Add a dash of visual intrigue and stylish sophistication to your ensemble with this eye-catching wall clock, the perfect piece for your well-curated aesthetic. Hang it up on a deep blue or charcoal-toned wall in the living room to complement its shimmering silver finish and hard-lined metal design, then offset its striking starburst silhouette by arranging a console table below with glossy ceramic vases and simple metal picture frames. Curating a midcentury-modern aesthetic in your space? Lean...
Brimming with an antiqued appeal, this clean-lined wood and glass wall clock brings function and flair to your home. Its distressed details pair perfectly with reclaimed teak wood accents while its neutral color palettes blend effortlessly into any monochromatic look. Add this piece to the den to bring the traditional flair to a cozy coastal arrangement, then pair it with woven rattan furniture and driftwood decor for a complementing look. Round out the room with a hand-woven jute rug to define...

Small in size but striking in style, this eye-catching wall clock brings a dash of contemporary flair to any arrangement in your home. Showcasing a sunburst silhouette measuring 20" in diameter, this round silver-finished design is crafted with an iron and mirrored frame comprised of black spokes with orb-like accents. A petite glass clock face with sword-style hands sits in the center, allowing you to keep an eye on the hour in any room.
Molded by mid-century modern style, this 38" wall clock brings a bit of bold flair to any space in your home. Its generous size helps it grab glances (and compliments!) from guests, while its open and numberless design gives it a minimalist feel. Crafted from metal, this round silhouette sports a gold finish with silver-finished hands in the center for subtle contrast. Two AA batteries (not included) are required to operate.
A: There’s always going to be a sleep-related study going on, but you might be surprised to find that it’s not a one-size-fits-all answer. There’s about 1% of the population, known as The Sleepless Elite, who don’t need to clock-in a bunch of hours with their pillows. Some of us just run better off of less sleep, even if we don’t realize it right away. There’s such a thing as oversleeping, too, so how do you really know your specific sleep needs?
“This little beauty works great. I bought it when the alarm on my mobile phone began to intermittently fail me. This little travel clock is beautiful in retro seafoam green and great for travel because its bright color ensures that you will never miss picking it up from your hotel nightstand at checkout. There is a faint, pleasant ticking, the hands glow in the dark, and the nightlight button is bright when needed. The pop-up alarm button is firm and works well though I am learning not to accidentally press it and turn the alarm off when picking up the clock. Overall, a fantastic alarm clock.”

This 77th Anniversary wall clock offers both substance and charm. Our most popular westminster wall clock with chimes and pendulum. The gently scalloped arched bonnet is supported by reeded columns with artfully turned caps. Behind the opening door, the off-white dial features black Arabic numerals, black serpentine hour and minute hands. A polished brass finished lyre and bezel provide the perfect accents to the warm wood case. Finished in Golden Oak on select hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, dual chime movement plays Westminster or Ave Maria chimes, and features volume control and automatic nighttime chime shut-off option.


Keep time in style with this traditional tabletop clock, a great way to round out a decorative vignette while adding essential function. Crafted from wood and metal, this circular design sits atop a curved base and pairs an antique dial with a deep red finish. The glass-inlaid clock face sports glow-in-the-dark hands, so you can check the time in the wee hours and early evening, while a quartz movement keeps this design tickin’ and tockin’. Requires a battery.
For convenience, distance, telephony or blindness, auditory clocks present the time as sounds. The sound is either spoken natural language, (e.g. "The time is twelve thirty-five"), or as auditory codes (e.g. number of sequential bell rings on the hour represents the number of the hour like the bell, Big Ben). Most telecommunication companies also provide a speaking clock service as well.
If you've moved away from using a clock completely and instead set an alarm on your phone, consider the SmartShaker by iLuv. The device slides under your pillow and shakes you awake when your phone alarm goes off (it connects wirelessly using bluetooth). You can also have the device sound an audible alarm. The battery lasts a full month before needing to be charged.
Auditory and projection clocks can be used by people who are blind or have limited vision. There are also clocks for the blind that have displays that can be read by using the sense of touch. Some of these are similar to normal analog displays, but are constructed so the hands can be felt without damaging them. Another type is essentially digital, and uses devices that use a code such as Braille to show the digits so that they can be felt with the fingertips.
In 1675, Huygens and Robert Hooke invented the spiral balance spring, or the hairspring, designed to control the oscillating speed of the balance wheel. This crucial advance finally made accurate pocket watches possible. The great English clockmaker, Thomas Tompion, was one of the first to use this mechanism successfully in his pocket watches, and he adopted the minute hand which, after a variety of designs were trialled, eventually stabilised into the modern-day configuration.[40] The rack and snail striking mechanism for striking clocks, was introduced during the 17th century and had distinct advantages over the 'countwheel' (or 'locking plate') mechanism. During the 20th century there was a common misconception that Edward Barlow invented rack and snail striking. In fact, his invention was connected with a repeating mechanism employing the rack and snail.[41] The repeating clock, that chimes the number of hours (or even minutes) was invented by either Quare or Barlow in 1676. George Graham invented the deadbeat escapement for clocks in 1720.
“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
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