For convenience, distance, telephony or blindness, auditory clocks present the time as sounds. The sound is either spoken natural language, (e.g. "The time is twelve thirty-five"), or as auditory codes (e.g. number of sequential bell rings on the hour represents the number of the hour like the bell, Big Ben). Most telecommunication companies also provide a speaking clock service as well.


Fellow tea-lovers, all of our dreams are coming true! We can finally wake up to the smells and sounds of freshly brewed tea with the Teasmade Alarm Clock. Instead of making screeching noises to get you out of bed, it'll first brew you a fresh cup of tea at the time of your choice, and then sound an alarm after boiling is complete. After dark, the face of the clock illuminates with an adjustable blue night light that's dim enough to not disturb light-sensitive sleepers.

Showcasing the time, date, and weather, this clock is an essential for any desk. No need to lift your arm and look at your watch or light up your phone screen, this 0.3'' H x 3.7'' W x 1.5'' D design is an easy way to get the info you need. A vibrant blue backlight keeps it illuminated (requiring the power of a AA battery), while a plastic frame allows it to stand upright.
Many alarm clocks have radio receivers that can be set to start playing at specified times, and are known as clock radios. Some alarm clocks can set multiple alarms, a useful feature for couples who have different waking up schedules. A progressive alarm clock, still new in the market, can have different alarms for different times (see Next-Generation Alarms) and even play music of your choice. Most modern televisions, mobile phones and digital watches have alarm clock functions to turn on or make sounds at a specific time.
A vintaged take on traditional style, this alarm clock brings time-honored style to any space, without breaking the bank. Crafted from metal, this analog alarm clock showcasing a round face sitting atop a molded base. Giving this piece a distinctive look is an antiqued face, outfitted with glow-in-the-dark hour and minute hands. Black and neutral hues round out this clock's color palette, accented with distressed details. Measured at under half-a-foot tall and wide, this lightweight clock is...
Wallingford's clock had a large astrolabe-type dial, showing the sun, the moon's age, phase, and node, a star map, and possibly the planets. In addition, it had a wheel of fortune and an indicator of the state of the tide at London Bridge. Bells rang every hour, the number of strokes indicating the time.[22] Dondi's clock was a seven-sided construction, 1 metre high, with dials showing the time of day, including minutes, the motions of all the known planets, an automatic calendar of fixed and movable feasts, and an eclipse prediction hand rotating once every 18 years.[23] It is not known how accurate or reliable these clocks would have been. They were probably adjusted manually every day to compensate for errors caused by wear and imprecise manufacture. Water clocks are sometimes still used today, and can be examined in places such as ancient castles and museums. The Salisbury Cathedral clock, built in 1386, is considered to be the world's oldest surviving mechanical clock that strikes the hours.[24]
"love it...Not bad...The alarm clock is one of the best I have had, the kids enjoy the extra interactions, and having music anywhere without having to connect my phone to a speaker has been wonderful....I just broadcast a message to them and a glass of water appears in my room LOL I like that it can be controlled from the clock or my phone, so no matter when I am I can broadcast or turn their music down"
By the time that phone hits the nightstand, you've lost precious sleep time, you've tricked your brain into thinking it's wake-up time instead of dream time, because the glow of the blue light emitted by your phone reduces your body's release of melatonin, the hormone that regulates your sleep cycle. Instead of relaxing, you've stimulated your mind. All of that adds up to poor quality sleep followed by a groggy, foggy, "I don't know why I'm so tired," kind of morning.

Rise and shine, rebel. This Stormtrooper comes to you, bringing news of a peace proposal with the empire. See those bright numbers displayed brilliantly on its LCD screen? That means it's time to go. Adjustable arms point toward the door, beckoning for you to make haste. But before you head off to save the galaxy, you might want to turn your Lego alarm clock off first. Plus, if you're a Darth Vader fan, you can get this alarm clock with him, too!


