Some clocks, called 'flip clocks', have digital displays that work mechanically. The digits are painted on sheets of material which are mounted like the pages of a book. Once a minute, a page is turned over to reveal the next digit. These displays are usually easier to read in brightly lit conditions than LCDs or LEDs. Also, they do not go back to 12:00 after a power interruption. Flip clocks generally do not have electronic mechanisms. Usually, they are driven by AC-synchronous motors.
Minimalist design and modern style combine in this 11" wall clock. Set under a clear glass lens on chrome posts, the streamlined dial showcases chrome military indicators on the 12, 3, 6, and 9 over a warm brown woodgrain background, while the unadorned face of the clock takes the form of a brushed metal disk. Operated by a AA battery (not included), a quartz crystal movement keeps the simple baton hour, minute, and second hands ticking away in time.
This farmhouse wall clock measures 30 in. across This farmhouse wall clock measures 30 in. across the face and features horizontal cedar wood slats a white distressed finish hand painted black Roman numerals in a Poster Condensed font and an inner accent ring with individual hour marks. It includes a high torque quartz movement antique-style spade hands and ...  More + Product Details Close
Traditional led alarm clock models just don’t work for you? No problem. Blast your favorite mp3s or just have a crazy loud sound go off. You have to get up and actually step on this Instecho Carpet Alarm Clock to get it to stop, which is no problem.You’ll jump up, stomp on the mat, and be done with it—set it to play tunes for you afterwards (at a decent audio level) as a mini reward system. This mat gets up to 120 decibels (think as loud as two window unit air conditioners).
During the 15th and 16th centuries, clockmaking flourished, particularly in the metalworking towns of Nuremberg and Augsburg, and in Blois, France. Some of the more basic table clocks have only one time-keeping hand, with the dial between the hour markers being divided into four equal parts making the clocks readable to the nearest 15 minutes. Other clocks were exhibitions of craftsmanship and skill, incorporating astronomical indicators and musical movements. The cross-beat escapement was invented in 1584 by Jost Bürgi, who also developed the remontoire. Bürgi's clocks were a great improvement in accuracy as they were correct to within a minute a day.[35][36] These clocks helped the 16th-century astronomer Tycho Brahe to observe astronomical events with much greater precision than before.[citation needed][how?]
Now this is an alarm clock for the heaviest sleeper. If you're the type who sleeps through anything — thunderstorms, loud neighbors, earthquakes, the zombie apocalypse — you've finally met your match. Sonic Alert's Sonic Bomb Alarm Clock doesn't just rely on its 113-decibel alarm to pry your eyelids open (for comparison, that's about the same decibel level as a car horn or snow blower going off in your ear), it also has a shaker device that slips underneath your mattress or pillow to jiggle you awake, and red flashing lights that trigger with the alarm.
Besides the Chinese astronomical clock of Su Song in 1088 mentioned above, in Europe there were the clocks constructed by Richard of Wallingford in St Albans by 1336, and by Giovanni de Dondi in Padua from 1348 to 1364. They no longer exist, but detailed descriptions of their design and construction survive,[22][23] and modern reproductions have been made.[23] They illustrate how quickly the theory of the mechanical clock had been translated into practical constructions, and also that one of the many impulses to their development had been the desire of astronomers to investigate celestial phenomena.
This massive iron wall clock is 49" in diameter and is finished in off-white with an antique nickel outer ring that is moderately distressed and dented for an aged appearance. Black Roman numerals are centered on individual antique off-white panels. Quartz, battery-operated movement requires one AA sized battery. Some assembly is required. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
The OK to Wake! alarm clock and nap timer is a useful tool for parents with young kids learning the importance of sleep schedules. When it's OK for a child to get out of bed (aka when the alarm or nap timer goes off) the clock will light up green, providing an easy-to-understand visual cue for little ones to start their day. It even has interchangeable face plates to suit aesthetic preferences.
“This was a gift for my elderly, cognitively impaired mother. She was very often confused as to which day it was, the time of day, etc. She would show up at appointments on the wrong day, or think it was morning when it was evening. This clock is fantastic! It has made such a difference. Now she always knows what day and time it is. The clock is also very nice-looking. This was an excellent purchase and highly recommended. I can’t say enough good things about it.”
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