A water-powered cogwheel clock was created in China in AD 725 by Yi Xing and Liang Lingzan. This is not considered an escapement mechanism clock as it was unidirectional, the Song dynasty polymath and genius Su Song (1020–1101) incorporated it into his monumental innovation of the astronomical clock-tower of Kaifeng in 1088.[19][page needed] His astronomical clock and rotating armillary sphere still relied on the use of either flowing water during the spring, summer, autumn seasons and liquid mercury during the freezing temperature of winter (i.e. hydraulics). A mercury clock, described in the Libros del saber, a Spanish work from 1277 consisting of translations and paraphrases of Arabic works, is sometimes quoted as evidence for Muslim knowledge of a mechanical clock. A mercury-powered cogwheel clock was created by Ibn Khalaf al-Muradi[20][21]
A well-made large wall clock that looks good and runs smoothly can add charm and functionality to any space. For a fresh take on the traditional clock, consider this eye-catching design... Introducing Madera Wall Clock by Umbra This beautiful, modern clock has a wood veneer dial, aluminum bezel, and glass lens. Inspired by modern wristwatches Madera is intended to serve as a finishing touch for any space. Featuring a silent sweeping quartz mechanism, this wall clocks battery operated design...
About 1581 Galileo noticed the characteristic timekeeping property of the pendulum. The Dutch astronomer and physicist Christiaan Huygens was responsible for the practical application of the pendulum as a time controller in clocks from 1656 onward. Huygens’s invention brought about a great increase in the importance and extent of clock making. Clocks, weight-driven and with short pendulums, were encased in wood and made to hang on the wall, but these new eight-day wall clocks had very heavy weights, and many fell off weak plaster walls and were destroyed. The next step was to extend the case to the floor, and the grandfather clock was born. In 1670 the long, or seconds, pendulum was introduced by English clock makers with the anchor escapement.
This special 82nd Anniversary Edition Contemporary wall clock is one our more popular pendulum chiming wall clocks and features a white dial with black Roman numerals and a brushed nickel bezel. A spun nickel pendulum bob is suspended in front of a mirrored back. Finished in Black Satin. One Year Warranty. Quartz, triple chime Harmonic movement plays your choice of Westminster, Ave Maria, or Bim-Bam chimes with volume control and automatic nighttime chime shut-off option.
Bolter, David J. Turing's Man: Western Culture in the Computer Age. The University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill, N.C. (1984). ISBN 0-8078-4108-0 pbk. Very good, readable summary of the role of "the clock" in its setting the direction of philosophic movement for the "Western World". Cf. picture on p. 25 showing the verge and foliot. Bolton derived the picture from Macey, p. 20.
Emerson alarm clock radio features relaxing sounds that help you unwind and fall asleep faster. Perfect for bedrooms, baby nurseries, spas, salons, apartments, offices and anywhere where unwanted disturbing or intrusive noise is a problem. The noise sound machine can help block out distractions and promote relaxation prior to sleep to provide you with a more peaceful, restful night sleep. Sounds include ocean side, rain, rain forest, summer night, tide and noise. With features such as a...
In a master clock system, electricity is used to give direct impulses to the pendulum, which in turn causes the clock’s gear train to move, or to lift a lever after it has imparted an impulse to the pendulum. In various modern master clocks the pendulum operates a light count wheel that turns through the pitch of one tooth every double swing and is arranged to release a lever every half minute. This lever gives an impulse to the pendulum and is then restored to its original position by an electromagnet. The pulse of current that operates the electromagnet can also be transmitted to a series of distant dials, or slave clocks, advancing the hands of each through the space of a half minute. Thus, a master clock can control scores of dials in a large group of buildings, as well as such other apparatus as time recorders and sirens.
The ancient Greek philosopher Plato (428–348 BC) was said to possess a large water clock with an unspecified alarm signal similar to the sound of a water organ; he used it at night, possibly for signaling the beginning of his lectures at dawn (Athenaeus 4.174c).[2] The Hellenistic engineer and inventor Ctesibius (fl. 285–222 BC) fitted his clepsydras with dial and pointer for indicating the time, and added elaborate "alarm systems, which could be made to drop pebbles on a gong, or blow trumpets (by forcing bell-jars down into water and taking the compressed air through a beating reed) at pre-set times" (Vitruv 11.11).[3]
You can choose from an analog styled clock to a digital one. Our alarm clocks can vary from old, retro, 1950 styled clocks to modern 2013. Depending on your desire, we have wind up alarm clocks, clocks that do or do not tick, or clocks with or without a built in radio. We have clocks for children, clocks that run on battery, or ones that plug directly into an outlet.
The British had predominated in watch manufacture for much of the 17th and 18th centuries, but maintained a system of production that was geared towards high quality products for the elite.[44] Although there was an attempt to modernise clock manufacture with mass production techniques and the application of duplicating tools and machinery by the British Watch Company in 1843, it was in the United States that this system took off. In 1816, Eli Terry and some other Connecticut clockmakers developed a way of mass-producing clocks by using interchangeable parts.[45] Aaron Lufkin Dennison started a factory in 1851 in Massachusetts that also used interchangeable parts, and by 1861 was running a successful enterprise incorporated as the Waltham Watch Company.[46][47]
This metal wire case wall clock is finished in antique black with antique gold highlights. The pendulum bob, with matching finish, is an open circle, suspended on a metal pendulum. A black bezel surrounds the convex acrylic crystal. The dial features an antique Antique Red background with gold Arabic numerals and Antique gold spade hands. Quartz, non-chiming battery operated movement. One Year Warranty.
You can set the clock to release aromatherapeutic scents in tandem with the light, choosing from four different fragrances that come with the clock or using your own essential oil blend. Fifteen minutes before your wake-up time, it'll also emit your choice of soft nature noises. The cycle ends with a chiming noise that gradually grows in volume to ensure that even the heaviest sleepers will wake up.
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Similar to our #8 selection, this app uses a gradual brightness increase to slowly wake you out of your sleep, before laying down the hammer and buzzing to wake you up. If you’re waking up angry or abruptly (more on this in a moment), then this is the perfect trick to keep ahead. Just ensure your alarm clock also has a USB charging slot to keep your phone nearby. This works well if you position it differently than your gradual light alarm clock, as if you’re getting two sunrises instead of one.


