A brushed and polished brass finish gives this metal carriage alarm clock its enduring style. The decorative handle, turned brass button feet, and polished brass-tone columns at the corners add to the clock's stately presence. Beneath a glass crystal, the brushed brass-tone dial features circular, diamond-cut numeral ring, black Roman numerals, black hour and minute hands, and brass second and alarm hands.
Traditional led alarm clock models just don’t work for you? No problem. Blast your favorite mp3s or just have a crazy loud sound go off. You have to get up and actually step on this Instecho Carpet Alarm Clock to get it to stop, which is no problem.You’ll jump up, stomp on the mat, and be done with it—set it to play tunes for you afterwards (at a decent audio level) as a mini reward system. This mat gets up to 120 decibels (think as loud as two window unit air conditioners).
Not just a functional accent, this oversize wall clock brings pastoral style to any empty space in your abode. Crafted from wood and metal, it features a circular silhouette and cutout roman numerals as well as spade hands fixed atop a floral-inspired motif. Two AA batteries keep this design ticking and tocking, while a 36'' W x 36'' H x 1'' D frame is sure to grab glances in the entryway or over the living room seating group.

In a pendulum clock an escape wheel is allowed to rotate through the pitch of one tooth for each double swing of the pendulum and to transmit an impulse to the pendulum to keep it swinging. An ideal escapement would transmit the impulse without interfering with the free swing, and the impulse should be as uniform as possible. The double three-legged gravity escapement, which achieves the second of these but not the first, was invented by Edmund Beckett, afterward Lord Grimthorpe, and used by him for the great clock at Westminster, now generally known as Big Ben, which was installed in 1859. It became the standard for all really accurate tower clocks.

Most digital clocks use electronic mechanisms and LCD, LED, or VFD displays; many other display technologies are used as well (cathode ray tubes, nixie tubes, etc.). After a reset, battery change or power failure, these clocks without a backup battery or capacitor either start counting from 12:00, or stay at 12:00, often with blinking digits indicating that the time needs to be set. Some newer clocks will reset themselves based on radio or Internet time servers that are tuned to national atomic clocks. Since the advent of digital clocks in the 1960s, the use of analog clocks has declined significantly.
“Great little dual alarm clock. Super easy to set the two alarms. Easy to use. It has a night light feature with adjustable dimmer, which is great. You can adjust the display completely dark so you don’t see the numbers. Then you can just hit the snooze button when the alarm is not ringing and the display lights up. It’s powered only by 3 AA batteries: no electric cord, no USB, nothing that you need. If you need a fancy alarm clock that sprays water in your face, this is not it.”
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