If you’re looking for a way to add some pizazz to your walls as well as some function, wall clocks are a great design choice. You can find a wall clock in almost every shape, style and color. From modern wall clocks like the sunburst clock to antique wall clocks such as the pendulum clock, there’s a style for every room and every home. Some are even designed to fit into specific rooms: there are dozens of kitchen clocks featuring faces shaped like teapots, cows, bottles of milk and more. There’s even incentive to go big, as large wall clocks can become a statement piece in the same way a large mirror or work of art can.
A vintaged take on traditional style, this alarm clock brings time-honored style to any space, without breaking the bank. Crafted from metal, this analog alarm clock showcasing a round face sitting atop a molded base. Giving this piece a distinctive look is an antiqued face, outfitted with glow-in-the-dark hour and minute hands. Black and neutral hues round out this clock's color palette, accented with distressed details. Measured at under half-a-foot tall and wide, this lightweight clock is...
The Howard Miller Spokane 15.75" Wall Clock is a piece of classic design and features. This simple yet functional timepiece has a brushed aluminum finish. This round shape clock is very convenient and can be mounted on any wall of your home. This wall clock can be used for residential as well as commercial use as it has simple and subtle. This round wall clock from Spokane has a silver finished case with white background for ease at readability. This wall clock is numbered and features Arabic...

Many alarm clocks have radio receivers that can be set to start playing at specified times, and are known as clock radios. Some alarm clocks can set multiple alarms, a useful feature for couples who have different waking up schedules. A progressive alarm clock, still new in the market, can have different alarms for different times (see Next-Generation Alarms) and even play music of your choice. Most modern televisions, mobile phones and digital watches have alarm clock functions to turn on or make sounds at a specific time.
The word horologia (from the Greek ὥρα, hour, and λέγειν, to tell) was used to describe early mechanical clocks,[15] but the use of this word (still used in several Romance languages) [16] for all timekeepers conceals the true nature of the mechanisms. For example, there is a record that in 1176 Sens Cathedral installed a ‘horologe’[17] but the mechanism used is unknown. According to Jocelin of Brakelond, in 1198 during a fire at the abbey of St Edmundsbury (now Bury St Edmunds), the monks 'ran to the clock' to fetch water, indicating that their water clock had a reservoir large enough to help extinguish the occasional fire.[18] The word clock (from the Celtic words clocca and clogan, both meaning "bell"), which gradually supersedes "horologe", suggests that it was the sound of bells which also characterized the prototype mechanical clocks that appeared during the 13th century in Europe.

“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”


In a master clock system, electricity is used to give direct impulses to the pendulum, which in turn causes the clock’s gear train to move, or to lift a lever after it has imparted an impulse to the pendulum. In various modern master clocks the pendulum operates a light count wheel that turns through the pitch of one tooth every double swing and is arranged to release a lever every half minute. This lever gives an impulse to the pendulum and is then restored to its original position by an electromagnet. The pulse of current that operates the electromagnet can also be transmitted to a series of distant dials, or slave clocks, advancing the hands of each through the space of a half minute. Thus, a master clock can control scores of dials in a large group of buildings, as well as such other apparatus as time recorders and sirens.
Coordinated Universal Time offset UT ΔT DUT1 International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service ISO 31-1 ISO 8601 International Atomic Time 6-hour clock 12-hour clock 24-hour clock Barycentric Coordinate Time Barycentric Dynamical Time Civil time Daylight saving time Geocentric Coordinate Time International Date Line Leap second Solar time Terrestrial Time Time zone 180th meridian

The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]
As stylish as it is functional, this lovely clock lends a touch of charm and classic appeal to your tabletop display. A traditional design, it showcases a rounded frame with a pedestal base and a solid black finish. The neutral-toned clock face is accented with black Roman numeral numbering and three thin black hands. Crafted from plastic, it is a budget-friendly choice. It also features a beeping alarm for added convenience.
In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.
Clocks aren't just for telling time! Take this one for example: artful with its understated analog dial, this piece is perfect lending an upscale feel to your living room look or kitchen ensemble. Measuring 16'' circular, its frame features a glass design accented by a shiny chrome center and openwork hands to mark the hour. This product required one AA battery to operate, which is not included. Suitable for indoor use only.
Some water clock designs were developed independently and some knowledge was transferred through the spread of trade. Pre-modern societies do not have the same precise timekeeping requirements that exist in modern industrial societies, where every hour of work or rest is monitored, and work may start or finish at any time regardless of external conditions. Instead, water clocks in ancient societies were used mainly for astrological reasons. These early water clocks were calibrated with a sundial. While never reaching the level of accuracy of a modern timepiece, the water clock was the most accurate and commonly used timekeeping device for millennia, until it was replaced by the more accurate pendulum clock in 17th-century Europe.
Use of a Clock is optional. All key date-time classes also have a now() factory method that uses the system clock in the default time zone. The primary purpose of this abstraction is to allow alternate clocks to be plugged in as and when required. Applications use an object to obtain the current time rather than a static method. This can simplify testing.

