There’s nothing like seeing the time blasted on the wall in sharp red LED display. It gives you the perfect sense of, “Oh crap, I’m going to be late.” Projection alarm clocks are just plain awesome, and it’s especially true in this model. This isn’t just another electric alarm clock—you get advanced SelfSet technology thrown into this bad boy that’s going to correct the time and date for you, so the Daylight Savings Time ghost of Benjamin Franklin doesn’t haunt you.
This Roman Numerals Vintage Wall Clock makes telling time easier on the eyes. The clock’s backing is made to look like aged barnwood. It has black metal framing and large Roman Numerals on its dial cut from the same black painted metal. Silver studs dot the frame wherever the numerals join it for a striking, yet simple, accent. The hands of the clock are metal too, telling the time with a minute and hour hand. This stunning Roman Numerals Vintage Wall Clock really strikes a chord for home...
The most accurate mechanical timekeeper is the Shortt pendulum clock; it makes use of the movement described above for electric master clock systems. The Shortt pendulum clock consists of two separate clocks, one of which synchronizes the other. The timekeeping element is a pendulum that swings freely, except that once every half minute it receives an impulse from a gently falling lever. This lever is released by an electrical signal transmitted from its slave clock. After the impulse has been sent, a synchronizing signal is transmitted back to the slave clock that ensures that the impulse to the free pendulum will be released exactly a half minute later than the previous impulse. The pendulum swings in a sealed box in which the air is kept at a constant, low pressure. Shortt clocks in observatories are kept in a room, usually a basement, where the temperature remains nearly constant, and under these conditions they can maintain the correct time to within a few thousandths of a second per day.
Not just a functional accent, this oversize wall clock brings pastoral style to any empty space in your abode. Crafted from wood and metal, it features a circular silhouette and cutout roman numerals as well as spade hands fixed atop a floral-inspired motif. Two AA batteries keep this design ticking and tocking, while a 36'' W x 36'' H x 1'' D frame is sure to grab glances in the entryway or over the living room seating group.
You can choose from an analog styled clock to a digital one. Our alarm clocks can vary from old, retro, 1950 styled clocks to modern 2013. Depending on your desire, we have wind up alarm clocks, clocks that do or do not tick, or clocks with or without a built in radio. We have clocks for children, clocks that run on battery, or ones that plug directly into an outlet.
Electric currents can be used to replace the weight or spring as a source of power and as a means of signaling time indications from a central master clock to a wide range of distant indicating dials. Invented in 1840, the first battery electric clock was driven by a spring and pendulum and employed an electrical impulse to operate a number of dials. Considerable experimental work followed, and it was not until 1906 that the first self-contained battery-driven clock was invented.
Not just for keeping your eye on the hour, this eye-catching wall clock lends a touch of retro flair to your ensemble in seconds. Measuring 9.5'' in diameter (so you know it'll fit just about anywhere), this piece pairs a glossy iron frame with a traditional analog dial. This product requires one AA battery to operate, which is not included. The manufacturer for this item provides a limited one-year warranty.
Taking cues from vintage timepieces, this classic round alarm clock ticks boxes for both fashion and function. Measuring just 7.7'' H x 5'' W x 2.3'' D overall, this petite piece is perfectly proportioned to sit on a nightstand, and it makes a subtle ticking sound to provide white noise as you snooze. A metallic finish on the frame offers a bit of sleek style, while twin bells up above help wake you up and keep you on time.
late 14c., clokke, originally "clock with bells," probably from Middle Dutch clocke (Dutch klok) "a clock," from Old North French cloque (Old French cloke, Modern French cloche), from Medieval Latin (7c.) clocca "bell," probably from Celtic (cf. Old Irish clocc, Welsh cloch, Manx clagg "a bell") and spread by Irish missionaries (unless the Celtic words are from Latin); ultimately of imitative origin.
“This was a gift for my elderly, cognitively impaired mother. She was very often confused as to which day it was, the time of day, etc. She would show up at appointments on the wrong day, or think it was morning when it was evening. This clock is fantastic! It has made such a difference. Now she always knows what day and time it is. The clock is also very nice-looking. This was an excellent purchase and highly recommended. I can’t say enough good things about it.”
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