Fortunately, Ruggie takes the ease and convenience out of simply rolling over and slapping “snooze.” With Ruggie, you must apply pressure to a plush mat for three seconds to stop the alarm. The alarm can be set to 120 decibels, too, to further annoy you out of bed. For sake of perspective, 120 decibels is on par with the noise level of a chainsaw. Pleasant.
An on-trend take on a retro design, this 12" round wall clock brings a splash of color to any space in your home. This budget-friendly accent showcases a circular face bordered by alternating blocks of green, blue, and red hues with black Roman numerals in the center. Its plastic frame ensures that it’s lightweight and easy to hang, while its metallic pierced hands offer subtle shimmer. This piece does not include batteries.
Early clock dials did not indicate minutes and seconds. A clock with a dial indicating minutes was illustrated in a 1475 manuscript by Paulus Almanus,[31] and some 15th-century clocks in Germany indicated minutes and seconds.[32] An early record of a seconds hand on a clock dates back to about 1560 on a clock now in the Fremersdorf collection.[33]:417–418[34]
Many devices can be used to mark passage of time without respect to reference time (time of day, minutes, etc.) and can be useful for measuring duration or intervals. Examples of such duration timers are candle clocks, incense clocks and the hourglass. Both the candle clock and the incense clock work on the same principle wherein the consumption of resources is more or less constant allowing reasonably precise and repeatable estimates of time passages. In the hourglass, fine sand pouring through a tiny hole at a constant rate indicates an arbitrary, predetermined, passage of time. The resource is not consumed but re-used.
Sounds pretty self explanatory, right? You have to get up, position two thumbs on the bottom of the screen, and turn around according to the predesignated amount of spins. You’ll actually have to jerk yourself around, and by the end of it, you’ll look at the bed and say, “Well, I’m already up.” At least, that’s the hope of the app developers. This one comes in handy if paired with louder alarm clocks, as well.

This 24" large metal Large Wall Clock is finished in a dark rubbed bronze with aged bronze accents at the 3, 6, 9 and 12 positions. The aged dial features a subtle center pattern, aged black Roman numerals, black spade hour and minute hands and a convex glass crystal. A twisted metal ring frames the dial. Quartz, battery operated movement. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
It is undesirable to give someone a clock or (depending on the region) other timepiece as a gift. Traditional superstitions regard this as counting the seconds to the recipient's death. Another common interpretation of this is that the phrase "to give a clock" (simplified Chinese: 送钟; traditional Chinese: 送鐘) in Chinese is pronounced "sòng zhōng" in Mandarin, which is a homophone of a phrase for "terminating" or "attending a funeral" (both can be written as 送終 (traditional) or 送终 (simplified)). Cantonese people consider such a gift as a curse.[79]

If you’re looking for a calmer start to your day, you might want to try the Wake-Up Light. It gradually gets you up and out of bed with a colored sunrise simulation and a selection of nature-inspired sounds, so that you can start the day feeling refreshed and energized—as if you had woken up naturally. For anyone who finds it particularly hard to get out of bed when it’s cold and dark out, this alarm clock makes those winter mornings that little bit easier. It also comes with a nighttime dimming feature so that you can make sure you’re getting your best night’s rest.
A: This is difficult because it works differently for everyone involved. If you’re just not able to wake up properly, then you’re probably what most of us are: tired from the constant stress of life and trying to sleep it off to a healthy level. It’s exhausting, all of life. Waking up faster and feeling fuller right when you hit the ground is a must, and it’s difficult. Here’s what to do:
late 14c., clokke, originally "clock with bells," probably from Middle Dutch clocke (Dutch klok) "a clock," from Old North French cloque (Old French cloke, Modern French cloche), from Medieval Latin (7c.) clocca "bell," probably from Celtic (cf. Old Irish clocc, Welsh cloch, Manx clagg "a bell") and spread by Irish missionaries (unless the Celtic words are from Latin); ultimately of imitative origin.
Showcasing the time, date, and weather, this clock is an essential for any desk. No need to lift your arm and look at your watch or light up your phone screen, this 0.3'' H x 3.7'' W x 1.5'' D design is an easy way to get the info you need. A vibrant blue backlight keeps it illuminated (requiring the power of a AA battery), while a plastic frame allows it to stand upright.

