it features a circular silhouette with a black finish around the periphery while its Roman numerals and two spade hands inside are coated in an antique copper coloring. It only needs one AA battery to operate (not included), and is suitable for indoor and outdoor spaces alike. Measures 13.75'' W x 13.75'' H x 2'' D.
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