Disclosure: This post is brought to you by the Insider Picks team. We highlight products and services you might find interesting. If you buy them, we get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. We frequently receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback. Email us at insiderpicks@businessinsider.com.

A vintaged take on traditional style, this alarm clock brings time-honored style to any space, without breaking the bank. Crafted from metal, this analog alarm clock showcasing a round face sitting atop a molded base. Giving this piece a distinctive look is an antiqued face, outfitted with glow-in-the-dark hour and minute hands. Black and neutral hues round out this clock's color palette, accented with distressed details. Measured at under half-a-foot tall and wide, this lightweight clock is...
The gorgeous combination of contemporary and modern accents results in the Bai Design 10" Gotham Designer Wall Clock. A simplistic design, the wall clock will exemplify the decor of your living room with its simple and subtle style. Add a dash of elegance to the walls of any room with this exquisite wall clock. Carved out plastic and glass, the wall clock follows the footsteps of modern architecture. The top and base materials are made out of a strong spray painted ABS bezel frame which...
The most accurate mechanical timekeeper is the Shortt pendulum clock; it makes use of the movement described above for electric master clock systems. The Shortt pendulum clock consists of two separate clocks, one of which synchronizes the other. The timekeeping element is a pendulum that swings freely, except that once every half minute it receives an impulse from a gently falling lever. This lever is released by an electrical signal transmitted from its slave clock. After the impulse has been sent, a synchronizing signal is transmitted back to the slave clock that ensures that the impulse to the free pendulum will be released exactly a half minute later than the previous impulse. The pendulum swings in a sealed box in which the air is kept at a constant, low pressure. Shortt clocks in observatories are kept in a room, usually a basement, where the temperature remains nearly constant, and under these conditions they can maintain the correct time to within a few thousandths of a second per day.
The Howard Miller Brassworks II 625-569 is an over-sized, large wall clock showcases a distressed red dial with metal outer frame finished in antique black with brass undertones and highlights. The dial features aged iron-finished gears viewed through an open center. The spade hour and minute hands are finished in antique black with brass undertones and an antique black-finished gear in the center rotates. Quartz, battery-operated movement requires 1 AA battery. One year warranty and Free Shipping.
Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]
While it’s not to be used in lieu of an alarm clock, this handy app will aggravate the hell out of you until you’re awake. You have to vigorously shake your phone for the duration of time previously set, or it’ll keep going. Pair this with sixty seconds after your new alarm clock going off, and you’ll throw yourself into a frenzy that you’ll need to power through to get out of. By that point, you’re already up.
An on-trend take on a retro design, this 12" round wall clock brings a splash of color to any space in your home. This budget-friendly accent showcases a circular face bordered by alternating blocks of green, blue, and red hues with black Roman numerals in the center. Its plastic frame ensures that it’s lightweight and easy to hang, while its metallic pierced hands offer subtle shimmer. This piece does not include batteries.
This looks like a Death Star droid out of a Star Wars movie, but it gets the job done with the tricks up its sleeve. Charge your phone and your tablet at the same time with two power outlets and two USB ports. The alarm clock feature is simple, and while it also projects your tunes via Bluetooth audio, it comes with a surge protector. That’s right; no freak lightning storm is allowed to hold you back. CubieBlue Charging Bluetooth Speaker is still going to work when you plug it back in (even if you threw it across the room).
Never squint to see what time it is again, especially when you're waking up 20 times in the middle of the night to, you know, see exactly what time it is. We love the projection feature that displays the time on your wall or ceiling for easy viewing. Plus, it'll even toss up the temperature — so you'll already know what you should wear to work before you even get out of bed.
“Great alarm clock for the price. Gigantic numbers for my old eyes. Very basic, easy to set, just what I wanted. Alarm is loud even on low [with] an awful sound that would wake the dead. But that sound makes me get right up, so it does exactly what it’s supposed to do. If you want a soft gentle caress to wake you, get something else, but this is a good alarm and easy to use.”
×