The OK to Wake! alarm clock and nap timer is a useful tool for parents with young kids learning the importance of sleep schedules. When it's OK for a child to get out of bed (aka when the alarm or nap timer goes off) the clock will light up green, providing an easy-to-understand visual cue for little ones to start their day. It even has interchangeable face plates to suit aesthetic preferences.
To truly earn its place on your nightstand, an alarm clock should be reliable and versatile, letting you customize your wake-up experience without letting you down. This model is actually more than just an alarm: It has two USB chargers and two outlets. That alone means you and your significant other might fight for who gets to put this clock next to their side of the bed. Thanks to its backup battery, you won’t have a Home Alone oversleeping situation when you need to get to the airport or the power goes out. There’s a big snooze button for those mornings when you need some extra Zs.

A water-powered cogwheel clock was created in China in AD 725 by Yi Xing and Liang Lingzan. This is not considered an escapement mechanism clock as it was unidirectional, the Song dynasty polymath and genius Su Song (1020–1101) incorporated it into his monumental innovation of the astronomical clock-tower of Kaifeng in 1088.[19][page needed] His astronomical clock and rotating armillary sphere still relied on the use of either flowing water during the spring, summer, autumn seasons and liquid mercury during the freezing temperature of winter (i.e. hydraulics). A mercury clock, described in the Libros del saber, a Spanish work from 1277 consisting of translations and paraphrases of Arabic works, is sometimes quoted as evidence for Muslim knowledge of a mechanical clock. A mercury-powered cogwheel clock was created by Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi[20][21]
The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–348 BC) was said to possess a large water clock with an unspecified alarm signal similar to the sound of a water organ; he used it at night, possibly for signaling the beginning of his lectures at dawn (Athenaeus 4.174c).[2] The Hellenistic engineer and inventor Ctesibius (fl. 285–222 BC) fitted his clepsydras with dial and pointer for indicating the time, and added elaborate "alarm systems, which could be made to drop pebbles on a gong, or blow trumpets (by forcing bell-jars down into water and taking the compressed air through a beating reed) at pre-set times" (Vitruv 11.11).[3]
Transform an open and plain wall into a timeless focal point with this oversized clock, a versatile addition that lends any room in your home a touch of charm. Crafted of metal, this gray-finished piece features inner and outer rings connected by large Roman numerals that bring classic appeal to your space. This open-faced design is perfect for making a statement without overwhelming your arrangement. Mount this analog over a well-worn leather sofa so you don't lose track of the time as you...
Some predecessors to the modern clock may be considered as "clocks" that are based on movement in nature: A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a flat surface. There is a range of duration timers, a well-known example being the hourglass. Water clocks, along with the sundials, are possibly the oldest time-measuring instruments. A major advance occurred with the invention of the verge escapement, which made possible the first mechanical clocks around 1300 in Europe, which kept time with oscillating timekeepers like balance wheels.[1][2][3][4]
This alarm clock uses scent cartridges to wake you up to the smell of your favorite things, from bacon (!!!) to sweet peach. You can purchase any variety of cartridges you'd like (scents include bacon, cappuccino, mint, strawberry candy, banana, and sweet peach), but your initial purchase will come with one bacon capsule. Each cartridge contains 30 wake-ups.
The timekeeping part of all weight-driven clocks, including large tower clocks, is substantially the same. The figure shows the mechanism of a simple weight-driven timepiece with a pendulum. The frame is made up of two plates that carry the pivots of the various wheels and other moving parts and that are united and spaced by four pillars. The driving weight hangs from a line coiled around a barrel or sprocket, which is raised by turning the winding square or, in some cases, by pulling on the line. The main wheel engages with the centre pinion, on the arbor (axle) of which is also mounted the centre wheel. The front pivot of this wheel and pinion is lengthened to the right of the illustration; it carries the minute hand and part of the gearing necessary to drive the hour hand.
