A captivating timepiece, this 29-inch wall clock stylishly pays homage to French country style with elegance. Especially fitting for an empty wall space, this wooden piece effortlessly draws the eye with its bold Roman numerals and matching clock hands that hover over a pale aqua and ivory-colored face. Its fleur-de-lis and floral details are a harmonious match for a romantic and feminine aesthetic in the living room, which is easily complemented by other weathered décor and Parisian...
Don't worry, Zeus didn't show up to your home, but you'll certainly feel that way when waking up to this unit's thunderous, 113-decibel buzzing. Fair warning: It's definitely loud, so it's a good pick only if you're a heavy, heavy sleeper. Just in case the noise somehow isn't enough to pry you out of bed, this alarm clock flashes multiple bright red LEDs and comes with a bed shaker that'll really get you going. Trust us, if that sensory overload doesn't get the job done, nothing will.

In a pendulum clock an escape wheel is allowed to rotate through the pitch of one tooth for each double swing of the pendulum and to transmit an impulse to the pendulum to keep it swinging. An ideal escapement would transmit the impulse without interfering with the free swing, and the impulse should be as uniform as possible. The double three-legged gravity escapement, which achieves the second of these but not the first, was invented by Edmund Beckett, afterward Lord Grimthorpe, and used by him for the great clock at Westminster, now generally known as Big Ben, which was installed in 1859. It became the standard for all really accurate tower clocks.


Transform an open and plain wall into a timeless focal point with this oversized clock, a versatile addition that lends any room in your home a touch of charm. Crafted of metal, this gray-finished piece features inner and outer rings connected by large Roman numerals that bring classic appeal to your space. This open-faced design is perfect for making a statement without overwhelming your arrangement. Mount this analog over a well-worn leather sofa so you don't lose track of the time as you...
There’s a lot of science when it comes to sleeping, and there’s never a short supply of sleep-related tests going on. One of our favorite electronic brands here on Gear Hungry has made the most effective clock (in our humble opinion), and it’s the #8 pick: Philips Wake-Up HF3505. Slow light build mimics the sunrise, and gently pulls you out of a sleep-like trance before hitting you with some serious sound. Between price, effectiveness, and the fact that we didn’t have to chase it around the room (sorry Clocky, we’re not morning people), we absolutely loved this one.
You can set the clock to release aromatherapeutic scents in tandem with the light, choosing from four different fragrances that come with the clock or using your own essential oil blend. Fifteen minutes before your wake-up time, it'll also emit your choice of soft nature noises. The cycle ends with a chiming noise that gradually grows in volume to ensure that even the heaviest sleepers will wake up.
"Love it...Love it....Just a basic alarm clock needed one to check that my FM transmitter is on the correct frequency one that had a digital tuner fits the bill just fine and a battery back up clock for time announcements ....What can I say, it's a quality alarm, that never fails, and is not expensive Not once has this alarm failed to wake me up, Digits are bright and easy to see If I were to say something negative, The time is a little too fast (in a month you'll notice your like a minute or two ahead of the actual time, easy fix though) And the radio connection needs to better"
The Homedics SoundSpa Digital FM Tabletop Clock with time projection gives you the power to create a soothing, relaxing sleep environment. Choose from eight peaceful relaxation sounds including ocean, white noise, brook, rainforest, thunder, rain, fan, campfire, or simply switch on the radio. The SoundSpa Digital FM Tabletop Clock comes with the option of time projection and a soothing blue light.
Bring bold, eye-popping appeal to your walls with this absolutely striking wall clock, the perfect finishing touch to your industrial-inspired ensemble. Crafted from welded steel and featuring a deep black finish, this understated and chic clock lends a touch of simple style to your look, while its 39" diameter ensures it will make a big impact wherever you decide to hang it. Hang it up over muted stripe wallpaper in the living room to let the patterns show through this clock's openwork design...
The apparent position of the Sun in the sky moves over the course of each day, reflecting the rotation of the Earth. Shadows cast by stationary objects move correspondingly, so their positions can be used to indicate the time of day. A sundial shows the time by displaying the position of a shadow on a (usually) flat surface, which has markings that correspond to the hours.[7] Sundials can be horizontal, vertical, or in other orientations. Sundials were widely used in ancient times.[8] With the knowledge of latitude, a well-constructed sundial can measure local solar time with reasonable accuracy, within a minute or two. Sundials continued to be used to monitor the performance of clocks until the modern era.[citation needed]
In a pendulum clock an escape wheel is allowed to rotate through the pitch of one tooth for each double swing of the pendulum and to transmit an impulse to the pendulum to keep it swinging. An ideal escapement would transmit the impulse without interfering with the free swing, and the impulse should be as uniform as possible. The double three-legged gravity escapement, which achieves the second of these but not the first, was invented by Edmund Beckett, afterward Lord Grimthorpe, and used by him for the great clock at Westminster, now generally known as Big Ben, which was installed in 1859. It became the standard for all really accurate tower clocks.
Spring-driven clocks appeared during the 15th century,[25][26][27] although they are often erroneously credited to Nuremberg watchmaker Peter Henlein (or Henle, or Hele) around 1511.[28][29][30] The earliest existing spring driven clock is the chamber clock given to Phillip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, around 1430, now in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum.[4] Spring power presented clockmakers with a new problem: how to keep the clock movement running at a constant rate as the spring ran down. This resulted in the invention of the stackfreed and the fusee in the 15th century, and many other innovations, down to the invention of the modern going barrel in 1760.
“I bought this light because my partner and I need to be up early for work, but our bedroom has very poor natural light. Within a week, I’ve already noticed a difference in my energy levels and mood. The sunrise simulation works perfectly; by the time the ‘alarm’ (peaceful bird noises) goes off, I’m already feeling naturally awake — not groggy or jolted out of my sleep. I feel much more rested, and my average resting heart rate reflects that. I also really love the sunset feature. I wasn’t expecting to get much use out of it, but I feel like it does a great job of helping me settle into bed at the end of the day.”
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