Use your wall space as the board to create your scalable clock. The Blink wall clock by Umbra is a set of black metal indicators and 12 number that mount to the wall with adhesives. Comes with a template to set the scale of the clock on a wall. Clock mechanism mounts to the wall with a screw or nail operate on one AA battery (not included). Designed by Edward Lee and Adrienna Matzeg Umbra original, modern, casual, functional and affordable design for the home.

This 24" large metal Large Wall Clock is finished in a dark rubbed bronze with aged bronze accents at the 3, 6, 9 and 12 positions. The aged dial features a subtle center pattern, aged black Roman numerals, black spade hour and minute hands and a convex glass crystal. A twisted metal ring frames the dial. Quartz, battery operated movement. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
"Very easy to use...Excellent Product...I cannot say enough about this clock -I love the fact mum is hearing my voice on a daily basis even though I live in another country....it's truly a great concept - great design and well worth it for elderly - for dementia patients or even for individuals who need a talking reminder about daily tasks or appts."
“I have searched for a well-designed clock for kids and was so pleased I finally made this purchase. It was definitely pricier than other options, but this one is actually well-designed, usable, and does all the functions well. My daughter loves how cute it is, and the yellow light and green light has allowed us to get more sleep in the mornings, which is priceless. … We don’t use the nap feature or white noise machine all that much, but we like the night-light and wake-up training features. The size is perfect, and it’s not too bright. Plus it has the time on it, which is perfect for my preschooler who is learning about time.”
The British had predominated in watch manufacture for much of the 17th and 18th centuries, but maintained a system of production that was geared towards high quality products for the elite.[44] Although there was an attempt to modernise clock manufacture with mass production techniques and the application of duplicating tools and machinery by the British Watch Company in 1843, it was in the United States that this system took off. In 1816, Eli Terry and some other Connecticut clockmakers developed a way of mass-producing clocks by using interchangeable parts.[45] Aaron Lufkin Dennison started a factory in 1851 in Massachusetts that also used interchangeable parts, and by 1861 was running a successful enterprise incorporated as the Waltham Watch Company.[46][47]
As of the 2010s, atomic clocks are the most accurate clocks in existence. They are considerably more accurate than quartz clocks as they can be accurate to within a few seconds over thousands of years.[54] Atomic clocks were first theorized by Lord Kelvin in 1879.[55] In the 1930s the development of Magnetic resonance created practical method for doing this.[56] A prototype ammonia maser device was built in 1949 at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS, now NIST). Although it was less accurate than existing quartz clocks, it served to demonstrate the concept.[57][58][59] The first accurate atomic clock, a caesium standard based on a certain transition of the caesium-133 atom, was built by Louis Essen in 1955 at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK.[60] Calibration of the caesium standard atomic clock was carried out by the use of the astronomical time scale ephemeris time (ET).[61] As of 2013, the most stable atomic clocks are ytterbium clocks, which are stable to within less than two parts in 1 quintillion (2×10−18).[62]
Pairing a simple design with a contrasting black-and-silver palette, this eye-catching 12" wall clock instantly elevates your favorite aesthetic. Its round silhouette blends effortlessly into both casual or formal spaces, while its clean profile adds sophistication to your decor. Lean into this wall clock's versatility by adding it to a transitional living room arrangement alongside a mid-century-inspired sofa and gently-tufted barrel chairs for a cohesive seating space. Anchor the ensemble...
As of the 2010s, atomic clocks are the most accurate clocks in existence. They are considerably more accurate than quartz clocks as they can be accurate to within a few seconds over thousands of years.[54] Atomic clocks were first theorized by Lord Kelvin in 1879.[55] In the 1930s the development of Magnetic resonance created practical method for doing this.[56] A prototype ammonia maser device was built in 1949 at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS, now NIST). Although it was less accurate than existing quartz clocks, it served to demonstrate the concept.[57][58][59] The first accurate atomic clock, a caesium standard based on a certain transition of the caesium-133 atom, was built by Louis Essen in 1955 at the National Physical Laboratory in the UK.[60] Calibration of the caesium standard atomic clock was carried out by the use of the astronomical time scale ephemeris time (ET).[61] As of 2013, the most stable atomic clocks are ytterbium clocks, which are stable to within less than two parts in 1 quintillion (2×10−18).[62]
Antique styling in a two-tone wall clock features a Worn Black finish with red undertones and a contrasting Antique Red inset panel. Beneath a convex glass crystal, the dial features an Antique Red background with gold Arabic numerals and aged brass-tone spade hands. The wood stick pendulum features a spun brass-finished bob. Finished in Worn Black on select materials, hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement.