In order to shut off this loud alarm, you have to actually get out of bed and stand on the rug for three seconds. But if you find yourself cheating your alarm by crawling back into bed after those few seconds, you can extend the alarm for up to 30 seconds, ensuring you’ll be much more awake once the blood starts flowing to the other parts of your body.
You also need an alarm clock when you have a job or you're in school. It's important for you to wake up on time and avoid being tardy. Arriving late to work is an offense that could get you fired from your job, especially if happens more than once. Missing class because you slept in will also slow your educational progress and waste your money. When you put your alarm clock on your dresser instead of putting it right by your bed, you'll have to get up to turn it off, which helps you get going for the day.
Some clocks have several displays driven by a single mechanism, and some others have several completely separate mechanisms in a single case. Clocks in public places often have several faces visible from different directions, so that the clock can be read from anywhere in the vicinity; all the faces show the same time. Other clocks show the current time in several time-zones. Watches that are intended to be carried by travellers often have two displays, one for the local time and the other for the time at home, which is useful for making pre-arranged phone calls. Some equation clocks have two displays, one showing mean time and the other solar time, as would be shown by a sundial. Some clocks have both analog and digital displays. Clocks with Braille displays usually also have conventional digits so they can be read by sighted people.
In 1815, Francis Ronalds published the first electric clock powered by dry pile batteries.[48] Alexander Bain, Scottish clockmaker, patented the electric clock in 1840. The electric clock's mainspring is wound either with an electric motor or with an electromagnet and armature. In 1841, he first patented the electromagnetic pendulum. By the end of the nineteenth century, the advent of the dry cell battery made it feasible to use electric power in clocks. Spring or weight driven clocks that use electricity, either alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC), to rewind the spring or raise the weight of a mechanical clock would be classified as an electromechanical clock. This classification would also apply to clocks that employ an electrical impulse to propel the pendulum. In electromechanical clocks the electricity serves no time keeping function. These types of clocks were made as individual timepieces but more commonly used in synchronized time installations in schools, businesses, factories, railroads and government facilities as a master clock and slave clocks.

With it's quality construction and stylish mid-century modern design, the 31.5" Rumi Mid Century Wall Clock is an attractive accent for the home. Crafted entirely of iron, this large wall clock features a dark brown distressed finish and large distressed gold hands. Minimalism is reflected in the clock's open pass-through design. This clock is a must-have for anyone in search of mid-century modern inspired decor.


Some predecessors to the modern clock may be considered as "clocks" that are based on movement in nature: A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a flat surface. There is a range of duration timers, a well-known example being the hourglass. Water clocks, along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments. A major advance occurred with the invention of the verge escapement, which made possible the first mechanical clocks around 1300 in Europe, which kept time with oscillating timekeepers like balance wheels.[1][2][3][4]
A wall clock is not only a household necessity, but can also be a stylish home accent piece. Features like analog roman numerals or digital displays can reflect a classic or high-tech style, an oversized silver metal clock can turn a wall into a decor feature, and a beautiful and ornate antique piece can lend a stately touch. Available in a wide variety of other designs and themes, choosing a wall clock to complement your decor can be easy and fun.
Acadia finish on select hardwoods and veneers is heavily distressed by scribes, and worm holes for a natural, rustic appearance — inspired by the natural yet rustic nature of reclaimed woods in beautiful patinas and burnished details. Features a multi-tiered flat top, distinctive columns with corbels frame the door. Circular spun antique nickel-finished dial with black Roman numerals, hour markers, and hands. Antique nickel-finished lyre pendulum. Quartz, battery-operated, triple-chime Harmonic movement plays choice of full Westminster or Ave Maria chimes with strike on the hour with 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4 chimes accordingly; Westminster chime and strike on the hour only; or Bim Bam chime on the hour only. Volume control and automatic nighttime chime shut-off option. Powered by two C sized batteries. One year warranty and Free Shipping

Vintage, contemporary, rustic, classic, novelty, and traditional are just a few of the styles of wall clocks available. Classic and traditional clocks generally feature simple numbers or roman numerals that make checking the time at a glance easy. Rustic, nautical, and country themes typically feature pictures of animals or rural and seaside scenes. Contemporary styles often use an abstract design that may lack numbers altogether. Vintage and antique styles of wall clocks may be simple or ornate, and have a midcentury or older look. A wide variety of fun novelty options are also available, ranging from famous characters and well-known brands to glow-in-the-dark and reversed numeral designs.
A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The position of a ship at sea could be determined with reasonable accuracy if a navigator could refer to a clock that lost or gained less than about 10 seconds per day. This clock could not contain a pendulum, which would be virtually useless on a rocking ship. In 1714, the British government offered large financial rewards to the value of 20,000 pounds,[42] for anyone who could determine longitude accurately. John Harrison, who dedicated his life to improving the accuracy of his clocks, later received considerable sums under the Longitude Act.
Only at Best Buy Find your favorite songs with the simple sound of your voice with this Insignia voice-activated wireless speaker. Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity let you pair with compatible devices for more enjoyment, and Google Assistant is included to answer questions or search the internet. This Insignia voice-activated wireless speaker features a compact footprint and brilliant display.
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