Mixing modern minimalism with industrial influence, this round 28" wall clock is as much a decorative accent as it is a practical timepiece. Crafted from metal, it showcases sizable Roman numerals and small spade-style hands to help you keep an eye on the hour. Its black and gold finish gives it an antiqued appearance, while its open design ensures it won’t overwhelm your arrangement. This piece requires two AA batteries (not included) to operate.
This color-changing option features a radio, built-in wake-up tones, Bluetooth music streaming (so you can wake up to your favorite playlist), and USB-charging capacity to keep your phone juiced. You can preset two alarms, cycle through colors, and snooze, and even use the alarm clock's speakerphone and microphone functions to answer phone calls from paired devices. Basically, this clock does everything except your laundry.
The returned instants from Clock work on a time-scale that ignores leap seconds, as described in Instant. If the implementation wraps a source that provides leap second information, then a mechanism should be used to "smooth" the leap second. The Java Time-Scale mandates the use of UTC-SLS, however clock implementations may choose how accurate they are with the time-scale so long as they document how they work. Implementations are therefore not required to actually perform the UTC-SLS slew or to otherwise be aware of leap seconds.
"Stripe Clock" is a modern metallic design created by the artist, Belle. Measured at 24 inches on each side, this metal art is made from a single sheet of metal expertly grinded and tinted and made in to a functional clock. It is mainly characterized by the bright stripe in the middle of the sheet of metal. Each stroke and grind pattern on this piece accentuates the beauty of the plain sheet of metal. The glimmer coming from the shallow grinds are like street lights illuminating the city in the...
A: From personal experience, a firsthand account of an insomniac, if you will, Sleep Sense really did the trick. There’s a million reasons why you might not be sleeping, and while most of the time it’s stress or something of the sort, it could also be a deficiency of certain vitamins and minerals. Sleep Sense comes with melatonin, magnesium, and other ingredients, all designed to help you sleep, without the fear of becoming addicted or dependent on them. It took about three years to get over insomnia (if the TV is on, I still can’t sleep), but after enough trial and error, and a good dose of Sleep Sense, it did the trick. I stopped dreading the alarm clock so much.
In atomic clocks the controller is an evacuated microwave cavity attached to a microwave oscillator controlled by a microprocessor. A thin gas of caesium atoms is released into the cavity where they are exposed to microwaves. A laser measures how many atoms have absorbed the microwaves, and an electronic feedback control system called a phase-locked loop tunes the microwave oscillator until it is at the frequency that causes the atoms to vibrate and absorb the microwaves. Then the microwave signal is divided by digital counters to become the clock signal.[72]
The Homedics SoundSpa Digital FM Tabletop Clock with time projection gives you the power to create a soothing, relaxing sleep environment. Choose from eight peaceful relaxation sounds including ocean, white noise, brook, rainforest, thunder, rain, fan, campfire, or simply switch on the radio. The SoundSpa Digital FM Tabletop Clock comes with the option of time projection and a soothing blue light.
A silent instrument missing such a striking mechanism has traditionally been known as a timepiece.[5] In general usage today, a "clock" refers to any device for measuring and displaying the time. Watches and other timepieces that can be carried on one's person are often distinguished from clocks.[6] Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century. During the 15th and 16th centuries, clockmaking flourished. The next development in accuracy occurred after 1656 with the invention of the pendulum clock. A major stimulus to improving the accuracy and reliability of clocks was the importance of precise time-keeping for navigation. The electric clock was patented in 1840. The development of electronics in the 20th century led to clocks with no clockwork parts at all.
If the last thing you do before closing your eyes for the night is pick up your cell phone to set the alarm, how likely is it that you're just going to do that one thing, then set the phone down on the nightstand? Admit it, you're probably going to check your Instagram, send a text or two, play just one more round of your favorite game, or surf the web.