Although it isn’t strictly an “alarm clock,” the Google Home Hub can wake you up in the morning and do so much more. One of the most drastic differences between the Home Hub and other comparable devices is its size; the Home Hub stands at a mere 4.5 inches tall. This makes it small enough to fit comfortably on a nightstand. That small frame is partly due to the lack of a camera, which may be a pro or a con depending on how much you value your privacy. The Home Hub connects to the various Bluetooth-enabled devices you might have throughout your home, including lights, speakers, thermostat, etc. You can set up the Home Hub to respond to your voice commands, or manage devices using the touchscreen. For the purposes of an alarm clock, the Home Hub works terrifically. You can set a normal alarm, or even have the Hub wake you with a specific song from your music library. Given the Hub’s lackluster built-in speakers, however, you may want to connect it to your sound system if you have one. For more details, read our full review.
Inspired by a vintage bicycle wheel, this awesome Oversized Kennan Metal 26.8" Wall Clock lends a touch of industrial chic style to your walls. This factory-chic timekeeper features rusted Arabic numerals, classic black spade hands on a battery-operated rusted gear movement, and gleaming metal wheel spoke accents. Create a factory-chic focal point in your dining room by mounting this piece on the wall over a reclaimed wood sideboard for guests to admire at your next dinner party or add it to...
A wall clock is not only a household necessity, but can also be a stylish home accent piece. Features like analog roman numerals or digital displays can reflect a classic or high-tech style, an oversized silver metal clock can turn a wall into a decor feature, and a beautiful and ornate antique piece can lend a stately touch. Available in a wide variety of other designs and themes, choosing a wall clock to complement your decor can be easy and fun.
Another type of analog clock is the sundial, which tracks the sun continuously, registering the time by the shadow position of its gnomon. Because the sun does not adjust to daylight saving time, users must add an hour during that time. Corrections must also be made for the equation of time, and for the difference between the longitudes of the sundial and of the central meridian of the time zone that is being used (i.e. 15 degrees east of the prime meridian for each hour that the time zone is ahead of GMT). Sundials use some or part of the 24 hour analog dial. There also exist clocks which use a digital display despite having an analog mechanism—these are commonly referred to as flip clocks. Alternative systems have been proposed. For example, the "Twelv" clock indicates the current hour using one of twelve colors, and indicates the minute by showing a proportion of a circular disk, similar to a moon phase.[74]
Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century,[25][26][27] although they are often erroneously credited to Nuremberg watchmaker Peter Henlein (or Henle, or Hele) around 1511.[28][29][30] The earliest existing spring driven clock is the chamber clock given to Phillip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, around 1430, now in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum.[4] Spring power presented clockmakers with a new problem: how to keep the clock movement running at a constant rate as the spring ran down. This resulted in the invention of the stackfreed and the fusee in the 15th century, and many other innovations, down to the invention of the modern going barrel in 1760.
Sounds like a Marvel villain if you say it out loud, doesn’t it? Sonic Alert Vibrating Skull Crusher Clock has a bit of edge to it, and like your metal days, it’s going to wake you up with a thunderous roar. You get 113 decibels of noise, which is basically like a crappy $20.00 blender whizzing right next to your head. Hook up your phone or MP3 player to rock out to your tunes in the morning, should you dare. You get a five-dimmer setting for the red LED display, and the 12-volt bone crusher bed shaker, just to make sure you’re really awake in the morning.
The invention of the mechanical clock in the 13th century initiated a change in timekeeping methods from continuous processes, such as the motion of the gnomon's shadow on a sundial or the flow of liquid in a water clock, to periodic oscillatory processes, such as the swing of a pendulum or the vibration of a quartz crystal,[3][63] which had the potential for more accuracy. All modern clocks use oscillation.
Clockmakers developed their art in various ways. Building smaller clocks was a technical challenge, as was improving accuracy and reliability. Clocks could be impressive showpieces to demonstrate skilled craftsmanship, or less expensive, mass-produced items for domestic use. The escapement in particular was an important factor affecting the clock's accuracy, so many different mechanisms were tried.
Remember a time before everything was digital? Yeah… we don’t either. But a few excellent time-tested products pop up out of the woodwork from time to time, and a traditional dual bell alarm clock does the trick. The hands move silently while you sleep, and buzz like a mother when it’s time to rise and shine. If you’re like us, you’re sometimes bothered by LED flashing you in the face all night. With Peakeep Twin Bell Stereoscopic Clock, you simply touch the button to activate the stereoscopic dial backlight, check the time, and they cop-out for another fifteen minutes. Don’t worry – Peakeep will wake you up.