In China, a striking clock was devised by the Buddhist monk and inventor Yi Xing (683–727).[5] The Chinese engineers Zhang Sixun and Su Song integrated striking clock mechanisms in astronomical clocks in the 10th and 11th centuries, respectively.[6] A striking clock outside of China was the water-powered clock tower near the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus, Syria, which struck once every hour. It was constructed by the Arab engineer al-Kaysarani in 1154. In 1235, an early monumental water-powered alarm clock that "announced the appointed hours of prayer and the time both by day and by night" was completed in the entrance hall of the Mustansiriya Madrasah in Baghdad.[7]

A: There’s always going to be a sleep-related study going on, but you might be surprised to find that it’s not a one-size-fits-all answer. There’s about 1% of the population, known as The Sleepless Elite, who don’t need to clock-in a bunch of hours with their pillows. Some of us just run better off of less sleep, even if we don’t realize it right away. There’s such a thing as oversleeping, too, so how do you really know your specific sleep needs?
Some water clock designs were developed independently and some knowledge was transferred through the spread of trade. Pre-modern societies do not have the same precise timekeeping requirements that exist in modern industrial societies, where every hour of work or rest is monitored, and work may start or finish at any time regardless of external conditions. Instead, water clocks in ancient societies were used mainly for astrological reasons. These early water clocks were calibrated with a sundial. While never reaching the level of accuracy of a modern timepiece, the water clock was the most accurate and commonly used timekeeping device for millennia, until it was replaced by the more accurate pendulum clock in 17th-century Europe.
The naysayers might note that your cell phone alarm can already be set to vibrate, so why not just slip your smartphone under your pillowcase? All sanitary arguments aside, the SmartShaker 2 vibrates much more powerfully than a standard smartphone (three times more to be exact). The SmartShaker 2 also connects to your smartphone via Bluetooth and incorporates a functional, easy-to-use app that’s available for both Android and iOS devices. You can even set up to 10 different alarms and choose from an array of options, just in case you want an audio alarm as well as a vibration. After all, sometimes the snooze struggle is all too real.
Analog clocks display time with an analog clock face, which consists of a round dial with the numbers 1 through 12, the hours in the day, around the outside. The hours are indicated with an hour hand, which makes two revolutions in a day, while the minutes are indicated by a minute hand, which makes one revolution per hour. In mechanical clocks a gear train drives the hands; in electronic clocks the circuit produces pulses every second which drive a stepper motor and gear train, which move the hands.
Any expansion or contraction of the rod caused by changes of temperature will affect the timekeeping of a pendulum; e.g., a pendulum clock with a steel rod will lose one second a day for a rise in temperature of approximately 4 °F (2.2 °C). For accurate timekeeping, the length of the pendulum must be kept as nearly constant as possible. This may be done in several ways, some of which use the differing coefficients of expansion (the amount of expansion per degree change in temperature) of different metals to obtain a cancelling-out effect. In one popular compensation method, the bob consists of a glass or metal jar containing a suitable amount of mercury. The gridiron pendulum employs rods of different metal, usually brass and steel, while in the zinc-iron tube the pendulum rod is made of concentric tubes of zinc and iron. An improved method, however, is to make the pendulum rod from a special alloy called Invar. This material has such a small coefficient of expansion that small changes of temperature have a negligible effect and can easily be compensated for if required.

c. 1350–1400, Middle English clokke, clok, cloke, from Middle Dutch clocke (“bell, clock”), from Old Northern French cloque (“bell”), from Medieval Latin clocca, probably of Celtic origin, from Proto-Celtic *klokkos (“bell”) (compare Welsh cloch, Irish clog), from Proto-Indo-European *klēg-, *klōg-. Related to Old English clucge, Saterland Frisian Klokke (“bell; clock”), Low German Klock (“bell, clock”), German Glocke, Swedish klocka. Related to laugh.
“Great little dual alarm clock. Super easy to set the two alarms. Easy to use. It has a night light feature with adjustable dimmer, which is great. You can adjust the display completely dark so you don’t see the numbers. Then you can just hit the snooze button when the alarm is not ringing and the display lights up. It’s powered only by 3 AA batteries: no electric cord, no USB, nothing that you need. If you need a fancy alarm clock that sprays water in your face, this is not it.”
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