Certainly not just for telling time, wall clocks are perfect for adding artful appeal to your kitchen wall or acting as a focal point above the living room mantel. Take this one for example: crafted from metal, its frame features an openwork design and a black finish for a look that fits right into traditional abodes and modern farmhouses alike. Measures about 30'' in diameter. Requires one AA battery to operate.
Defined by its vintage silhouette, this round tabletop clock features two bells up above connected by a slender bridge. Its bold black numbers and classic pierced hands help you keep track of your day, while its alarm ensures you'll wake up on time to start your morning right. This metal design is offered in several bright shades with chipped accents that enhance its antique look. It requires one AA battery (not included).
Some clocks, called 'flip clocks', have digital displays that work mechanically. The digits are painted on sheets of material which are mounted like the pages of a book. Once a minute, a page is turned over to reveal the next digit. These displays are usually easier to read in brightly lit conditions than LCDs or LEDs. Also, they do not go back to 12:00 after a power interruption. Flip clocks generally do not have electronic mechanisms. Usually, they are driven by AC-synchronous motors.
This oversized aged metal wall clock is 31.5" square and is finished in aged white and gray. The aged dial with aged black Roman numerals and aged black spade hour and minute hands sits behind a glass crystal and is surrounded by a formed metal bezel finished in aged white and gray. Quartz, battery-operated movement requires one AA sized battery (not included). One year warranty and Free Shipping.
Small in size but striking in style, this eye-catching wall clock brings a dash of contemporary flair to any arrangement in your home. Showcasing a sunburst silhouette measuring 20" in diameter, this round silver-finished design is crafted with an iron and mirrored frame comprised of black spokes with orb-like accents. A petite glass clock face with sword-style hands sits in the center, allowing you to keep an eye on the hour in any room.
There’s a lot of science when it comes to sleeping, and there’s never a short supply of sleep-related tests going on. One of our favorite electronic brands here on Gear Hungry has made the most effective clock (in our humble opinion), and it’s the #8 pick: Philips Wake-Up HF3505. Slow light build mimics the sunrise, and gently pulls you out of a sleep-like trance before hitting you with some serious sound. Between price, effectiveness, and the fact that we didn’t have to chase it around the room (sorry Clocky, we’re not morning people), we absolutely loved this one.

In a clock driven by a weight or a spring, the power is first transmitted by the main, or great, wheel. This engages with a pinion (a gear with a small number of teeth designed to mesh with a larger wheel), whose arbor (a turning rod to which gears are attached) is attached to the second wheel that, in its turn, engages with the next pinion, and so on, down through the train to the escapement. The gear ratios are such that one arbor, usually the second or third, rotates once an hour and can be used to carry the minute hand. A simple 12-to-1 gearing, known as the motion work, gives the necessary step-down ratio to drive the hour hand. The spring or weight is fitted with a mechanism so it can be rewound when necessary, and the arbor carrying the minute hand is provided with a simple slipping clutch that allows the hands to be set to the correct time.

This Alarm Clock has many features that make it an excellent addition to your nightstand, work station, kitchen counter or end table. The first thing that separates this Alarm Clock from the rest are the two, easily accessible USB ports located directly on the front of the clock. These ports are fast charging and are perfect for your phone or tablet. Second, the illuminated digits are bright and easy to read in the dark. If you find them too bright when you are trying to fall asleep there is a...
c. 1350–1400, Middle English clokke, clok, cloke, from Middle Dutch clocke (“bell, clock”), from Old Northern French cloque (“bell”), from Medieval Latin clocca, probably of Celtic origin, from Proto-Celtic *klokkos (“bell”) (compare Welsh cloch, Irish clog), from Proto-Indo-European *klēg-, *klōg-. Related to Old English clucge, Saterland Frisian Klokke (“bell; clock”), Low German Klock (“bell, clock”), German Glocke, Swedish klocka. Related to laugh.

About 1581 Galileo noticed the characteristic timekeeping property of the pendulum. The Dutch astronomer and physicist Christiaan Huygens was responsible for the practical application of the pendulum as a time controller in clocks from 1656 onward. Huygens’s invention brought about a great increase in the importance and extent of clock making. Clocks, weight-driven and with short pendulums, were encased in wood and made to hang on the wall, but these new eight-day wall clocks had very heavy weights, and many fell off weak plaster walls and were destroyed. The next step was to extend the case to the floor, and the grandfather clock was born. In 1670 the long, or seconds, pendulum was introduced by English clock makers with the anchor escapement.
“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
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