Stay on schedule and charge a range of devices with this innovative iHome dual-alarm clock. Place your compatible smartphone on top of the Qi-certified device for swift wireless charging, or plug your phone into the clock’s handy powered USB port. This iHome dual-alarm clock incorporates NFC technology, so you can connect an array of Bluetooth-enabled devices with a quick touch.
“The alarm is loud with a lower frequency melody which I like since I have high-frequency hearing loss. Guaranteed to wake anyone up when the alarm goes off which is super important to me, especially if I’m using the alarm clock to wake up to catch a flight. … When the alarm goes off, press the large snooze bar on the top to have the alarm go off again in five minutes. Pressing the snooze bar on top at anytime also lights up the numbers and bars on the clock’s face, but the hands are a bit hard to see in the dark since the hands don’t light up. When the alarm on/off switch is turned to the off position, there’s a cute voice that says ‘Good Morning!’ which brings a smile to start the day. We love this clock so much, we plan to buy more to give as gifts. We’re sure the recipients will love it as much as we do.”

Don't worry, Zeus didn't show up to your home, but you'll certainly feel that way when waking up to this unit's thunderous, 113-decibel buzzing. Fair warning: It's definitely loud, so it's a good pick only if you're a heavy, heavy sleeper. Just in case the noise somehow isn't enough to pry you out of bed, this alarm clock flashes multiple bright red LEDs and comes with a bed shaker that'll really get you going. Trust us, if that sensory overload doesn't get the job done, nothing will.
The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–348 BC) was said to possess a large water clock with an unspecified alarm signal similar to the sound of a water organ; he used it at night, possibly for signaling the beginning of his lectures at dawn (Athenaeus 4.174c).[2] The Hellenistic engineer and inventor Ctesibius (fl. 285–222 BC) fitted his clepsydras with dial and pointer for indicating the time, and added elaborate "alarm systems, which could be made to drop pebbles on a gong, or blow trumpets (by forcing bell-jars down into water and taking the compressed air through a beating reed) at pre-set times" (Vitruv 11.11).[3]
This dual tone wall clock features a handsome Rustic Cherry finish with a contrasting Vintage Umber inset panel. The wood stick moving pendulum features a spun brass-finished bob. Beneath a convex glass crystal, the dial features a two color wood-tone dial with gold Arabic numerals and aged brass-tone spade hands. Finished in distressed Rustic Cherry on select hardwoods and veneers. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement.

A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The position of a ship at sea could be determined with reasonable accuracy if a navigator could refer to a clock that lost or gained less than about 10 seconds per day. This clock could not contain a pendulum, which would be virtually useless on a rocking ship. In 1714, the British government offered large financial rewards to the value of 20,000 pounds,[42] for anyone who could determine longitude accurately. John Harrison, who dedicated his life to improving the accuracy of his clocks, later received considerable sums under the Longitude Act.
Here at the Strategist, we like to think of ourselves as crazy (in the good way) about the stuff we buy (like pillows), but as much as we’d like to, we can’t try everything. Which is why we have People’s Choice, in which we find the best-reviewed (that’s four-to-five-star reviews and lots of ‘em) products and single out the most convincing. While we’ve tried to find the nicest-sounding alarm clocks and ended up with picks for the best alarm clock and a voice-controlled alarm clock, we wanted to see what other ways to wake up were out there. So we found the best alarm clocks on Amazon, according to hyperenthusiastic reviewers. (Note that reviews have been edited for length and clarity.)
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