Incorporating clocks into your home design is a way to better keep track of time and can make a unique style statement in your home. Clocks work well in every room of your home, from the living room to the bedroom. You can find wall clocks, mantel clocks, grandfather clocks and outdoor clocks that fit your personal style. Large wall clocks look beautiful in your home and are elegant focal piece in your living room. Make sure that you match the style and texture of your clock to the décor in your home. You can use stylish clocks in your home to accessorize thematic designs and emphasize specific areas of your home.
Small in size but striking in style, this eye-catching wall clock brings a dash of contemporary flair to any arrangement in your home. Showcasing a sunburst silhouette measuring 20" in diameter, this round silver-finished design is crafted with an iron and mirrored frame comprised of black spokes with orb-like accents. A petite glass clock face with sword-style hands sits in the center, allowing you to keep an eye on the hour in any room.
“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.
Synchronous electric clocks do not have an internal oscillator, but count cycles of the 50 or 60 Hz oscillation of the AC power line, which is synchronized by the utility to a precision oscillator. The counting may be done electronically, usually in clocks with digital displays, or, in analog clocks, the AC may drive a synchronous motor which rotates an exact fraction of a revolution for every cycle of the line voltage, and drives the gear train. Although changes in the grid line frequency due to load variations may cause the clock to temporarily gain or lose several seconds during the course of a day, the total number of cycles per 24 hours is maintained extremely accurately by the utility company, so that the clock keeps time accurately over long periods.
About 1450, clockmakers working probably in southern Germany or northern Italy began to make small clocks driven by a spring. These were the first portable timepieces, representing an important landmark in horology. The time-telling dials of these clocks usually had an hour hand only (minute hands did not generally appear until the 1650s) and were exposed to the air; there was normally no form of cover such as a glass until the 17th century, though the mechanism was enclosed, and the cases were made of brass.
About 1450, clockmakers working probably in southern Germany or northern Italy began to make small clocks driven by a spring. These were the first portable timepieces, representing an important landmark in horology. The time-telling dials of these clocks usually had an hour hand only (minute hands did not generally appear until the 1650s) and were exposed to the air; there was normally no form of cover such as a glass until the 17th century, though the mechanism was enclosed, and the cases were made of brass.
Traditional mechanical alarm clocks have one or two bells that ring by means of a mainspring that powers a gear to propel a hammer back and forth between the two bells or between the interior sides of a single bell. In some models, the back encasement of the clock itself acts as the bell. In an electric bell-style alarm clock, the bell is rung by an electromagnetic circuit and armature that turns the circuit on and off repeatedly.[1]
Offer up eye-popping appeal on your walls with this absolutely striking wall clock, the perfect finishing touch to your factory-inspired ensemble. Fashioned from welded steel and featuring a deep black finish, this understated and chic clock lends a touch of simple style to your look, while its 45" diameter ensures it will make a big impact wherever you decide to hang it. Hang it up over trellis-print wallpaper in the living room to let the patterns show through this clock's openwork design, or...
An on-trend take on a retro design, this 12" round wall clock brings a splash of color to any space in your home. This budget-friendly accent showcases a circular face bordered by alternating blocks of green, blue, and red hues with black Roman numerals in the center. Its plastic frame ensures that it’s lightweight and easy to hang, while its metallic pierced hands offer subtle shimmer. This piece does not include batteries.
“The alarm is loud with a lower frequency melody which I like since I have high-frequency hearing loss. Guaranteed to wake anyone up when the alarm goes off which is super important to me, especially if I’m using the alarm clock to wake up to catch a flight. … When the alarm goes off, press the large snooze bar on the top to have the alarm go off again in five minutes. Pressing the snooze bar on top at anytime also lights up the numbers and bars on the clock’s face, but the hands are a bit hard to see in the dark since the hands don’t light up. When the alarm on/off switch is turned to the off position, there’s a cute voice that says ‘Good Morning!’ which brings a smile to start the day. We love this clock so much, we plan to buy more to give as gifts. We’re sure the recipients will love it as much as we do.”
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