Although the mechanisms they use vary, all oscillating clocks, mechanical, digital and atomic, work similarly and can be divided into analogous parts.[64][65][66] They consist of an object that repeats the same motion over and over again, an oscillator, with a precisely constant time interval between each repetition, or 'beat'. Attached to the oscillator is a controller device, which sustains the oscillator's motion by replacing the energy it loses to friction, and converts its oscillations into a series of pulses. The pulses are then counted by some type of counter, and the number of counts is converted into convenient units, usually seconds, minutes, hours, etc. Finally some kind of indicator displays the result in human readable form.
Although it isn’t strictly an “alarm clock,” the Google Home Hub can wake you up in the morning and do so much more. One of the most drastic differences between the Home Hub and other comparable devices is its size; the Home Hub stands at a mere 4.5 inches tall. This makes it small enough to fit comfortably on a nightstand. That small frame is partly due to the lack of a camera, which may be a pro or a con depending on how much you value your privacy. The Home Hub connects to the various Bluetooth-enabled devices you might have throughout your home, including lights, speakers, thermostat, etc. You can set up the Home Hub to respond to your voice commands, or manage devices using the touchscreen. For the purposes of an alarm clock, the Home Hub works terrifically. You can set a normal alarm, or even have the Hub wake you with a specific song from your music library. Given the Hub’s lackluster built-in speakers, however, you may want to connect it to your sound system if you have one. For more details, read our full review.
A standard alarm is often enough to wake most humans, but some people just sleep more deeply than others. For these individuals, the aptly titled SmartShaker 2 is ideal. The thin alarm clock fits comfortably under your pillow and vibrates to wake you. This feature also makes the SmartShaker 2 perfect for those with hearing impairments and couples with different sleep schedules.

You can choose from an analog styled clock to a digital one. Our alarm clocks can vary from old, retro, 1950 styled clocks to modern 2013. Depending on your desire, we have wind up alarm clocks, clocks that do or do not tick, or clocks with or without a built in radio. We have clocks for children, clocks that run on battery, or ones that plug directly into an outlet.


If you've moved away from using a clock completely and instead set an alarm on your phone, consider the SmartShaker by iLuv. The device slides under your pillow and shakes you awake when your phone alarm goes off (it connects wirelessly using bluetooth). You can also have the device sound an audible alarm. The battery lasts a full month before needing to be charged.
In China, a striking clock was devised by the Buddhist monk and inventor Yi Xing (683–727).[5] The Chinese engineers Zhang Sixun and Su Song integrated striking clock mechanisms in astronomical clocks in the 10th and 11th centuries, respectively.[6] A striking clock outside of China was the water-powered clock tower near the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, Syria, which struck once every hour. It was constructed by the Arab engineer al-Kaysarani in 1154. In 1235, an early monumental water-powered alarm clock that "announced the appointed hours of prayer and the time both by day and by night" was completed in the entrance hall of the Mustansiriya Madrasah in Baghdad.[7]
Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]
The timekeeping part of all weight-driven clocks, including large tower clocks, is substantially the same. The figure shows the mechanism of a simple weight-driven timepiece with a pendulum. The frame is made up of two plates that carry the pivots of the various wheels and other moving parts and that are united and spaced by four pillars. The driving weight hangs from a line coiled around a barrel or sprocket, which is raised by turning the winding square or, in some cases, by pulling on the line. The main wheel engages with the centre pinion, on the arbor (axle) of which is also mounted the centre wheel. The front pivot of this wheel and pinion is lengthened to the right of the illustration; it carries the minute hand and part of the gearing necessary to drive the hour hand.
The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]

Instead of sleepily fumbling with the alarm in the mornings trying to find the “off” switch, simply flip this alarm over to the other side. That’s it. Amazon reviewers rave about how minimalist and lightweight it is, perfect for throwing in your carry-on for vacations or business trips. Bonus: It comes in a variety of bright poppy hues, as well as more subdued colors like this modern dark wood.
Rise and shine, rebel. This Stormtrooper comes to you, bringing news of a peace proposal with the empire. See those bright numbers displayed brilliantly on its LCD screen? That means it's time to go. Adjustable arms point toward the door, beckoning for you to make haste. But before you head off to save the galaxy, you might want to turn your Lego alarm clock off first. Plus, if you're a Darth Vader fan, you can get this alarm clock with him, too!

Besides the Chinese astronomical clock of Su Song in 1088 mentioned above, in Europe there were the clocks constructed by Richard of Wallingford in St Albans by 1336, and by Giovanni de Dondi in Padua from 1348 to 1364. They no longer exist, but detailed descriptions of their design and construction survive,[22][23] and modern reproductions have been made.[23] They illustrate how quickly the theory of the mechanical clock had been translated into practical constructions, and also that one of the many impulses to their development had been the desire of astronomers to investigate celestial phenomena.
The glossy finish reflects just enough light to show off the clock’s clean lines and rounded edges, and individuals who prefer a little bit of background ambiance throughout the night will enjoy the gentle ticking. The clock is also ultra-compact, so it won’t crowd your nightstand. The off button located on the top quickly silences the old-school beeping, too, but unfortunately, the device lacks a snooze button.

In the 13th century, Al-Jazari, an engineer from Mesopotamia (lived 1136–1206) who worked for Artuqid king of Diyar-Bakr, Nasir al-Din, made numerous clocks of all shapes and sizes. A book on his work described 50 mechanical devices in 6 categories, including water clocks. The most reputed clocks included the Elephant, Scribe and Castle clocks, all of which have been successfully reconstructed. As well as telling the time, these grand clocks were symbols of status, grandeur and wealth of the Urtuq State.[citation needed]
The Howard Miller Braxton 625-628 Wall Clock is finished in Black Coffee on select hardwoods and veneers. The white dial features black Arabic numerals and minute track. The polished silver-tone bezel matches the brushed silver finished pendulum bob. The wooden pendulum stick matches the color of the case. The single chime quartz movement plays the Westminster chime on the hour and gives an hour count. One Year Warranty and Free Shipping. 

This 32-1/2" large wall clock's dial is aged with black Arabic numerals, and features an antique pendulum visible through peep hole. Aged black minute and hour hands with a red second hand complete the look. Lightly distressed finish in Hampton Cherry make this with glass crystal. A handsome large wall clocks with pendulum. Quartz, battery operated movement. One Year Warranty.
In order to shut off this loud alarm, you have to actually get out of bed and stand on the rug for three seconds. But if you find yourself cheating your alarm by crawling back into bed after those few seconds, you can extend the alarm for up to 30 seconds, ensuring you’ll be much more awake once the blood starts flowing to the other parts of your body.
“This was a gift for my elderly, cognitively impaired mother. She was very often confused as to which day it was, the time of day, etc. She would show up at appointments on the wrong day, or think it was morning when it was evening. This clock is fantastic! It has made such a difference. Now she always knows what day and time it is. The clock is also very nice-looking. This was an excellent purchase and highly recommended. I can’t say enough good things about it.”
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