The piezoelectric properties of crystalline quartz were discovered by Jacques and Pierre Curie in 1880.[49][50] The first crystal oscillator was invented in 1917 by Alexander M. Nicholson after which, the first quartz crystal oscillator was built by Walter G. Cady in 1921.[2] In 1927 the first quartz clock was built by Warren Marrison and J. W. Horton at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Canada.[51][2] The following decades saw the development of quartz clocks as precision time measurement devices in laboratory settings—the bulky and delicate counting electronics, built with vacuum tubes, limited their practical use elsewhere. The National Bureau of Standards (now NIST) based the time standard of the United States on quartz clocks from late 1929 until the 1960s, when it changed to atomic clocks.[52] In 1969, Seiko produced the world's first quartz wristwatch, the Astron.[53] Their inherent accuracy and low cost of production resulted in the subsequent proliferation of quartz clocks and watches.[49]
The timekeeping element of a quartz clock consists of a ring of quartz about 2.5 inches (63.5 mm) in diameter, suspended by threads and enclosed in a heat-insulated chamber. Electrodes are attached to the surfaces of the ring and connected to an electrical circuit in such a manner as to sustain oscillations. Since the frequency of vibration, 100,000-hertz, is too high for convenient time measurement, it is reduced by a process known as frequency division or demultiplication and applied to a synchronous motor connected to a clock dial through mechanical gearing. If a 100,000 hertz frequency, for example, is subjected to a combined electrical and mechanical gearing reduction of 6,000,000 to 1, then the second hand of the synchronous clock will make exactly one rotation in 60 seconds. The vibrations are so regular that the maximum error of an observatory quartz-crystal clock is only a few ten-thousandths of a second per day, equivalent to an error of one second every 10 years.
The primary purpose of a clock is to display the time. Clocks may also have the facility to make a loud alert signal at a specified time, typically to waken a sleeper at a preset time; they are referred to as alarm clocks. The alarm may start at a low volume and become louder, or have the facility to be switched off for a few minutes then resume. Alarm clocks with visible indicators are sometimes used to indicate to children too young to read the time that the time for sleep has finished; they are sometimes called training clocks.
Hopefully, you don’t have sensitive eyes. Get ready to have over 100 lumens pull up on you like the flashlight of a police officer on a Saturday night. One thing’s for sure—it’s going to wake you up, and keep you up. This is a nature sounds alarm clock to boot, so you’ll feel like you’re in the middle of the meadow when it goes off. A very bright meadow. NakaLight Wake Up will gradually light up a half hour before you awaken to ease you out of sleep.

Bring bold, eye-popping appeal to your walls with this absolutely striking wall clock, the perfect finishing touch to your industrial-inspired ensemble. Crafted from welded steel and featuring a deep black finish, this understated and chic clock lends a touch of simple style to your look, while its 39" diameter ensures it will make a big impact wherever you decide to hang it. Hang it up over muted stripe wallpaper in the living room to let the patterns show through this clock's openwork design...
Alarm clocks, like almost all other consumer goods in the United States, ceased production in the spring of 1942, as the factories which made them were converted over to war work during World War II, but they were one of the first consumer items to resume manufacture for civilian use, in November 1944.[13][14] By that time, a critical shortage of alarm clocks had developed due to older clocks wearing out or breaking down. Workers were late for, or missed completely, their scheduled shifts in jobs critical to the war effort.[14] In a pooling arrangement overseen by the Office of Price Administration, several clock companies were allowed to start producing new clocks, some of which were continuations of pre-war designs, and some of which were new designs, thus becoming among the first "postwar" consumer goods to be made, before the war had even ended.[15][16] The price of these "emergency" clocks was, however, still strictly regulated by the Office of Price Administration.[14]
This farmhouse wall clock measures 30 in. across This farmhouse wall clock measures 30 in. across the face and features horizontal cedar wood slats a white distressed finish hand painted black Roman numerals in a Poster Condensed font and an inner accent ring with individual hour marks. It includes a high torque quartz movement antique-style spade hands and ...  More + Product Details Close
Emerson alarm clock radio features relaxing sounds that help you unwind and fall asleep faster. Perfect for bedrooms, baby nurseries, spas, salons, apartments, offices and anywhere where unwanted disturbing or intrusive noise is a problem. The noise sound machine can help block out distractions and promote relaxation prior to sleep to provide you with a more peaceful, restful night sleep. Sounds include ocean side, rain, rain forest, summer night, tide and noise. With features such as a...
“Love how simple this digital timer is. I travel a lot, and it’s small enough to put in my purse. The off button is convenient because it keeps the buttons from being pressed while stored away and conserves the battery, but when you turn it back on, your setting are stored so no need to reset [each] time. … [There’s just the] clock, alarm, snooze, on/off. The smaller and simpler the better when I’m traveling.”
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