Many devices can be used to mark passage of time without respect to reference time (time of day, minutes, etc.) and can be useful for measuring duration or intervals. Examples of such duration timers are candle clocks, incense clocks and the hourglass. Both the candle clock and the incense clock work on the same principle wherein the consumption of resources is more or less constant allowing reasonably precise and repeatable estimates of time passages. In the hourglass, fine sand pouring through a tiny hole at a constant rate indicates an arbitrary, predetermined, passage of time. The resource is not consumed but re-used.
Don't settle for a simple wall clock to merely ensure you’re on time. Bring both function and French flair to your space with this oversized 29" oval wall clock. Made from manufactured wood, it showcases a typographic motif in the center that reads "Antiquite de Paris 1887" for a dash of antique inspiration. Classic Roman numerals and spade-style hands help you keep an eye on the hour, while a distressed finish completes the design with well-worn charm. Once you pop in a battery (not...
Set multiple alarms, but not on the same device. The world started relying on their smartphones to wake them up, and it simply doesn’t work. Nothing is better than a good old fashion alarm clock. Here’s the trick: any device in your home that has an alarm feature, set it. That means your stove in the other room, the microwave, your alarm clock, your smartphone, and perhaps a stereo system (if anyone’s still using those). It’s one surefire way to ensure that you’ll freak out all the way to your feet.
Who doesn't love an alarm clock that verbally lets you know it's time to get up and start your day? Step aside, Siri, because "Reminder Rosie" is where it's at. You can easily record up to 25 different alarm-reminders at 6 seconds each. So why not wake up to a recording of your kids saying, "Good morning, Mom!"? (Or maybe you don't want that.) We love how you can turn off the alarm by quickly pressing a button or just saying out loud, "Reminder Off." 
It is undesirable to give someone a clock or (depending on the region) other timepiece as a gift. Traditional superstitions regard this as counting the seconds to the recipient's death. Another common interpretation of this is that the phrase "to give a clock" (simplified Chinese: 送钟; traditional Chinese: 送鐘) in Chinese is pronounced "sòng zhōng" in Mandarin, which is a homophone of a phrase for "terminating" or "attending a funeral" (both can be written as 送終 (traditional) or 送终 (simplified)). Cantonese people consider such a gift as a curse.[79]
An artful accent is all your need to take your entertaining space from every day to eye-catching. While low-slung sofas and a plush shag rug make a fine foundation, you can effortlessly dress it all up by centering this chic clock on the wall above. Pairing brushed aluminum metal with walnut-finished wood panels, this sunburst-inspired piece is brimming with mid-century style. Let it shine solo above an exposed light bulb lamp sitting on an end table so you can watch the time at your pre-dinner...
Defined by its vintage silhouette, this round tabletop clock features two bells up above connected by a slender bridge. Its bold black numbers and classic pierced hands help you keep track of your day, while its alarm ensures you'll wake up on time to start your morning right. This metal design is offered in several bright shades with chipped accents that enhance its antique look. It requires one AA battery (not included).
×