“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
More than just a tool for keeping track of the time, this eye-catching wall clock helps turn any empty wall into an artful display. Crafted from injection plastic finished in a sleek metallic tone, it features a circular center with rods all around extending to stage the numbers of an analog dial. Measuring 16'' in diameter, it makes a statement on your kitchen or entryway wall without dominating the decor.
In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.
These mechanical clocks were intended for two main purposes: for signalling and notification (e.g. the timing of services and public events), and for modeling the solar system. The former purpose is administrative, the latter arises naturally given the scholarly interests in astronomy, science, astrology, and how these subjects integrated with the religious philosophy of the time. The astrolabe was used both by astronomers and astrologers, and it was natural to apply a clockwork drive to the rotating plate to produce a working model of the solar system.
If you’ve never seen an alarm clock that can project the time onto the wall, you may be surprised at how handy this function can be. This Mesqool clock can project the time onto the ceiling, the curtains, or just about any other surface, thanks to the 180-degree swivel. So instead of squinting at the clock through sleepy eyes in the morning, you can just look up at the ceiling. The clock also includes AM/FM Radio, so you can listen to your favorite morning talk shows or follow along with your sports team while you get ready in the morning.
An on-trend take on a retro design, this 12" round wall clock brings a splash of color to any space in your home. This budget-friendly accent showcases a circular face bordered by alternating blocks of green, blue, and red hues with black Roman numerals in the center. Its plastic frame ensures that it’s lightweight and easy to hang, while its metallic pierced hands offer subtle shimmer. This piece does not include batteries.

For some scientific work timing of the utmost accuracy is essential. It is also necessary to have a standard of the maximum accuracy against which working clocks can be calibrated. An ideal clock would give the time to unlimited accuracy, but this is not realisable. Many physical processes, in particular including some transitions between atomic energy levels, occur at exceedingly stable frequency; counting cycles of such a process can give a very accurate and consistent time—clocks which work this way are usually called atomic clocks. Such clocks are typically large, very expensive, require a controlled environment, and are far more accurate than required for most purposes; they are typically used in a standards laboratory.
Molded by mid-century modern style, this 38" wall clock brings a bit of bold flair to any space in your home. Its generous size helps it grab glances (and compliments!) from guests, while its open and numberless design gives it a minimalist feel. Crafted from metal, this round silhouette sports a gold finish with silver-finished hands in the center for subtle contrast. Two AA batteries (not included) are required to operate.
Reminisce fond memories of your school years with this 8.3" Retro Modern Wall Clock. Fashioned with contemporary and retro accents, the wall clock will transport you to your childhood days with its vintage design. Indulge in nostalgia with this simple and elegant wall clock. Crafted out of ABS thermoplastic and glass components, the wall clock is will elevate the vintage style of your home. The top and base materials are made out of sturdy ABS thermoplastic which gently wraps itself around the...
Any expansion or contraction of the rod caused by changes of temperature will affect the timekeeping of a pendulum; e.g., a pendulum clock with a steel rod will lose one second a day for a rise in temperature of approximately 4 °F (2.2 °C). For accurate timekeeping, the length of the pendulum must be kept as nearly constant as possible. This may be done in several ways, some of which use the differing coefficients of expansion (the amount of expansion per degree change in temperature) of different metals to obtain a cancelling-out effect. In one popular compensation method, the bob consists of a glass or metal jar containing a suitable amount of mercury. The gridiron pendulum employs rods of different metal, usually brass and steel, while in the zinc-iron tube the pendulum rod is made of concentric tubes of zinc and iron. An improved method, however, is to make the pendulum rod from a special alloy called Invar. This material has such a small coefficient of expansion that small changes of temperature have a negligible effect and can easily be compensated for if required.
“This little beauty works great. I bought it when the alarm on my mobile phone began to intermittently fail me. This little travel clock is beautiful in retro seafoam green and great for travel because its bright color ensures that you will never miss picking it up from your hotel nightstand at checkout. There is a faint, pleasant ticking, the hands glow in the dark, and the nightlight button is bright when needed. The pop-up alarm button is firm and works well though I am learning not to accidentally press it and turn the alarm off when picking up the clock. Overall, a fantastic alarm clock.”
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