An artful accent is all your need to take your entertaining space from every day to eye-catching. While low-slung sofas and a plush shag rug make a fine foundation, you can effortlessly dress it all up by centering this chic clock on the wall above. Pairing brushed aluminum metal with walnut-finished wood panels, this sunburst-inspired piece is brimming with mid-century style. Let it shine solo above an exposed light bulb lamp sitting on an end table so you can watch the time at your pre-dinner...
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Incorporating clocks into your home design is a way to better keep track of time and can make a unique style statement in your home. Clocks work well in every room of your home, from the living room to the bedroom. You can find wall clocks, mantel clocks, grandfather clocks and outdoor clocks that fit your personal style. Large wall clocks look beautiful in your home and are elegant focal piece in your living room. Make sure that you match the style and texture of your clock to the décor in your home. You can use stylish clocks in your home to accessorize thematic designs and emphasize specific areas of your home.
Coordinated Universal Time offset UT ΔT DUT1 International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service ISO 31-1 ISO 8601 International Atomic Time 6-hour clock 12-hour clock 24-hour clock Barycentric Coordinate Time Barycentric Dynamical Time Civil time Daylight saving time Geocentric Coordinate Time International Date Line Leap second Solar time Terrestrial Time Time zone 180th meridian
In order to shut off this loud alarm, you have to actually get out of bed and stand on the rug for three seconds. But if you find yourself cheating your alarm by crawling back into bed after those few seconds, you can extend the alarm for up to 30 seconds, ensuring you’ll be much more awake once the blood starts flowing to the other parts of your body.
In mechanical clocks this is done mechanically by a gear train, known as the wheel train. The gear train also has a second function; to transmit mechanical power from the power source to run the oscillator. There is a friction coupling called the 'cannon pinion' between the gears driving the hands and the rest of the clock, allowing the hands to be turned to set the time.[73]

The Howard Miller Brohman 625-618 Large Wall Clock has a brushed, warm brown finish and metallic undertones. At 34" in diameter with a 22" aged dial this clock will fit just about any decor. With large Roman numerals and black hands this clock will be a favorite for years to come. Highly accurate quartz movement requires one AA battery (Not Included).


Most digital clocks use electronic mechanisms and LCD, LED, or VFD displays; many other display technologies are used as well (cathode ray tubes, nixie tubes, etc.). After a reset, battery change or power failure, these clocks without a backup battery or capacitor either start counting from 12:00, or stay at 12:00, often with blinking digits indicating that the time needs to be set. Some newer clocks will reset themselves based on radio or Internet time servers that are tuned to national atomic clocks. Since the advent of digital clocks in the 1960s, the use of analog clocks has declined significantly.

In China, a striking clock was devised by the Buddhist monk and inventor Yi Xing (683–727).[5] The Chinese engineers Zhang Sixun and Su Song integrated striking clock mechanisms in astronomical clocks in the 10th and 11th centuries, respectively.[6] A striking clock outside of China was the water-powered clock tower near the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, Syria, which struck once every hour. It was constructed by the Arab engineer al-Kaysarani in 1154. In 1235, an early monumental water-powered alarm clock that "announced the appointed hours of prayer and the time both by day and by night" was completed in the entrance hall of the Mustansiriya Madrasah in Baghdad.[7]
A water-powered cogwheel clock was created in China in AD 725 by Yi Xing and Liang Lingzan. This is not considered an escapement mechanism clock as it was unidirectional, the Song dynasty polymath and genius Su Song (1020–1101) incorporated it into his monumental innovation of the astronomical clock-tower of Kaifeng in 1088.[19][page needed] His astronomical clock and rotating armillary sphere still relied on the use of either flowing water during the spring, summer, autumn seasons and liquid mercury during the freezing temperature of winter (i.e. hydraulics). A mercury clock, described in the Libros del saber, a Spanish work from 1277 consisting of translations and paraphrases of Arabic works, is sometimes quoted as evidence for Muslim knowledge of a mechanical clock. A mercury-powered cogwheel clock was created by Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi[20][21]
A piece of art and a functional home essential – this wall clock is a lovely addition to any home. Inspired by contemporary designs, it showcases an open frame crafted from metal wire. The geometric pattern will stand out against any color wall, while the golden finish adds a pop of glamorous appeal. At the center is a golden disk with two sleek black hands. This wall clock requires two AA batteries (not included).

The Howard Miller Brohman 625-618 Large Wall Clock has a brushed, warm brown finish and metallic undertones. At 34" in diameter with a 22" aged dial this clock will fit just about any decor. With large Roman numerals and black hands this clock will be a favorite for years to come. Highly accurate quartz movement requires one AA battery (Not Included).
Islamic civilization is credited with further advancing the accuracy of clocks with elaborate engineering. In 797 (or possibly 801), the Abbasid caliph of Baghdad, Harun al-Rashid, presented Charlemagne with an Asian Elephant named Abul-Abbas together with a "particularly elaborate example" of a water[12] clock. Pope Sylvester II introduced clocks to northern and western Europe around 1000AD[13]
“I am the heaviest sleeper and was setting four or five alarms on my phone to wake me up. After being late a few times, I decided to purchase this alarm clock to help me wake up on time. I couldn’t be happier with my purchase. … The bed shaker is super important. I put it under my pillow, and it shook me awake; the loud beep helped too. If you can sleep through earthquakes and shouting family members, this is the alarm clock for you.”
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