The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–348 BC) was said to possess a large water clock with an unspecified alarm signal similar to the sound of a water organ; he used it at night, possibly for signaling the beginning of his lectures at dawn (Athenaeus 4.174c).[2] The Hellenistic engineer and inventor Ctesibius (fl. 285–222 BC) fitted his clepsydras with dial and pointer for indicating the time, and added elaborate "alarm systems, which could be made to drop pebbles on a gong, or blow trumpets (by forcing bell-jars down into water and taking the compressed air through a beating reed) at pre-set times" (Vitruv 11.11).[3]
From the 14th century, some clock towers in Western Europe were also capable of chiming at a fixed time every day; the earliest of these was described by the Florentine writer Dante Alighieri in 1319.[8] The most famous original striking clock tower still standing is possibly the one in St Mark's Clocktower in St Mark's Square, Venice. The St Mark's Clock was assembled in 1493, by the famous clockmaker Gian Carlo Rainieri from Reggio Emilia, where his father Gian Paolo Rainieri had already constructed another famous device in 1481. In 1497, Simone Campanato moulded the great bell (h. 1,56 m., diameter m. 1,27), which was put on the top of the tower where it was alternatively beaten by the Due Mori (Two Moors), two bronze statues (h. 2,60) handling a hammer.
If the last thing you do before closing your eyes for the night is pick up your cell phone to set the alarm, how likely is it that you're just going to do that one thing, then set the phone down on the nightstand? Admit it, you're probably going to check your Instagram, send a text or two, play just one more round of your favorite game, or surf the web.

This looks like a Death Star droid out of a Star Wars movie, but it gets the job done with the tricks up its sleeve. Charge your phone and your tablet at the same time with two power outlets and two USB ports. The alarm clock feature is simple, and while it also projects your tunes via Bluetooth audio, it comes with a surge protector. That’s right; no freak lightning storm is allowed to hold you back. CubieBlue Charging Bluetooth Speaker is still going to work when you plug it back in (even if you threw it across the room).
A standard alarm is often enough to wake most humans, but some people just sleep more deeply than others. For these individuals, the aptly titled SmartShaker 2 is ideal. The thin alarm clock fits comfortably under your pillow and vibrates to wake you. This feature also makes the SmartShaker 2 perfect for those with hearing impairments and couples with different sleep schedules.
The Homedics SoundSpa Digital FM Tabletop Clock with time projection gives you the power to create a soothing, relaxing sleep environment. Choose from eight peaceful relaxation sounds including ocean, white noise, brook, rainforest, thunder, rain, fan, campfire, or simply switch on the radio. The SoundSpa Digital FM Tabletop Clock comes with the option of time projection and a soothing blue light.

Improve independence with this Reminder Rosie personal voice reminder clock. It lets you schedule reminders for your loved one, letting them know what to do and when to do it, which helps seniors maintain independence for as long as possible. This Reminder Rosie alarm clock with personal voice reminder has a senior-friendly clock interface with an enlarged digital display.
The timekeeping element of a quartz clock consists of a ring of quartz about 2.5 inches (63.5 mm) in diameter, suspended by threads and enclosed in a heat-insulated chamber. Electrodes are attached to the surfaces of the ring and connected to an electrical circuit in such a manner as to sustain oscillations. Since the frequency of vibration, 100,000-hertz, is too high for convenient time measurement, it is reduced by a process known as frequency division or demultiplication and applied to a synchronous motor connected to a clock dial through mechanical gearing. If a 100,000 hertz frequency, for example, is subjected to a combined electrical and mechanical gearing reduction of 6,000,000 to 1, then the second hand of the synchronous clock will make exactly one rotation in 60 seconds. The vibrations are so regular that the maximum error of an observatory quartz-crystal clock is only a few ten-thousandths of a second per day, equivalent to an error of one second every 10 years.
“The alarm is loud with a lower frequency melody which I like since I have high-frequency hearing loss. Guaranteed to wake anyone up when the alarm goes off which is super important to me, especially if I’m using the alarm clock to wake up to catch a flight. … When the alarm goes off, press the large snooze bar on the top to have the alarm go off again in five minutes. Pressing the snooze bar on top at anytime also lights up the numbers and bars on the clock’s face, but the hands are a bit hard to see in the dark since the hands don’t light up. When the alarm on/off switch is turned to the off position, there’s a cute voice that says ‘Good Morning!’ which brings a smile to start the day. We love this clock so much, we plan to buy more to give as gifts. We’re sure the recipients will love it as much as we do.”
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